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Old 08-06-2018, 07:56 PM
 
1,505 posts, read 521,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathlete View Post
I live in both countries. Taiwan has lower wages and similar to higher costs than Japan where chronic deflation has kept prices moderate. Taiwan is a better place to be a business owner though and Japan is a better place by far to be an employee, particularly because of its growing labor shortage. The quality of life in Japan is better than in the US and better by far than Taiwan’s, where pollution, congestion and economic decline have led it to being called the ghost island by young people who see little hope in their future there.
Japan is cleaner than Taiwan, but also consider that Taipei is in a basin, so the smog is trapped inside. Whereas Tokyo and Osaka face the ocean and receive fresh ocean breezes to blow the smog away.

Congestion in Tokyo is no joke either. Nor is the incredibly stagnant Japanese economy. If you said Taiwan isn't growing as fast as China or Korea I would agree, but Japan is no economic growth star either.
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:27 PM
 
276 posts, read 204,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Japan is cleaner than Taiwan, but also consider that Taipei is in a basin, so the smog is trapped inside. Whereas Tokyo and Osaka face the ocean and receive fresh ocean breezes to blow the smog away.

Congestion in Tokyo is no joke either. Nor is the incredibly stagnant Japanese economy. If you said Taiwan isn't growing as fast as China or Korea I would agree, but Japan is no economic growth star either.
The problem with Taiwan is that it couldn't upgrade itself from their current level to the next as South Korea has. The same could probably be said for Japan but to a much lesser extent, in some ways Japan had grown on the economic ladder just not as visible...Added to this it much more difficult to grow once you are near the top of the economic ladder.

Japan has morphed from the front end to the back of things - they were pretty much where South Korea was in the late 70s to early 80s. It now is what I call an advanced critical parts manufacturer. For example they supply the most value added products after the USA and is also an important player in aerospace. The only real area where they lack is military and defense equipment.

Taiwan stagnated because it took the easy way out and never seriously restructured their economy, they still rely on low end/mid tier manufacturing which has low barriers of entry and can be easily replicated to some extent. China wins hands down on labour costs and also economies of scale so sooner rather than later Taiwan would be eclipsed. The only sector they really have an advantage over China is semi conductors but it would be interesting to see what it would be like 10 years down the track...especially with its links to AMD now.

South Korea was able to gain ground in the economic ladder after the 97 financial crisis. They pretty much grew from a bits part player in electronics to conquering and taking the crown away from Japan in fields like TVs/displays and new markets such as mobile phones and more importantly made some headway into automobiles and heavy industry (e.g. trains). Taiwan today is pretty much no different or have slipped on the economic ladder since the mid 90s.
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Old 08-06-2018, 10:54 PM
 
143 posts, read 92,536 times
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Where I live in Japan the economy seems to me to be doing alright. I am seeing a decline in the quality of service though due to a lack of workers.

Quote:
Economic expansion and a growing labour shortage
The Japanese economy has been on a growth path for five years since the end of 2012, and a growing number of companies are pointing to the tightening of the labour market. The unemployment rate has dropped to 2.7%, the lowest since 1993, while the jobs-to-applicants ratio has improved to 1.56, the highest since 1974. The Bank of Japan (BOJ)’s latest Short-Term Economic Survey of Enterprises in Japan (Tankan) survey showed that Japanese employers are facing the worst labour shortage since 1992. The diffusion index for employment conditions in all industries, calculated by subtracting the percentage of companies with a labour shortage from the percentage of those with a labour surplus, stood at -31. Labour shortage is particularly acute in non-manufacturing industries such as lodging, restaurants and catering, and transportation services.

Estimates by the Cabinet Office and the BOJ show that aggregate demand already exceeds supply at the macroeconomic level. The government’s economic outlook, approved by the Cabinet in December, predicts 1.8% real growth in GDP in the 2018 financial year. The figure, which exceeds potential growth rates estimated by many economic institutions, suggests that Japan’s demand surplus will expand in the coming months. It is easily predictable that Japanese employers will face even more severe labour shortfalls if the economy continues to expand.
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Old 08-06-2018, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
6,105 posts, read 1,826,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathlete View Post
I'm a permanent resident of Taiwan and own an apartment in Taipei. Probably the main reason why Taiwan looks so shabby is because Taiwanese people spend big money on the interiors of their apartments but spend as little as possible on the exteriors because impressing people is low on their list of priorities. Another factor is the average college graduate in Taiwan makes USD2,000 per month if they're lucky but even a ramshackle apartment can cost USD1,000,000.
If impressing people is low on their list then why do they spend big money on their interiors?

