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Old 10-26-2015, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Singapore
653 posts, read 540,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
From my point of view, Bangkok Thailand has undergone some amazing changes over the last 3 decades. The city was quite large 25-30 years ago, but the greater metropolitan area has continued growing. I spent some time in the Sukhumvit Road area in the early 90's. Among some of the changes that I've noticed over the years is the increase in the number of high-rise buildings, and the addition of the BTS Skytrain.

Skytrain
Back in the early 90's, the Skytrain didn't exist, although construction of the support pillars were starting to go up around the Chatuchak Park area. There was no construction for the Skytrain out in the Sukhumvit Road area at that time. You could walk along Sukhumvit and see blue sky (when it wasn't smoggy). It's not so easy to have that kind of view today. There were actually times when there was barely any traffic on the road, but other times when traffic jams were the norm.

Below is a photo I took around 1992. The location was from a pedestrian bridge that crossed Sukhumvit near Soi 8. The direction is facing east. To the right, is the branch of Bangkok Bank, and just on the other side was a lot that was a gas station. The tall building in the distance on the right side of the road is the Times Square Building. On the left side of the photo, you can see a vertical yellow sign with red letters. It's hard to read, but it says Miami Hotel. The hotel was just a few steps on Soi 13 just off Sukhumvit. As I recall, I took that photo in the morning before rush hour began. As you can see, no skytrain. Such a view today (if there was no skytrain) would include a lot more high-rise buildings.
Attachment 160110

Here's another one I took in 1992 from the same footbridge but facing the opposite direction. The was during the morning rush hour. If there was no Skytrain, the view would include a good number of high-rise buildings in the distance.
Attachment 160112

Here's a link showing a couple of photos of what that general area of Sukhumvit Road looks like today. This is near Soi 18. It's quite a contrast. You can click the side arrow to switch to the second photo.
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...t_Road_-01.jpg


I also came across a short YT video showing Sukhumvit Road near Soi 1 in 1987.
It was probably taken with an 8mm or 16mm home movie camera.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlffJthGwUY


Skyscrapers
Here's a link of photos showing the Bangkok Cityscape showing how the city looks today.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/notjus...57643737901134

And this is a link showing "Then and Now" comparison photos of different cities, including Bangkok. The view of Bangkok is from the Lumpini Park area showing buildings along the Sukhumvit Road area off in the distance. The photos are from 1988 and 2007. It's quite a change over a 19-year period of time.
Then & Now: The Stunning Speed of Urban Development | Urbanist

By 2019 or 2020, Bangkok is planning to have a Super Tower that will be the tallest building in SE Asia.
ASEAN's tallest skyscraper is coming to Bangkok (Property Report) by 2020 | BigMangoProperties.com


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVHS1PO7BIk

Suvarnabhumi Airport was a real threat to Changi Airport; it could have become a real aerotropolis, bringing unmatched economic growth to Bangkok; in fact, many international carriers whom used Changi airport as a base for ASEAN region were already switching to Suvarnabhumi Airport even before it opened. The situation to Changi was far more serious than most people realised. Then the coup happened..........
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Old 10-26-2015, 03:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerbalm1985 View Post
Suvarnabhumi Airport was a real threat to Changi Airport; it could have become a real aerotropolis, bringing unmatched economic growth to Bangkok; in fact, many international carriers whom used Changi airport as a base for ASEAN region were already switching to Suvarnabhumi Airport even before it opened. The situation to Changi was far more serious than most people realised. Then the coup happened..........
The point I was making was just related to the growth and changes over the last 30 years. There's not much question that Suvarnabhumi Airport (humorously dubbed by long-term expats as "Camp Swampy") was a threat to Changi Airport. I think it's probably fair to say that hasn't really changed. Both Thailand and Singapore have their strengths and weaknesses. By coup, are you referring to Thailand?
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Singapore
653 posts, read 540,412 times
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There is this massive development called iskandar Development Region off the southern tip of Johor, north of Singapore. A lot of media hype, the idea is to build an active economic hub like a mini-Shenzhen in Johor, with various industry clusters.

