U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-03-2016, 02:53 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,184,561 times
Reputation: 11619

Advertisements

Not surprised by the OP. In Northeast Asia, you'll never be Chinese/Korean/Japanese unless you were born and raised there and are of the blood. No outsiders (whites, blacks, Latinos, or 100% Asians of the respective country) will be integrated. Integration and Northeast Asia are like positive and negative matter. It's the same how Europeans view white Americans as forever foreigners, even if that white American lives in the country of his/her ancestors. They weren't born and raised there, so they are not "real Europeans". Same difference
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-03-2016, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
451 posts, read 1,080,417 times
Reputation: 357
Sorry to hear about the OP negative experience in South Korea. One of my Korean-American friends described Korea as a newly modern society with modern infrastructure, but the society is still steep in tradition and their attitudes does not match the modern society. NOTE: my wife and sister-in-law are both Korean-American (I know there is still a difference between Korean-Americans and Koreans from a cultural perspective), while I am Taiwanese-American. I have noticed that in Korean culture there is a more rigid hierarchy and protocol than Japanese, Chinese or Taiwanese culture. I know some have wondered why Koreans compared to Japanese or Taiwanese are less warm- I think part of it is that Korea before was closed society more so than Japan, Taiwan and China. It was not called the "Hermit Kingdom" for no reason.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2016, 07:09 PM
 
1,378 posts, read 1,815,453 times
Reputation: 980
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Not surprised by the OP. In Northeast Asia, you'll never be Chinese/Korean/Japanese unless you were born and raised there and are of the blood. No outsiders (whites, blacks, Latinos, or 100% Asians of the respective country) will be integrated. Integration and Northeast Asia are like positive and negative matter. It's the same how Europeans view white Americans as forever foreigners, even if that white American lives in the country of his/her ancestors. They weren't born and raised there, so they are not "real Europeans". Same difference
That's a nation-state for you. To citizens in a nation-state, ethnicity of nation state = citizen and they will never be able to comprehend anything else. You will never be viewed as a member of that respective country even if you are born and raised there. This is one reason why a lot of North African and Middle Eastern immigrants feel so much anger in much of Europe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2016, 10:10 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,184,561 times
Reputation: 11619
Quote:
Originally Posted by X14Freak View Post
That's a nation-state for you. To citizens in a nation-state, ethnicity of nation state = citizen and they will never be able to comprehend anything else. You will never be viewed as a member of that respective country even if you are born and raised there. This is one reason why a lot of North African and Middle Eastern immigrants feel so much anger in much of Europe.
To most countries in the world outside of North and South America, blood = citizenship either legally or as an accepted social construct. Northeast Asia is probably the most strict with this rule, with pure ethnic Japanese born and raised in Brazil treated as foreigners in the land of their forefathers. This is how the majority of the world works, as most of the world are not immigrant nations.

OP, you can think of it this way. You are pure Korean, but you weren't born and raised in Korea. You're like a cousin. You're acknowledged as part of the family with blood ties, but you aren't their brother. You weren't raised in the same house as them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2016, 03:17 AM
 
4,694 posts, read 3,618,305 times
Reputation: 7389
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jondo View Post
I'm Korean American and speak fluent Korean. Half my family live in Korea and I love them dearly. When I first came to Korea 5 years ago, I was so excited and full of love for Koreans and actually very patriotic. That's because I didn't know any real Koreans back in the US and my opinions of Koreans was formed via false Korean dramas that paint Koreans as deep, loyal, considerate people. That was as fake as the faces of most women in this country.
Koreans are extremely hostile, angry, psychologically imbalanced and mentally ill. Just yesterday in the subway, I was standing with my back against the wall and naturally my gaze was directed in front of me where there weren't any passengers. I was gazing at the empty bench where the elderly and infirm sit, but it was unoccupied. A late 50ish woman with her 80 year old mother walk into my line of sight and sit down. Naturally they are in my gaze since that's where I had been looking at even before they sat down. The 60ish woman gives me a cold hard bitten stare and holds it for a long time with a "what the fxxk are you looking at!?" look. Another time I was walking towards an office building turnstile/ID checking gate, when a 25ish woman went through it and walked towards me. Since we were directly in each others paths as we walked towards each other, she gave me a snarl, exactly like the one a mad dog gives. I am 40 years old and way older than her. Yes she snarled at me. I have never encountered such an animalistic snarl in my life. People are not only rude, inconsiderate and bad mannered here, but they are hostile, angry, antagonistic which makes it even worse. When I first came to Korea I got a job at a major hakwon here called YBM in Shinchon. As a requirement I had to sit in on a class and watch how the teacher taught. It was Christmas evening and I was having dinner with my family, so the last thing I wanted was to sit in on a class. I got there before the class started and out of politeness, I sat far in the corner away from the real students. When the female Korean teacher walked in, I bowed politely to her even though I was much older than her. She just glared at me with snake eyes and ignored my greetings. Later on, in front of the whole class, she yelled at me and demanded why I was in her class, even though she knew perfectly well that I would be attending her class as per policy.
Another time I was walking down Rodeo drive with an English friend. We were walking and talking normally when I heard a middle aged, middle class couple in their Burberry joke and snort at me as I walked passed them. Instinctively, I turned around to see the husband smirking and the wife glaring at me with so much hatred and contempt. My friend and I had done nothing wrong. We were quietly talking and walking past these Korean and yet they took it upon themselves to insult, mock and hate me so much. The wife's contemptuous look was directed at me, not to my English friend. One time, I was teaching a class, when a female teacher barged in without apologizing and in an irritated tone told me her class was supposed to be held in my room. I politely told her that I was told to use the class by the supervisor. She left in a huff. Instead of apologizing for interrupting, she got irritated, when I should have been the one being irritated at her interruption.
Etc etc etc.

