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Old 12-07-2015, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,358 posts, read 7,030,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rselah25 View Post
Just FYI - the "safety doors" are termed "platform doors"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platform_screen_doors

You'll see them in some places in the US (i.e. airports in particular), however not as common in the US for probably an array of factors:

A lot of US metros are much older than those Asian counterparts, so platform doors were for the most part never integrated from the start.

Platform doors are really expensive.

Especially in China, metro stations get really crowded, so I think there is an even greater need to ensure the safety of its riders.
I agree 100% with all your reasons, though I'd say the last one is very true in many places not just China.
Another reason I had assumed (but I don't know if it's true) is that platform doors require precision in stopping, as every opening must line up. In the US, I've taken many trains where the driver seemingly overruns most of the platform, leaving the waiting passengers scrambling to get to a train door.
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Old 12-08-2015, 05:47 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
14,816 posts, read 10,718,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Not sure but they have them in Bangkok too.
Never understood why developed countries not have these safety doors.
Having ridden metros in various cities in the US, several European countries, and several Asian countries my experience is that the Asian metros had the most shoving, jostling, pushing, and rushing to get on the trains - therefore more danger of being pushed on the tracks. I ride the DC metro all the time, it is fascinating to watch Asian tourists. There is a restless jitteriness and hyper-vigilance as the train approaches that you just don't see in Americans. And once the doors open the Asian tourists are more likely to crowd the door and rush in rather than wait for the passengers to depart. It really annoys the regular passengers, who expect passengers entering the trains to politely wait for them to depart it first. The difference in attitude is probably a combination of the trains generally being less crowded and culture.
Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
I agree 100% with all your reasons, though I'd say the last one is very true in many places not just China.
Another reason I had assumed (but I don't know if it's true) is that platform doors require precision in stopping, as every opening must line up. In the US, I've taken many trains where the driver seemingly overruns most of the platform, leaving the waiting passengers scrambling to get to a train door.
That has seldom been my experience but more likely the reason they are less precise about where they stop is that they don't have to be as much because they don't have those precise stops. If passengers could no longer get on the train if they stopped too far up they woukd get more precise quickly or get fired. Right now it doesn't matter that much if they are a "little" off.
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Old 12-08-2015, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,358 posts, read 7,030,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Having ridden metros in various cities in the US, several European countries, and several Asian countries my experience is that the Asian metros had the most shoving, jostling, pushing, and rushing to get on the trains - therefore more danger of being pushed on the tracks. I ride the DC metro all the time, it is fascinating to watch Asian tourists. There is a restless jitteriness and hyper-vigilance as the train approaches that you just don't see in Americans. And once the doors open the Asian tourists are more likely to crowd the door and rush in rather than wait for the passengers to depart. It really annoys the regular passengers, who expect passengers entering the trains to politely wait for them to depart it first. The difference in attitude is probably a combination of the trains generally being less crowded and culture.
You are probably observing Mainland Chinese. They have the least sense of order and civility. (Although as I said before almost all the major metropolitan areas in Asia have insanely packed railcars during rush hour so they're all used to infringing on personal space)

If you look at Singapore or HK transit, they actually lineup and are very proper and organized in their use of transit. Moreso than any other countries I've ever been to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
That has seldom been my experience but more likely the reason they are less precise about where they stop is that they don't have to be as much because they don't have those precise stops. If passengers could no longer get on the train if they stopped too far up they woukd get more precise quickly or get fired. Right now it doesn't matter that much if they are a "little" off.
You could be right that they aren't precise because they don't need to be. But in Asia they definitely need to be precise. On the Tokyo subways people enter certain train doors because they know when they get to their station that door will be the closest to their transfer, the elevator, the escalator, or whatever. The doors even have markings with corresponding numbers to indicate which doors to use. It's quite remarkable. There are other examples in other cities but Tokyo was the most complex that I'd seen. In America we think NYC is the fast paced world where everyone is in a rush, but man, these Asian cultures have us beat. They work twice as long and don't waste any time.
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Old 12-09-2015, 01:29 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,333,701 times
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maybe because Chinese riders need to suffer this on a daily basis. In Toronto, I observe many riders are reluctant to even enter the subway car when it is only like 50% full and decide to wait for the next train.


Moderator cut: copyright violation

Last edited by Oldhag1; 12-12-2015 at 04:35 AM..
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Old 12-15-2015, 07:26 PM
 
277 posts, read 207,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
You are probably observing Mainland Chinese. They have the least sense of order and civility. (Although as I said before almost all the major metropolitan areas in Asia have insanely packed railcars during rush hour so they're all used to infringing on personal space)

If you look at Singapore or HK transit, they actually lineup and are very proper and organized in their use of transit. Moreso than any other countries I've ever been to.