Last edited by tigerbalm1985; 11-02-2015 at 06:56 PM..
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Singapore
653 posts, read 540,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerbalm1985 View Post
There is this massive development called iskandar Development Region off the southern tip of Johor, north of Singapore. A lot of media hype, the idea is to build an active economic hub like a mini-Shenzhen in Johor, with various industry clusters.
Much of the property purchasers in Iskandar are Mainland Chinese businessmen whom are seeking means and ways to move money out of China, even if iskandar development region is unstable.
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Old 12-28-2015, 02:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willister View Post
I'm Vietnamese-Australian, came here when I was 4 in 1986...the following denotes my visits back to Vietnam and just what improvements have been made since:

1995: First ever visit and first ever time I traveled outside Australia since arriving in Australia. Hated Vietnam - very unremarkable, all my time was spent in Ho Chi Minh City. My granny was one of the better off residents since she had foreign $ from Australia and Canada (where my uncles resided)...There were very few tourists, attractions and cars. Heck, my granny had an air conditioner and that was considered very luxury. Many beggars on the streets and you could tell most people weren't very well off, clothes/fashion resembled that of the past decade. Department stores few and far between, very difficult to source any Western products.

The skyline here is probably as tall as the suburb of Box Hill in Melbourne today. Nightlife is dead as despite the fact that I was only 15, my uncle took me on a scooter around night, the only places open were coffee shops.

2000: Saw a stark improvement since 1995, basically more of any related to consumer/western goods and the skyline started to build it. It was still mostly scooters on the streets.

2005: Death of my grandpa, so didn't get to see much, but you could definitely see the gradual improvement. A hell of a lot more foreign investment coming in from the Taiwanese, Koreans, Singaporeans but probably more overseas Vietnamese money. Higher class restaurants and bars started to appear. What I noticed was a lot more skyscrapers added.

2010: Pretty much of the same development on top of 2005 but basically roads and now congested and I think cars were pretty much common now. If you owned a car in 1995 HCMC it was a damn luxury. Other than that, I saw a lot more foreign tourists and the logical additions of tourist attractions.

2014: Went over to attend a cousin's wedding, these days I think if anything it's not far off tier 2 Asian cities like Taipei or You name it, they mostly have it. The women these days wear pretty much anything fashionable in the West and dare I say it, show as much skin. You have a glitzy skyline, chic bars, crowds of Westerners, clogged roads full of cars.

It's not up the the likes of Bangkok, Hong Kong, Seoul or Tokyo....but vs 1995 HCMC? It's day and night, heck its like its on another planet! Heck, if you told my 15 year old self that this city existed in Vietnam, I would have thought you were describing some fantasy city in Vietnam.

I'd imagine by 2020 odd, they'd add more skyscrapers and cars. They really need a metro train system!
Wow, Europe usually isn't dramatically altering this quickly compared to areas of Asia, especially Vietnam. Saigon ending up unrecognizable two decades later is a bright optimistic sign there. Only highlight maybe not going away are all of those happy go lucky cafes.

I hope you started to feel deep respect, and joy with Vietnam later on. Is this what occurred? I really want to finally visit. Absolutely believe Vietnam is one of my favorite countries(Out of a top 25 scale), and even wanting to live there.

Understanding the anecdotal reflection story, Saigon Ho Chi Minh became wealthier, more touristy, more attractive, increased business, nightlife, extra skyscrapers, and more cars around. Saigon really sounds imaginative to have altered urban landscape identity to fantasy city another Planet degree of mind.

There is a travel blog of an Australian visiting Vietnam, and discovering Saigon having one of the best wifi Independent Cafe scenes in the entire World. The incredible cafe scene of Ho Chi Minh City – Vietnam



Literally up to 30+ World Class Cafe landmarks at the city of Saigon.

These Are My Favorite Ones Visually!

