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Old 07-31-2018, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,434,812 times
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I have been looking at Taipei on google street view and it looks cool to me.
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Old 07-31-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Arcadia, CA
131 posts, read 51,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Cultural exports have nothing to do with artistic education at school. And Japan and Korea are both much bigger than Taiwan. No country of Taiwanís size has any significant cultural export. Itís just the way things are.

And China is known for about as little cultural products as Taiwan does. Itís pathetic for a country of that size.
Without proper art education it is difficult to develop the relevant cultural industries because there is little trained experts or popular support, not to mention art has more to do with quality than quantity so it is one of the few industries less related to size or natural resources. For example while Japan and South Korea are bigger and have more resources than Taiwan, compare with America they are both small yet their cultural products are still popular enough to attract foreigners. Japanese manga and anime for example are just as popular in America as they are in Asia.

China is indeed less developed in terms of cultural industry compare to Japan, South Korea, and America, but it is more like a newcomer learning the trade and it is slowly gaining ground. Based on what I know, Chinese TV shows are becoming more popular than Taiwanese ones in Taiwan, and in Los Angeles Chinese entertainment products have largely replaced Taiwanese products.
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Old 07-31-2018, 10:47 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,603 posts, read 70,482,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ObserverJC View Post
Without proper art education it is difficult to develop the relevant cultural industries because there is little trained experts or popular support, not to mention art has more to do with quality than quantity so it is one of the few industries less related to size or natural resources. For example while Japan and South Korea are bigger and have more resources than Taiwan, compare with America they are both small yet their cultural products are still popular enough to attract foreigners. Japanese manga and anime for example are just as popular in America as they are in Asia.

China is indeed less developed in terms of cultural industry compare to Japan, South Korea, and America, but it is more like a newcomer learning the trade and it is slowly gaining ground. Based on what I know, Chinese TV shows are becoming more popular than Taiwanese ones in Taiwan, and in Los Angeles Chinese entertainment products have largely replaced Taiwanese products.
"Proper art education"; if that were the key, then the US would be way behind Germany, France, Italy and other parts of Europe in producing and exporting art, but it's not. Art education in the US is a joke, yet the US still cranks out plenty of art, much of it of good quality. Art education in Russia is taken very seriously, as it is in Germany and France; the curriculum in grade school through HS is highly structured, and the progression of skills taught is geared toward developmental stages of children's brains. The dearth of art exports from Russia is due to other factors entirely.

Now I'm intrigued to find out more about Taiwan's art scene. Does it have one? Contemporary fine art from China is regularly on display for sale in my town, btw. There's at least one gallery that specializes in it. Two, if you count the gallery that sells contemporary (non-religious) art from Tibet. I haven't seen anything like that in San Francisco, but there must be a similar gallery there. Anchorage, AK has one or two. Like Russia, China prides itself on having preserved a traditional "school" of European fine art painting, and in China's case, that work does get exported to foreign markets.
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Old 07-31-2018, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Arcadia, CA
131 posts, read 51,579 times
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
"Proper art education"; if that were the key, then the US would be way behind Germany, France, Italy and other parts of Europe in producing and exporting art, but it's not. Art education in the US is a joke, yet the US still cranks out plenty of art, much of it of good quality. Art education in Russia is taken very seriously, as it is in Germany and France; the curriculum in grade school through HS is highly structured, and the progression of skills taught is geared toward developmental stages of children's brains. The dearth of art exports from Russia is due to other factors entirely.

Now I'm intrigued to find out more about Taiwan's art scene. Does it have one? Contemporary fine art from China is regularly on display for sale in my town, btw. There's at least one gallery that specializes in it. Two, if you count the gallery that sells contemporary (non-religious) art from Tibet. I haven't seen anything like that in San Francisco, but there must be a similar gallery there. Anchorage, AK has one or two. Like Russia, China prides itself on having preserved a traditional "school" of European fine art painting, and in China's case, that work does get exported to foreign markets.
Sorry I was being unclear about proper. What I was meant to say should be not negligent. When I was a child in Taiwan, art classes (music, fine art, etc) were considered secondary discipline to primary ones like math, science, etc. As a result when exams were near, art classes were often substituted for primary ones, which engendered a sense that art is not important and disinterest in art. To make matter worse many people still had the belief a career in art led to poverty and death by starvation, so parents were against their children pursuing artistic careers. The end result is a society that consumes a lot of foreigner entertainment products but produces not much of its own (now anyway, ironically in the authoritarian age Taiwan had produced a lot of entertainment products that sold well in both domestic and foreign markets).

Based on what I have learned, art scene in Taiwan is small, which I attribute to negligent in art education.
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Old 07-31-2018, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,118,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ObserverJC View Post
Without proper art education it is difficult to develop the relevant cultural industries because there is little trained experts or popular support, not to mention art has more to do with quality than quantity so it is one of the few industries less related to size or natural resources. For example while Japan and South Korea are bigger and have more resources than Taiwan, compare with America they are both small yet their cultural products are still popular enough to attract foreigners. Japanese manga and anime for example are just as popular in America as they are in Asia.
Japan and Korea are smaller than the US, so is their influence. Japanese anime and Kpop are popular, but they don't hold a candle against America's dominance.

