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Old 02-07-2016, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,347,718 times
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^ that much is true. I can't tell you the number of people I've met who come here to China and are like, "oh, I'll do it for six months or a year" and then stay much longer.

The COL/QOL ratio stomps what most recent grads in the US could hope for, (for men at least) the dating scene is way more pleasant, business opportunities are much more plentiful and fruitful... Even a lot of the people I know who head back home end up coming back after a few months of not being able to find work, living in a tiny apartment that costs half their monthly income, etc.
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Old 02-09-2016, 07:56 PM
 
992 posts, read 937,271 times
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That did happen to my friend who teaches in Shanghai currently, and who initially taught in Seoul.

However, I would be going back to the States to attend law school, so that kind of changes things...
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Old 02-10-2016, 05:21 PM
 
448 posts, read 499,025 times
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What is it like teaching english in Japan? a country with less people of good english compared with Korea, Taiwan and Shanghai, and most Japanese have never think of moving to or studying in an english speaking country.
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Old 02-11-2016, 08:08 AM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,153,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanRam View Post
That did happen to my friend who teaches in Shanghai currently, and who initially taught in Seoul.

However, I would be going back to the States to attend law school, so that kind of changes things...
How long are you gonna be gone? A semester?

Last edited by theunbrainwashed; 02-11-2016 at 08:33 AM..
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Old 02-16-2016, 08:03 PM
 
992 posts, read 937,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
How long are you gonna be gone? A semester?
I figured I'd teach from August of 2016 to July of 2017, and then start law school in the fall of 2017
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:16 AM
 
32,055 posts, read 32,956,580 times
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The biggest problem with China is the pollution. Also if you are hired by a Chinese institution the pay is very low. So it is only worthwhile financially to go to China if your employer is not Chinese.

From what I know of Japan the cost of living is very high and whatever you earn there will go towards your living expenses and you won't be able to save any money.

Korea is supposedly the best deal financially for English teachers as the pay is decent enough to live well and then save money for the future. But one has to be careful with Korean employers as some of them expect much overtime without paying one extra money for these overtime hours.
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Old 02-17-2016, 07:03 PM
 
369 posts, read 799,502 times
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I think Seoul would be your best bet if value for money is what you are concerned about most.

Your accommodation and airfare to Seoul are pretty much covered; only downside is you can't choose where in the city to live in. So you would save more money teaching in Seoul than in Tokyo yet enjoy the cool aspects of the city and Korean culture that you won't have access to in other countries.

Seoul is also in between Shanghai and Tokyo so you can fly to either city for weekend getaways.

However, it seems that the English teachers are expected to follow a more rigid structure or guide whereas those in Japan have greater freedom to decide how their students are to be taught. Not sure about China though.
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Old 02-18-2016, 03:37 AM
 
919 posts, read 602,186 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lokeung) View Post
What is it like teaching english in Japan? a country with less people of good english compared with Korea, Taiwan and Shanghai, and most Japanese have never think of moving to or studying in an english speaking country.
According to the table below, you missed something.

How Japan Compares With The World In English Proficiency



#13 South Korea
#14 Japan
#17 France
#23 Italy
#24 Taiwan
#29 China
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Old 02-18-2016, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,114,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
According to the table below, you missed something.

How Japan Compares With The World In English Proficiency



#13 South Korea
#14 Japan
#17 France
#23 Italy
#24 Taiwan
#29 China
A sit-down test/survey means very little. The reality is that Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, and Chinese ppl all speak ****e English and all four peoples are on the same level, give or take.

Italians and French also speak horrible English, but it's a lot easier to find someone who could understand you on the streets of Paris or Milano if you don't speak French or Italian. It's also a lot easier to order in a random, small restaurant in France or Italy than in Japan or Taiwan if you only know English.

Btw there's no way that Portugal would score worse than Japan and Korea. When I was there I had barely any problem communication-wise. Almost everyone in Porto and Lisbon spoke at least conversational English.
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Old 02-18-2016, 07:53 PM
 
919 posts, read 602,186 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
A sit-down test/survey means very little. The reality is that Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, and Chinese ppl all speak ****e English and all four peoples are on the same level, give or take.

Italians and French also speak horrible English, but it's a lot easier to find someone who could understand you on the streets of Paris or Milano if you don't speak French or Italian. It's also a lot easier to order in a random, small restaurant in France or Italy than in Japan or Taiwan if you only know English.

Btw there's no way that Portugal would score worse than Japan and Korea. When I was there I had barely any problem communication-wise. Almost everyone in Porto and Lisbon spoke at least conversational English.
Thanks for your subjective comment with no data, as always.
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