La Fenetre Soleil http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...85761258-4.jpg

Cosmo Cafe http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...00495254-4.jpg

Chez Vous Coffee House http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...94874502-4.jpg

Coffee Viva http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...34192610-4.jpg

ID Cafe- District 1 http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...31661114-4.jpg

Paris Baguette Cafe http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...16684944-4.jpg

Thoi Vien Cafe http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...98782379-4.jpg

Cafe Chai-Bottle Coffee 4 Floor Wifi Cafe http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...77574728-4.jpg

My Life Coffee http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...72681018-4.jpg

Caffe Bene http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...82476501-4.jpg

The Morning Cafe http://photos.nomadicnotes.com/img/s...66697814-4.jpg

I wonder if all of these best Independent Cafes are starting up later than 1995 before the past one decade or if they are historic long lasting permanent community destination zone landmarks?
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Old 12-28-2015, 07:01 PM
 
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Vietnam nowadays is kinda like Shenzhen, Dongguan and Guangzhou etc before the year 2000. In the past many Cantonese people escaped to HK, Macau and overseas because of Commuism. Now people are returning due to economic development. The dark days in China and Vietnam were very terrible. They are much better now, but human rights in the 2 countries are still ****ty.
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Old 12-30-2015, 06:29 PM
 
276 posts, read 204,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digitalage3 View Post
Vietnam nowadays is kinda like Shenzhen, Dongguan and Guangzhou etc before the year 2000. In the past many Cantonese people escaped to HK, Macau and overseas because of Commuism. Now people are returning due to economic development. The dark days in China and Vietnam were very terrible. They are much better now, but human rights in the 2 countries are still ****ty.
Only Ho Chi Minh City is like Shenzhen...capitalist like hell, attracting American and Japanese companies nowadays, sick of the Koreans and Taiwanese treating them like slaves.

They have a problem now though of empty countryside towns.Having said that, with a smaller population and generally on good terms with the likes of the USA, Japan and Europe, I think it will have a better quality of life soon over China, less then pollution.
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Old 01-03-2016, 04:58 PM
 
6,066 posts, read 10,848,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digitalage3 View Post
Vietnam nowadays is kinda like Shenzhen, Dongguan and Guangzhou etc before the year 2000. In the past many Cantonese people escaped to HK, Macau and overseas because of Commuism. Now people are returning due to economic development. The dark days in China and Vietnam were very terrible. They are much better now, but human rights in the 2 countries are still ****ty.
Quote:
Originally Posted by willister View Post
Only Ho Chi Minh City is like Shenzhen...capitalist like hell, attracting American and Japanese companies nowadays, sick of the Koreans and Taiwanese treating them like slaves.

They have a problem now though of empty countryside towns.Having said that, with a smaller population and generally on good terms with the likes of the USA, Japan and Europe, I think it will have a better quality of life soon over China, less then pollution.
Depending on exact area of the country. Another land of extremes. Not all of Vietnam is very urban at all. Saigon Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi are at another elevation of atmosphere compared to those semi-secondary Chinese cities (Shenzhen, Dongguan, Guangzhou). Hoi An, Hue, Nha Trang, Ha Long are some of the rather thriving relatively rural areas destination towns compared to ultra urban Saigon, and Hanoi.

Vietnam's future is very ultra optimistic bright, and escaping any past problems.

Human rights is improving and not always such a bleak situation. There are enough fair rights of freedom, equality, and justice. Why else is Vietnam ranking high towards Peace, Happiness, and Satisfaction Of Life?

Lots of China is really extra fine, despite some issues. Not all of China is polluted, another false stereotype. Yunnan Province, Fujian, Hainan, Guangxi, Hunan, Guizhou, Hubei, and pretty much all of Western China have infinitely more clean air than Beijing-Tianjin, just a corner of China. Really at least 70%-90% of China has improved air compared to just one city metro.
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Old 01-07-2016, 07:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tigerbalm1985 View Post
many ASEAN nations have undergone significant change in infrastructure; especially in the building of new airports, highways and high-speed rails.

china is the new superpower of the Asia-Pacific regions, mostly because of economy and trade. China is eagerly pushing for Free trade Agreements with all of the region, while the US has locked itself out due to its reluctance to sign FTAs or the TPP.

as such, many economic development is driven from the China boom. In contrast, we see the United States as retreating.

there are now very few exports Asian nations want to even buy from the US. However, the US still maintain supremacy in 2 areas:

1.Higher education i.e the Ivy league universities and the top 50 universities, like NYU

