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Old 05-22-2016, 12:06 AM
 
1,424 posts, read 734,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
You need one for China, it applies to Chinese citizens but foreigners I don't know. In Russia, you need an exit visa
No. I'm a Chinese citizen and traveled to four continents, and I never heard of exit visa. It does not exist in China .
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Old 05-22-2016, 12:29 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
317 posts, read 236,424 times
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Which leads me to ask, is a police clearance required of foreigners once they leave China. Do I have to go down to local police station once school year is over??
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Old 05-22-2016, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Big Bayou
721 posts, read 299,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmlandis View Post
Which leads me to ask, is a police clearance required of foreigners once they leave China. Do I have to go down to local police station once school year is over??
I don't think a police clearance is required to leave, but your next school might want to see a police clearance before you start teaching there. I know Nord Anglia schools (they have like 19 international schools around the world) do want a police clearance from your previous post.
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Old 05-22-2016, 07:04 PM
 
4,338 posts, read 2,263,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soursop View Post
I considered Dubai. I still have it on the back of my mind for the future.

A buddy of mine works in Doha, Qatar teaching English. He teaches 4 hour long blocks a day for $12,000 usd a month plus housing on a compound provided. Hes making $144,000 a year working 20 hour weeks with food as his only expense. The only reason I didn't follow him is because the school apparently has to sign off on his exit visa and won't do it until he completes his contract. That makes me nervous even if it is common.
No such thing as employee rights in most of the GCC. You complete the contract, you pay to get out or you get the ban. Your friend sounds like he has a sweet deal but yes you better meet the contract. Even then sometimes bad employers don't meet their end of the contract. Personally I hate Doha but Bahrain, UAE and even Oman are very nice, friendly places.
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Old 05-23-2016, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,159,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
I've lived in China for 15 years now, and have a wife and 2 kids and I keep thinking of what life would be like back in the U.S. I also feel somewhat guilty for all of the holidays, birthdays, vacations and other events I've missed with my siblings and their young families, not to mention my parents missing me. China nor I are the same compared to 10 or 15 years ago when it was fun to live here. China continues to appear to be a young man's game, as I watch more and more of my expat friends eventually settle down, and leave China to countries with better schools, better air quality and better food safety. China is not cheap anymore, the being a "special foreigner" in China is slowly wearing off, and living here just has become more of a strain. I know many of you on this forum are young people without families, but regardless, how do you feel about leaving Asia as you get older? Do all of us after a while have this "the grass is always greener on the other side" thinking? Have any of you left Asia and hated or were bored with your home country you moved back to Asia? I like China, and its given me so much, but with 2 young kids, I really would prefer them not being raised in Mainland China. Perhaps I'm being selfish with my family if I stay longer or indefinitely here in China? Lot's to think about but I'd love to hear from others. Thanks
I think it depends where you live. I've been a long-term expat as well, and I have two kids.

Japan, tons of foreigners stay there and raise their kids. My kids were born there. If I had a fully secure job for life, I'd probably never leave that country. When I was in Japan, I used to think about how the U.S. school system could be so dicey - i.e. drugs and bad schools, and a lack of enthusiasm or support for Education in much of the U.S., compared to East Asia.

But when I lived in Korea, I would have preferred the U.S. school system anyday, not to mention the culture and such. China always seemed like an even worse Korea to me. I did like Korea a lot, but generally, it just isn't a place you'd want to raise kids.

Here in Macau/Hong Kong, raising kids is absolutely fine. I prefer Macau where I'm living now, and raising kids here is fantastic. I'd also consider Hong Kong or Singapore, as even better options, more English schools, etc. Plus, I consider them good societies for kids, without the enormous drug peer pressure you'd get in the U.S., etc.

In short, it just depends on your current environment while living abroad. You can feel where is and isn't better than the U.S. I would think that if I were living in Mainland China, I would probably be considering other options if raising kids. But, I'm sure there are good pockets there somewhere as well.
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Old 05-23-2016, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,355,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmlandis View Post
Which leads me to ask, is a police clearance required of foreigners once they leave China. Do I have to go down to local police station once school year is over??
Nope, not that I'm aware of.
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Old 05-25-2016, 09:47 PM
 
655 posts, read 582,522 times
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Thanks Tiger Beer for the input. By far, the biggest issue I have is with the school system, as well as the environment (mostly my kids classmates and their parents/grandparents & Ayi's) that concerns me the most with raising kids in Mainland China. Even "great" public Chinese schools, are not that great compared to good U.S. public schools. Another issue is I have one adopted daughter who's Chinese, and a second Child born from my wife who's obviously of mixed race. Could you imagine the comments and teasing the local kids would dish out because my kids are different, or have a different looking parent. As much as I highly respect China, I'm never going to be considered Chinese, and neither will my kids so we'll always be "different"....lol.


