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Old 09-26-2015, 05:19 PM
 
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Oblivious people might not know there are recognizable areas of European Architecture zones in areas of East Southeast South Asia. Not only because of invasive colonialism. Variation of architecture is inherent out of multiple reasons, and worthy to pay attention, and acknowledge.


All of the European Architecture Hot Spots Of Asia Include:

The Bund of Shanghai China, French Concession of the same city

Macau China, Goa India: Portuguese Colonial Architecture

Harbin China: Russian Buildings With A Chinese Twist

Qingdao: German Buildings Somehow. How Was This Ever Valid?

Saigon Ho Chi Minh Vietnam: Noticeable French Buildings Occasionally
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Old 09-26-2015, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,451,133 times
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Connaught Place in New Delhi. The roundabout at the very centre has these buildings that form a circle radiating around the road that are pretty cool even to this day. I like to imagine how it was during the Raj.

Look to the very periphery on the far left of the image, the whitewash coloured building is what I'm referring to:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connau...ajiv_Chowk.JPG

Here is (allegedly) a photo of it that seems to be before the end of the British in India:
http://www.asiapolitico.com/uploads/...717418.jpg?403
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Old 10-07-2015, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado
9 posts, read 8,725 times
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Manila, Philippines: Spanish architecture.
Mumbai, India: British architecture.
Hanoi, Vietnam: Like Saigon but much more colonial French.
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Old 10-07-2015, 11:52 PM
 
957 posts, read 1,548,484 times
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Huis Ten Bosch in Kyushu, Japan

For China, refer to http://thehungrysuitcase.com/the-10-...ties-of-china/
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Old 10-21-2015, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Singapore
653 posts, read 541,021 times
Reputation: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Oblivious people might not know there are recognizable areas of European Architecture zones in areas of East Southeast South Asia. Not only because of invasive colonialism. Variation of architecture is inherent out of multiple reasons, and worthy to pay attention, and acknowledge.


All of the European Architecture Hot Spots Of Asia Include:

The Bund of Shanghai China, French Concession of the same city

Macau China, Goa India: Portuguese Colonial Architecture

Harbin China: Russian Buildings With A Chinese Twist

Qingdao: German Buildings Somehow. How Was This Ever Valid?

Saigon Ho Chi Minh Vietnam: Noticeable French Buildings Occasionally
Sentosa Cove in Sentosa island looks like a avant-garde fusion interpretation of Monaco.
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Old 12-14-2015, 04:54 PM
 
1,676 posts, read 743,448 times
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Tel Aviv, with the German Bauhaus architecture
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Old 12-28-2015, 11:38 AM
 
6,066 posts, read 10,855,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
Connaught Place in New Delhi. The roundabout at the very centre has these buildings that form a circle radiating around the road that are pretty cool even to this day. I like to imagine how it was during the Raj.

Look to the very periphery on the far left of the image, the whitewash coloured building is what I'm referring to:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connau...ajiv_Chowk.JPG

Here is (allegedly) a photo of it that seems to be before the end of the British in India:
http://www.asiapolitico.com/uploads/...717418.jpg?403

Have you visited India before? Other than Goa, is there anywhere else with Indian fused Portuguese colonial architecture? https://www.google.com/search?q=Goa+...HRrlDeMQ_AUIBi

I have a feeling Goa is not the only one with the country of India having unbelievably stunning Portuguese architecture. Incredible these are all around India technically:

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portug...St.Cajetan.jpg

2. http://watermarked.impactphotos.com/1245400.jpg
http://www.besttoursingoa.com/images...hes-in-goa.jpg
http://www.beachhutbooking.com/image...aroque-Goa.jpg

3.There are only Indian people in front of the building to prove real legitimacy of a picture: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portug...h-talaulim.jpg

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 12-28-2015 at 12:18 PM..
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Old 12-28-2015, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
78 posts, read 72,639 times
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There is quite a bit of Portuguese architecture in the former Portuguese Colonies: Goa, Daman, Diu and Dadra Navar Haveli in India. Goa is probably the premier example as it was the capital of the Estado da India from early on, along with the Patriarchate of the Indies, hence its name as Rome of the Orient. Macau definitely has quite a bit of Portuguese architecture as well. In Sri Lanka and Melaka, Malaysia, you'll find a mixture of Portuguese, Dutch and British architecture. In India, Mumbai, Kolkota, Shimla and Chennai probably have the largest amount of British colonial architecture. Pondicherry in India also has some French architecture, though Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi have more. The Philippines of course has a large amount of Spanish colonial architecture and parts of Indonesia such as Jakarta have some of Dutch colonial architecture though much of it has been dwarfed by the growth of the modern city.
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Old 12-29-2015, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,451,133 times
Reputation: 4409
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Have you visited India before? Other than Goa, is there anywhere else with Indian fused Portuguese colonial architecture? https://www.google.com/search?q=Goa+...HRrlDeMQ_AUIBi

I have a feeling Goa is not the only one with the country of India having unbelievably stunning Portuguese architecture. Incredible these are all around India technically:

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portug...St.Cajetan.jpg

2. http://watermarked.impactphotos.com/1245400.jpg
http://www.besttoursingoa.com/images...hes-in-goa.jpg
http://www.beachhutbooking.com/image...aroque-Goa.jpg

3.There are only Indian people in front of the building to prove real legitimacy of a picture: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portug...h-talaulim.jpg
Yes, I've been to India twice before.

I think Goa was the only state that the Portuguese were involved with directly. They were pretty late to leave, and many of their cathedrals still exist within the state. There is one particular town that was evacuated due to disease that had pretty outstanding architecture. It still remains today, but is not very populous and run-down. I can't remember the name, but I'm sure someone will.

Also, Pondicherry is an interesting case on the Southeastern coast of India. The French were there.

Other than that, there's British stuff all over central Delhi and Kolkata. Shimla is a hill station up North that has a lot too.

There's a few Parts Unknown episodes about this, if you like Anthony Bourdain.
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Old 12-30-2015, 01:47 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,780 posts, read 13,368,018 times
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Parts of Macau still feel extremely European, specifically Mediterranean, with old buildings, post boxes, etc. When I was walking through Central Macau, with the squares and colonial era housing and motorbikes, it felt like i cluld have been in any town in Spain, Italy, Portugal, or any of their Latin American colonies. Very cool. Down by the casinos in Taipa, it felt and looked largely like Vegas, which a lot of people probably find repuslive and whine about, but I thought was interesting set against the rest of the territory. The Northern area, closer to the border, looks and feels like TST, MK, etc in Hong Kong, and also like some urban areas of mainland China that we built in the midcentury to 70's or 80's... very utilitarian and dense.

Guangzhou still has a few districts with many Colonial-era buildings, which are very cool. Some areas feel a lot like london or NYC, others more Mediterranean. It's fascinating to think that these buildings have seen colonialism's rise and fall, the Japanese invasion and occupation, the fall of the Emperor, the rose and fall of the KMT, the tumultuous 20th century, and now Guangzhou's modernization.
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