After enduring so many of these twisted insolent acts almost on a daily basis, I've developed and intense hatred, fear and loathing for Koreans. I try to stay away from them as much as possible and cannot wait to leave for the USA for good. I've been to most Asian countries in North East Asia (Japan, China) and South East Asia, but they are all far more emotionally well balanced. Even Beijing is not as abnormal.
Why would you end with "even Beijing"? I have been to Beijing several times in various capacity, and I have never seen or heard of such obnoxious behavior on any Beijinger's part. What you describe is outright pathological.
The Koreans are insular in their mentality because they have always been a stepping stone for more powerful nations on the move. China stepped on them so many times everyone lost count. Japan stepped on them as a way to conquer the rest of Asia. Russia stepped on them to fight japan etc etc etc. The experience made the Koreans extremely patriotic in a collectively victimized sense and gave them an edgy and touchy attitude toward anything that is different from them. You can see it in their diplomacy to, both the north and the south.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2016, 05:48 AM
 
277 posts, read 205,204 times
Reputation: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by pennyone View Post
Why would you end with "even Beijing"? I have been to Beijing several times in various capacity, and I have never seen or heard of such obnoxious behavior on any Beijinger's part. What you describe is outright pathological.
The Koreans are insular in their mentality because they have always been a stepping stone for more powerful nations on the move. China stepped on them so many times everyone lost count. Japan stepped on them as a way to conquer the rest of Asia. Russia stepped on them to fight japan etc etc etc. The experience made the Koreans extremely patriotic in a collectively victimized sense and gave them an edgy and touchy attitude toward anything that is different from them. You can see it in their diplomacy to, both the north and the south.
It's also the nouveau found riches = developing some sort of Korean arrogance that has warped into that attitude. I'm pretty sure 20-30 years ago the Koreans weren't this hostile and arrogant.

Look at the Vietnamese - trampled over by god knows how many times by the Chinese, then a French, Japanese and American lapdog. Heck, we don't treat on a general basis, foreigners all that badly...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2016, 08:24 PM
 
919 posts, read 603,473 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
To most countries in the world outside of North and South America, blood = citizenship either legally or as an accepted social construct.
Well, I guess that's because Europeans invaded America.

BTW, Internment of Japanese Americans may be counted as an exception?
The internment of Japanese Americans in the United States was the forced relocation and incarceration during World War II of between 110,000 and 120,000[2] people of Japanese ancestry who lived on the Pacific coast in camps in the interior of the country. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens.[3][4] President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the incarceration shortly after Imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2016, 08:42 PM
 
919 posts, read 603,473 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by willister View Post
Look at the Vietnamese - trampled over by god knows how many times by the Chinese, then a French, Japanese and American lapdog. Heck, we don't treat on a general basis, foreigners all that badly...
I've heard a story from a Taiwanese.

Soichiro Honda, who established Honda Motor, tried to teach how to produce engines or something in Taiwan and Korea.

Taiwan engineers finally studied how to produce it, gave him a phone and said: "We made it! Would you have time to visit us, please? We hope to appreciate you!"

Meanwhile in Korea...

Korean engineers finally studied how to produce it, gave him a phone call and said: "We made it! We don't need you anymore!"

Just a story
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2016, 01:00 AM
 
1,424 posts, read 736,143 times
Reputation: 508
All Korean men serve in the military. Does that have an impact on their behavior and mentality?
I went through a military training when I was in college in China, because it is required. It was only one month but I felt it was an efficient way to kill personality and individualism. Some "good students" treasured by their parents and teachers back in school were treated like garbage and humiliated in public for mistakes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2016, 01:21 AM
 
956 posts, read 1,547,698 times
Reputation: 474
Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
All Korean men serve in the military. Does that have an impact on their behavior and mentality?
I went through a military training when I was in college in China, because it is required. It was only one month but I felt it was an efficient way to kill personality and individualism. Some "good students" treasured by their parents and teachers back in school were treated like garbage and humiliated in public for mistakes.

Really?! (To this day)Are all Chinese men required to attend the military training for a month?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top