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Old 08-05-2018, 04:51 PM
 
Location: DFW
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For some reason, South Korea is far more Christian than even the most devout Bible Belt towns in the US.
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Old 08-05-2018, 07:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Who knows. I'm just glad that Christianity is really weak in TW. I never care about religions and I know religious people who are totally open-minded and the churches in Europe hang the rainbow flag all the time, unfortunately most of the Christians in TW are not like that. Imagine how prude and homophobic TW would be if it was more Christian (not that it isn't prude and homophobic right now). One of (the many) reasons why gay marriage hasn't been legalised yet is because of these feeble-minded churches.


There's an extremely religious American school in Taichung (Morrison or something) and OMG are those people scary. It's like a living freak show.

Your comments are extremely ignorant and shows you know nothing about your own people. There are thousands of Taiwanese Christians living in Taiwan and in the U.S. that dedicate their entire lives to doing good in this world. That means helping Christians and non-Christians. They are usually highly educated Taiwanese who are also successful business leaders and executives. Just because you know one church that is super conservative, doesn't mean you should blanket an entire group of people with your one experience or from what you "heard".


There are certainly very conservative Christian and Taiwanese Christian groups that go way too far, but those goups are always in the minority, and some even border on a cult.


You don't hear so many feel good stories about Christians these days because most of them do good in this world and don't need to boast about it. Many are humble, hard working people who give their lives to helping others. I'd much rather want to be in the presence of these people then having to watch a parade of people in the streets of the U.S. showcasing their sexual orientation. Do whatever you want at home. Gay people should have the right to marry as well. I've agreed with that statement well before our "liberal" presidents said so, but why is it important to bash a group of people just because you assume who they are based on your limited experience with them?


Respect works both ways.
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Old 08-05-2018, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,515 posts, read 3,097,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsuleneo View Post
The Neo-Confucian class suppressed Buddhism during the Joseon era, meaning there was no effective counterbalance against the spread of Christianity in Korea. Plus, many South Koreans associate Buddhism with flat-nose slanted-eye yellow people while associate Christianity with beautiful white people.

i think this statement may have some merit.


need to bring back buddha and korean shamanism.
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Old 08-06-2018, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
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Christianity is often associated with the United States. For Japan, this would have been historically a negative; the U.S. was the one that defeated them in war and then occupied their country. But for South Korea, it's the opposite; the U.S. is the country that freed them from Japan's domination and then saved them from North Korean and Chinese invasion.

Whether or not this explains Christianity's popularity in South Korea and lack of same in Japan, I don't know. But I would think that at least it has something to do with it.

Incidentally, the man who led the air raid on Pearl Harbor, Commander Mitsuo Fuchida, became a Christian after the war and spent several decades evangelizing in Japan and around the world. I would have thought that its embrace by a war hero might have made Christianity more palatable to his countrymen, but apparently not.
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Old 08-06-2018, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsuleneo View Post
The Neo-Confucian class suppressed Buddhism during the Joseon era, meaning there was no effective counterbalance against the spread of Christianity in Korea. Plus, many South Koreans associate Buddhism with flat-nose slanted-eye yellow people while associate Christianity with beautiful white people.

Are you saying that South Koreans are self-loathing?
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Old 08-06-2018, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
Christianity is often associated with the United States. For Japan, this would have been historically a negative; the U.S. was the one that defeated them in war and then occupied their country. But for South Korea, it's the opposite; the U.S. is the country that freed them from Japan's domination and then saved them from North Korean and Chinese invasion.

Whether or not this explains Christianity's popularity in South Korea and lack of same in Japan, I don't know. But I would think that at least it has something to do with it.

Incidentally, the man who led the air raid on Pearl Harbor, Commander Mitsuo Fuchida, became a Christian after the war and spent several decades evangelizing in Japan and around the world. I would have thought that its embrace by a war hero might have made Christianity more palatable to his countrymen, but apparently not.

I think its because more japanese had science classes and were educated more.



Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
Are you saying that South Koreans are self-loathing?

yes like the people living in the islands named after king phillip of spain
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,151 posts, read 950,739 times
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i long operated under the assumption that "Christianity" was more prevalent in South Korea because that country was targeted more strongly by American missionaries from certain sects. Perhaps that was part of the reason, but I am not an expert on this subject. Consistent with that, it does seem that South Koreans who identify as Christian seem to have more in common with what used to be considered non-mainstream versions of Christianity in the US.

On a slightly different note, I've noticed a sort of mix-and-match religious behavior in some Koreans, but also other east Asian folks. For instance, and older Korean friend who had some health issues alternated between using Buddhist and fundamentalist Christian approaches to dealing with his illness. Plus, traditional (non-western) medical approaches. He got better, so perhaps something in that mixed approach worked.
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,159,509 times
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South Korean Buddhism doesn't seem as 'deep' and 'entrenched' as in other Asian Buddhist locations - i.e. Japan, Thailand, Myanmar, etc.

It appears a bit boring, dull, window-dressing-ish. Like a copy of something from China, but lacking the depth. Whereas when I view shrines and temples in Japan, the Buddhist shrines and temples feel so deep, well-grounded, beautiful, incredible, awe-inspiring and worthy or respect.
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Old 09-03-2018, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,151 posts, read 950,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
South Korean Buddhism doesn't seem as 'deep' and 'entrenched' as in other Asian Buddhist locations - i.e. Japan, Thailand, Myanmar, etc.

It appears a bit boring, dull, window-dressing-ish. Like a copy of something from China, but lacking the depth. Whereas when I view shrines and temples in Japan, the Buddhist shrines and temples feel so deep, well-grounded, beautiful, incredible, awe-inspiring and worthy or respect.
I know that you are more knowledgeable than me, having lived there. Despite that, I agree that the Japanese Buddhist temples are different. Less use of bright colors (like red) and more use of colors and textures that seem more natural, less flashy. Maybe its an influence from Shintoism? That would seem to fit in with the traditional Japanese focus on nature and cleanliness. I've only been to Korea once, but the temples and other old structures I saw reminded me more of the Japanese style than the Chinese. But ... that's just my opinion from limited experience.

That said, I've enjoyed the Chinese temples and gardens also. Before I traveled there, I had read that many had fallen into disrepair, but they've done a good job of restoring many.

Back to religion in general, I've had many friends from both Taiwan and mainland China. A number of the Taiwanese (maybe KMT) women I've known have English names like Faith, Grace, or Hope. Very Christian. I've never known a mainland woman with a name like that. However, some (perhaps many) of my friends from the mainland attend Christian churches here in the US. One confided to me that he only attended for its value in networking for business. I don't think he's the only one.
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Old 09-03-2018, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,515 posts, read 3,097,762 times
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i think its mostly because of the extreme suffering of japanese occupation and american missionaries that they have converted. Plus, koreans like to be hardcore and take it to the extreme. Its miraculous they didn't end up like the Philippines or the western roman empire.


I guess it could be worse. The could have converted the ways of bedoiun. Look how that turned out in malaysia:


https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/03/asia/...ntl/index.html


garuda and buddha need a comeback.


focus on science
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