Private schools are 25k usd roughly, and I don't think they're as good as public or private schools in the U.S. Plus I'd have to negotiate with my company to pay the school fees as I really don't want to pay 25k usd for my kid to go play at school. That's a lot of money, and just seems like a waste.
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Old 05-26-2016, 01:35 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,355,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Thanks Tiger Beer for the input. By far, the biggest issue I have is with the school system, as well as the environment (mostly my kids classmates and their parents/grandparents & Ayi's) that concerns me the most with raising kids in Mainland China. Even "great" public Chinese schools, are not that great compared to good U.S. public schools. Another issue is I have one adopted daughter who's Chinese, and a second Child born from my wife who's obviously of mixed race. Could you imagine the comments and teasing the local kids would dish out because my kids are different, or have a different looking parent. As much as I highly respect China, I'm never going to be considered Chinese, and neither will my kids so we'll always be "different"....lol.


Private schools are 25k usd roughly, and I don't think they're as good as public or private schools in the U.S. Plus I'd have to negotiate with my company to pay the school fees as I really don't want to pay 25k usd for my kid to go play at school. That's a lot of money, and just seems like a waste.
This is something that my wife and I are dealing with now, since we have a baby on the way (two months to go). We live in Guangzhou, but because of China's asinine hukou system, my wife's status is as a resident of Guangzhou but not a citizen, and our child can't go to public school here without paying a ridiculous sum of money. If we send them to school back in Hunan, then we don't get to see our kid. I used to be a teacher here and my bar is a frequent and popular gathering place for many of the area's ESL and international school teachers, so I know what the foreign education is like here... like you said, you will have to pay over $20k USD and the education is still only just on par with what you'd find in a working-class suburb of a third tier city.

The plan that we've hatched is that we'll most likely simply register our child as a foreigner - it's much easier for a foreign kid to get into a Chinese school than a Chinese kid with the wrong hukou - and send them to a public school for kindergarten and maybe early primary school. They will still get plenty of creativity education at home, and also get socialized for the place they're going to spend most of their childhood in. When they get a bit older, then we will either send them to one of the bigger foreign schools, or back to Massachusetts to live with my parents, who are both retired educators.

I think it's only in the last few days that my wife has started to fully realize that our child's being mixed is going to run deeper than having lighter hair and a higher nose bridge. She is in a few Wechat groups for mothers of mixed children, and has been reading some of the moms' horror stories of when the other kids realize there's something different about them, and tell them that they're not "really" Chinese. This has given her pause over more or less everything - from the time we first met, it's always been, "I want to visit America, but will never live there," to "maybe we can buy a house in California so our baby is around other mixed children."
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Old 05-26-2016, 10:20 AM
 
1,424 posts, read 734,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
This is something that my wife and I are dealing with now, since we have a baby on the way (two months to go). We live in Guangzhou, but because of China's asinine hukou system, my wife's status is as a resident of Guangzhou but not a citizen, and our child can't go to public school here without paying a ridiculous sum of money. If we send them to school back in Hunan, then we don't get to see our kid. I used to be a teacher here and my bar is a frequent and popular gathering place for many of the area's ESL and international school teachers, so I know what the foreign education is like here... like you said, you will have to pay over $20k USD and the education is still only just on par with what you'd find in a working-class suburb of a third tier city.

The plan that we've hatched is that we'll most likely simply register our child as a foreigner - it's much easier for a foreign kid to get into a Chinese school than a Chinese kid with the wrong hukou - and send them to a public school for kindergarten and maybe early primary school. They will still get plenty of creativity education at home, and also get socialized for the place they're going to spend most of their childhood in. When they get a bit older, then we will either send them to one of the bigger foreign schools, or back to Massachusetts to live with my parents, who are both retired educators.

I think it's only in the last few days that my wife has started to fully realize that our child's being mixed is going to run deeper than having lighter hair and a higher nose bridge. She is in a few Wechat groups for mothers of mixed children, and has been reading some of the moms' horror stories of when the other kids realize there's something different about them, and tell them that they're not "really" Chinese. This has given her pause over more or less everything - from the time we first met, it's always been, "I want to visit America, but will never live there," to "maybe we can buy a house in California so our baby is around other mixed children."
I think it would be better for such a kid to grow up in America.
Schools in China also have a lot of nationalist/patriotic education, which may confuse a mixed young child.
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Old 05-26-2016, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,355,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
I think it would be better for such a kid to grow up in America.
Schools in China also have a lot of nationalist/patriotic education, which may confuse a mixed young child.
It does concern me a fair deal, and I think it should any parent of a mixed child here. The nationalism and indoctrination in bafflingly-incorrect history really worries me; I can't very well let them grow up believing lies, which means that they will instead grow up learning to mistrust and challenge what they've been told by teachers and society... something that's considered virtuous in the West, but unacceptable in China.

I made the choice to move here, and so I can deal with the daily discrimination since I knew what I was getting into... my wife made the decision to marry me, and so she also made the conscious decision to do so, out of love. Of course, it is a burden for her to carry that she never previously planned on dealing with, but, she made that decision. Our child didn't get to decide to be a .001% minority here.

I don't want them to grow up totally removed from either of their ancestral societies: I don't want a kid who thinks that China is hell on earth because everyone treats him like an outsider, or who thinks that America is the worst place on earth because the people on TV don't look like him. I'd rather them be able to form an identity that suits them as an individual, between both cultures, and the best way to do that is to make sure that they spend ample time in both places, which creates a logistical and financial burden that I've had to accept.

Good thing my business is doing well...
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