I know people who don't care to impress people, and they get their mattresses from used places and lay them on wood pallets. They don't spend "Big money" on interiors.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Japan is cleaner than Taiwan, but also consider that Taipei is in a basin, so the smog is trapped inside. Whereas Tokyo and Osaka face the ocean and receive fresh ocean breezes to blow the smog away.

Congestion in Tokyo is no joke either. Nor is the incredibly stagnant Japanese economy. If you said Taiwan isn't growing as fast as China or Korea I would agree, but Japan is no economic growth star either.

Congestion in Tokyo is avoidable by a simple invention called the subway. Japan has one of the most robust and extensive rapid transit systems in the world, I lived there for 3 years.
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Old 08-07-2018, 09:17 AM
 
1,505 posts, read 521,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
If impressing people is low on their list then why do they spend big money on their interiors?

I know people who don't care to impress people, and they get their mattresses from used places and lay them on wood pallets. They don't spend "Big money" on interiors.



Congestion in Tokyo is avoidable by a simple invention called the subway. Japan has one of the most robust and extensive rapid transit systems in the world, I lived there for 3 years.
Taipei has a very fine subway, too. The MRT now goes directly from the Taoyuan airport to downtown. Several new lines coming up in the next few years.

Admittedly, other cities in Taiwan were late in building their subways.
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Old 08-07-2018, 05:36 PM
 
2,546 posts, read 1,634,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
If impressing people is low on their list then why do they spend big money on their interiors?

I know people who don't care to impress people, and they get their mattresses from used places and lay them on wood pallets. They don't spend "Big money" on interiors.



Congestion in Tokyo is avoidable by a simple invention called the subway. Japan has one of the most robust and extensive rapid transit systems in the world, I lived there for 3 years.
You see your interior everyday so you want it to look good. You spend money for your benefit and comfort.


If you are doing well in your current home, renovate it may disturb and bring bad luck based on some Chinese belief.
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Old 08-07-2018, 08:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
. . If you are doing well in your current home, renovate it may disturb and bring bad luck based on some Chinese belief.
Nothing that burning some paper money and a visit by a feng shui master can't handle, according to my SIL.
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Old 08-07-2018, 10:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathlete View Post
Nothing that burning some paper money and a visit by a feng shui master can't handle, according to my SIL.
Older generations are more superstitious and generally don't like renovations
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Old 08-08-2018, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,116,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathlete View Post
Don't ask me. Ask whomever made such an idiotic statement.
You?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ObserverJC View Post
Many Taiwanese tourists' experience in Japan is that Japan is cheaper than Taiwan, and a common sentiment from Taiwanese I often read online is that taking a vacation in Japan is cheaper than in Taiwan.
Many Taiwanese tourists are thoroughly moronic. Their reasoning that Japan is cheaper is that certain supermarkets have some cheap vegies, dairy products, or fruits (usually when they are on sell), or that certain pills and supplements are cheaper (because they are made in Japan). It's remarkably stupid. My suggestion would be stop reading such feeble-minded crap.

They also don't realise that when you on a budget, you would plan your trip accordingly. I can tell you that I didn't spend much money on my trip to Sweden, by starving myself and staying at a youth hostel. Doesn't mean Sweden is cheap. If you tell any Japanese person that Taiwan is more expensive than Japan, they would laugh on your face. Hard. Sort of like what I'm about to do.

Quote:
I live in both countries. Taiwan has lower wages and similar to higher costs than Japan where chronic deflation has kept prices moderate. Taiwan is a better place to be a business owner though and Japan is a better place by far to be an employee, particularly because of its growing labor shortage. The quality of life in Japan is better than in the US and better by far than Taiwan’s, where pollution, congestion and economic decline have led it to being called the ghost island by young people who see little hope in their future there.


Yeah right.

And you tell the dead reporter who was working 319 hrs every month that japan is a great place to be an employee.

Btw, professions such as engineers could earn more in Taiwan than in Japan on absolute terms. It's a combination of factors like lower taxes and the fact that many Taiwanese firms have some pretty twisted practices of handing >10 months of bonuses instead of paying fixed wages of 13 or 14 months. Physician's pay is also higher in Taiwan than in Japan.
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Old 08-08-2018, 12:50 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,667,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
Older generations are more superstitious and generally don't like renovations

The pragmatic outweighs the superstitious in Taiwan, even for the older generations. Real estate price to rent ratio is among the world's highest in Taiwan, so many people rent. The renters will not renovate anything outside their units as they don't own it. Landlords won't renovate as long as they can still find renters. Even if a condo unit is owned, the common areas are not the responsibility of the unit owners, and so they won't spend money to renovate them. As long as they will continue to sell and unit prices still continues to increase, there is little to no reason for the homeowners association to plan and pay for renovations.
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