Quote:
China is indeed less developed in terms of cultural industry compare to Japan, South Korea, and America, but it is more like a newcomer learning the trade and it is slowly gaining ground. Based on what I know, Chinese TV shows are becoming more popular than Taiwanese ones in Taiwan, and in Los Angeles Chinese entertainment products have largely replaced Taiwanese products.
Which Chinese shows are more popular than Taiwanese ones in Taiwan and what Chinese entertainment products are in Los Angeles? I certainly have not noticed such phenomenon in Taiwan. There have been a handful semi-popular Chinese tv shows, but they would have decent ratings and a limited following at best.

And when did Taiwan ever have any entertainment products in the States?

Quote:
Sorry I was being unclear about proper. What I was meant to say should be not negligent. When I was a child in Taiwan, art classes (music, fine art, etc) were considered secondary discipline to primary ones like math, science, etc. As a result when exams were near, art classes were often substituted for primary ones, which engendered a sense that art is not important and disinterest in art. To make matter worse many people still had the belief a career in art led to poverty and death by starvation, so parents were against their children pursuing artistic careers.
And what makes you so sure about the importance of art classes in these other countries? Have you attended schools in Japan, Korea, and China? How do you know that their art classes aren't also considered secondary disciplines?

Also, there is no need to pretend as if art classes aren't considered secondary disciplines in the West.

Quote:
The end result is a society that consumes a lot of foreigner entertainment products but produces not much of its own (now anyway, ironically in the authoritarian age Taiwan had produced a lot of entertainment products that sold well in both domestic and foreign markets).

Based on what I have learned, art scene in Taiwan is small, which I attribute to negligent in art education.
Taiwan's art scene is appropriate to its size. What did you expect for such a tiny country? A Taiwan wave? Give me a break.
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Old 07-31-2018, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Arcadia, CA
131 posts, read 51,579 times
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Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Japan and Korea are smaller than the US, so is their influence. Japanese anime and Kpop are popular, but they don't hold a candle against America's dominance.
It is true Japan and South Korea are no match for America but their influence is outsize compare to their sizes. Given how strong America is, anything is going to look small in comparison.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Which Chinese shows are more popular than Taiwanese ones in Taiwan and what Chinese entertainment products are in Los Angeles? I certainly have not noticed such phenomenon in Taiwan. There have been a handful semi-popular Chinese tv shows, but they would have decent ratings and a limited following at best.
Based on what I can gather, Chinese historic drama like Nirvana in Fire and The Advisors Alliance are popular in Taiwan. From what I read on the Taiwanese forums and news articles, the general impression is that Chinese TV shows are getting better everyday because the Chinese are willing to invest while Taiwanese companies are more concerned with lowering cost. Thanks to a large Chinese American community in Los Angeles Chinese music, video, movie, and, perhaps the one thing all races enjoy, Chinese food are abundant here.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
And when did Taiwan ever have any entertainment products in the States?
From 1980s to 1990s Taiwanese music and videos were very popular among Chinese and South East Asians in America, just as they were famous in Asia at the same time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
And what makes you so sure about the importance of art classes in these other countries? Have you attended schools in Japan, Korea, and China? How do you know that their art classes aren't also considered secondary disciplines?

Also, there is no need to pretend as if art classes aren't considered secondary disciplines in the West.
Though different from first hand experience, reading is not a bad way to learn about foreign countries. While China is much like Taiwan regarding art classes, the materials I read about Japan and South Korea suggest both countries take art classes seriously, so while art classes get less time than primary ones the students are taught knowledge that allow them to pursue art careers or develop an aesthetic sense. Similarly, while art classes also get less time than primary ones in America and not as serious as Japan or South Korea, they are more serious with their subjects than Taiwan. Perhaps I was not clear before, when I referred to art as secondary discipline in Taiwan, I meant they are considered unimportant and unworthy to be treated seriously.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Taiwan's art scene is appropriate to its size. What did you expect for such a tiny country? A Taiwan wave? Give me a break.
Again art has more to do with quality than quantity so size is not an excuse, especially when there was a Taiwan wave that made Taiwan the leader of Chinese culture soft power from 1980s to 1990s.
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Old 07-31-2018, 09:39 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 13 days ago)
 
5,173 posts, read 8,022,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I have been looking at Taipei on google street view and it looks cool to me.
You read my mind. Sure, its not a particularly beautiful city, but that doesn't mean it looks 'poor.' I think many people here equate beautiful with wealth when in reality it has to do with culture, IMO.

Sometimes I wonder what people on C-D are smoking because, it has to be some good quality stuff!
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Old 07-31-2018, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,434,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
You read my mind. Sure, its not a particularly beautiful city, but that doesn't mean it looks 'poor.' I think many people here equate beautiful with wealth when in reality it has to do with culture, IMO.

Sometimes I wonder what people on C-D are smoking because, it has to be some good quality stuff!
Yeah some of the comments on here are a bit ridiculous. Taipei looks fine.
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Old 07-31-2018, 10:13 PM
 
1,505 posts, read 522,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willister View Post
I can't work out Taiwan (based on a 3 week visit):

1. If it's really got a lot of $ but just hiding it (money not spent now new glitzy buildings)
2. If it's really not that rich and poorer than a lot of people/media claim it is.
It's definitely number 1. The Chinese are a frugal folk, maybe even more so than the Japanese.

Then you have Singapore which is mostly Chinese yet has spanking new buildings, world-class this and world-class that, and roads greener and nicer than Disneyworld's.
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Old 07-31-2018, 10:16 PM
 
1,505 posts, read 522,496 times
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Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I have been looking at Taipei on google street view and it looks cool to me.
It does until you see how cool Singapore looks like. That $80,000 GDP per capita does wonders!
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