2. Aerospace weapons technology: F15/F16 fighter jets, Apache helicopters, Chinooks, C130 (the germans build better tanks and the french build more cost-efficient warships)

Real estate is driven up by mainland chinese millionaire class; ultra-luxury high-rise estates all over the island.
China is not necessarily too dominant or with monopolized resources compared to all of those ultra successful and thriving nations not far away. There is enough equal distribution occurring between all areas of mainland Asia. While being very patriotic nationalistic loving, and respecting their own country, Chinese people also envy South Korea's democracy, Vietnam's World Class Wifi Independent Cafes, Singapore's wealth, Taiwan staying progressive, Japan's international appeal, Malaysia's Proton Cars, Bhutan's clean air(Even though lots of China actually has clean air too the further you go from Beijing), Thailand's relaxed laws, Indonesia's 17,508 islands, and Sri Lanka's temples religious spirituality.

All of them are equally my favorite Asian countries: Vietnam, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong/Macau/China, Thailand, Indonesia and if they count as other areas of Continental Asia Kazakhstan, Cyprus, UAE, Georgia, Azerbaijan.

To a lesser extent, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, India, Philippines, Brunei, Nepal, and if they count as Asia Turkey, Oman, Kyrgyzstan, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, Armenia, and Uzbekistan.

I wonder why mainland China is technically not nearly as wealthy compared to Singapore, Brunei, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, South Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Kazakhstan, Cyprus, and UAE. Yikes, according to some measures even Thailand somehow makes more average annual income money than China's average.

Yeah, mainland Asian countries don't really need anything from the USA. This country doesn't matter that far away. lol High education is already abundant around those areas of the World even ranking higher than USA depending on the exact measure. I wouldn't say any country is a superpower because that sounds too arrogant or a false claim. Every happy, peaceful, wealthy, successful, attractive, high quality of life, culturally vibrant, unique, or desirable country is very powerful and self-sufficient in their own version of illustration.
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Old 01-09-2016, 12:15 AM
 
Location: Singapore
653 posts, read 540,412 times
Reputation: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
China is not necessarily too dominant or with monopolized resources compared to all of those ultra successful and thriving nations not far away. There is enough equal distribution occurring between all areas of mainland Asia. While being very patriotic nationalistic loving, and respecting their own country, Chinese people also envy South Korea's democracy, Vietnam's World Class Wifi Independent Cafes, Singapore's wealth, Taiwan staying progressive, Japan's international appeal, Malaysia's Proton Cars, Bhutan's clean air(Even though lots of China actually has clean air too the further you go from Beijing), Thailand's relaxed laws, Indonesia's 17,508 islands, and Sri Lanka's temples religious spirituality.

All of them are equally my favorite Asian countries: Vietnam, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong/Macau/China, Thailand, Indonesia and if they count as other areas of Continental Asia Kazakhstan, Cyprus, UAE, Georgia, Azerbaijan.

To a lesser extent, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, India, Philippines, Brunei, Nepal, and if they count as Asia Turkey, Oman, Kyrgyzstan, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, Armenia, and Uzbekistan.

I wonder why mainland China is technically not nearly as wealthy compared to Singapore, Brunei, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, South Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Kazakhstan, Cyprus, and UAE. Yikes, according to some measures even Thailand somehow makes more average annual income money than China's average.

Yeah, mainland Asian countries don't really need anything from the USA. This country doesn't matter that far away. lol High education is already abundant around those areas of the World even ranking higher than USA depending on the exact measure. I wouldn't say any country is a superpower because that sounds too arrogant or a false claim. Every happy, peaceful, wealthy, successful, attractive, high quality of life, culturally vibrant, unique, or desirable country is very powerful and self-sufficient in their own version of illustration.
Do you mean actually mean GDP per capita? It is because China has a population of over a billion people; so when the total amount of GDP is divided by each Chinese resident in China, it drops a lot, even though China has more millionaires than any other Asia-Pacific country.

Take Singapore, as an example. For instance, the actual size of Singapore's economy, and the actual amount of trade and economic activity that goes through Singapore is actually a lot smaller than nearly all of the other South-east Asian countries, but because Singapore's population is also a lot smaller, the GDP per capita is also a lot smaller/
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