You could be right that they aren't precise because they don't need to be. But in Asia they definitely need to be precise. On the Tokyo subways people enter certain train doors because they know when they get to their station that door will be the closest to their transfer, the elevator, the escalator, or whatever. The doors even have markings with corresponding numbers to indicate which doors to use. It's quite remarkable. There are other examples in other cities but Tokyo was the most complex that I'd seen. In America we think NYC is the fast paced world where everyone is in a rush, but man, these Asian cultures have us beat. They work twice as long and don't waste any time.
Asian countries are highly unproductive and inefficient. I did a 3 month stint in my last job in both Singapore and Hong Kong (government exchange), many just stay back due to deeply ingrained cultures of staying back until the boss leaves (who in turn is adhering the culture of appearing to work hard because he is staying back doing long hrs!)


They work twice as long, but time wasting? Heck yes!
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Old 12-15-2015, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,358 posts, read 7,030,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willister View Post
Asian countries are highly unproductive and inefficient. I did a 3 month stint in my last job in both Singapore and Hong Kong (government exchange), many just stay back due to deeply ingrained cultures of staying back until the boss leaves (who in turn is adhering the culture of appearing to work hard because he is staying back doing long hrs!)


They work twice as long, but time wasting? Heck yes!
Yeah you are totally right. The hours are nearly twice as long but studies show productivity is basically equal. I guess they don't waste time when they choose not to, like with mass transit.
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Old 12-24-2015, 10:49 PM
 
Location: jembatan besi
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shanghai? when I expect in shanghai there
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:17 PM
 
1,089 posts, read 485,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sokor View Post
shanghai? when I expect in shanghai there
Here's Shanghai's



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwFIGOPVzHI

Last edited by 6oo9; 12-24-2015 at 11:30 PM..
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Old 12-25-2015, 01:55 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,802 posts, read 13,417,182 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
You are probably observing Mainland Chinese. They have the least sense of order and civility. (Although as I said before almost all the major metropolitan areas in Asia have insanely packed railcars during rush hour so they're all used to infringing on personal space)

If you look at Singapore or HK transit, they actually lineup and are very proper and organized in their use of transit. Moreso than any other countries I've ever been to.



You could be right that they aren't precise because they don't need to be. But in Asia they definitely need to be precise. On the Tokyo subways people enter certain train doors because they know when they get to their station that door will be the closest to their transfer, the elevator, the escalator, or whatever. The doors even have markings with corresponding numbers to indicate which doors to use. It's quite remarkable. There are other examples in other cities but Tokyo was the most complex that I'd seen. In America we think NYC is the fast paced world where everyone is in a rush, but man, these Asian cultures have us beat. They work twice as long and don't waste any time.
One thing that always gets me with the metro here is that even though everyone knows that they will have to use their card or token to exit the turnstiles, they still don't get it out till they are standing at the turnstiles, meaning that inevitably, there is a line of women fishing through their purses to find the thing. My wife does this, no matter how many times I remind her she should have it ready... Everywhere else I've been where you need an exit token or card, almost all people get them out in advance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by willister
Asian countries are highly unproductive and inefficient. I did a 3 month stint in my last job in both Singapore and Hong Kong (government exchange), many just stay back due to deeply ingrained cultures of staying back until the boss leaves (who in turn is adhering the culture of appearing to work hard because he is staying back doing long hrs!)


They work twice as long, but time wasting? Heck yes!
Can't speak for other countries per se, but here, yes, things are done very inefficiently. In any office where there's a Westerner - especially an American, since we come from a society in which chronic multitasking is the law of the land and failing to do so will prevent you from ever advancing in your career - the locals are always amazed at the speed with which we get stuff done, and our willingness and ability to do more than one thing well. In the US, businesses try to avoid hiring people full-time because of the cost of labor and benefits, so they lean on their employees to do ever more and more, while in China, labor is one of the cheapest resources available.

It can be maddening at times, but at the same time, it is also somewhat refreshing that people here seem less likely to do things like walk while eating, checking their phone, sign for a delivery slip while talking on the phone... things are done one thing at a time. Which is why you have things like getting your card out when you get to the turnstile...

1. I am on the metro.
2. I am exiting the metro.
3. I am walking to the turnstile.
4. I am stopping to answer a text message from a friend or colleague.
5. I am resuming my walk to the turnstile.
6. I am pulling my metro card out.
7. I am using the metro card to exit the metro.

etc...
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Old 12-25-2015, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Mount of Showing the Way
1,953 posts, read 2,079,678 times
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QksH4j28J1A
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