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Old 05-20-2016, 08:20 AM
 
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The richest region of China (outside Hong Kong), surprisingly, is not Shanghai. It is the five neighbouring cities of Jiangsu Province located south of the Yangtze River, immediately north-west of Shanghai, collectively called "Sunan" (South Jiangsu).


Sunan has a total population of 33 million (similar to that of Canada), with a land area of 28,000 sq km. In 2015, the region had a per capita GDP of just about USD 20,000 (depending on what exchange rate on uses). Shanghai's per capita GDP is about 18% lower. Prior to the PRC, Shanghai used to be part of Jiangsu Province and shares the same language and culture with most of Sunan.


If it were a country, the total GDP of this region is $665 billion, the 20th largest in the world, just behind Switzerland (about $700 b).


This compares with favourably with Taiwan, which had a per capital GDP of $21,500 in 2015, with a total population of 23.5 million and a surface area of 36,000 sq km. The per capital GDP is also higher than that of Portugal or Greece (in nominal terms).







The area also boasts of rich history and culture, with plenty of ancient China heritage sites. Famous cities such as Nanjing (which served as the capital city before the PRC as well as several other dynasties) and Suzhou (famous for its classic Chinese gardens) are located in this region. Nanjing is still the "theoretical capital" of the Republic of China.
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Old 05-20-2016, 10:11 AM
 
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The numbers don't tell you the whole story.
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Old 05-20-2016, 12:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayesian View Post
The numbers don't tell you the whole story.
of course. Numbers never tell the whole story.
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Old 05-22-2016, 08:40 PM
 
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My guess would be Guangdong is the richest, followed by Jiangsu and Zhenjiang, but not in that particular order. I could be wrong.
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Old 05-23-2016, 01:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
My guess would be Guangdong is the richest, followed by Jiangsu and Zhenjiang, but not in that particular order. I could be wrong.
Guangdong has the highest GDP, but several counties in the mountains are still rather poor. Jiangsu and Zhejiang have no poor area.
Guangdong is more culturally diverse and open, while Jiangsu and Zhejiang have better schools and universities etc.
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Old 05-23-2016, 03:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
My guess would be Guangdong is the richest, followed by Jiangsu and Zhenjiang, but not in that particular order. I could be wrong.
No, in terms of per capita GDP, Guangdong was NEVER the richest.
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Old 05-23-2016, 04:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
No, in terms of per capita GDP, Guangdong was NEVER the richest.
Even historically I think the Jiangsu region was almost always the richest, don't know why.


Guangdong is full of factories producing cheap goods.
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Old 05-23-2016, 06:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by willister View Post
Even historically I think the Jiangsu region was almost always the richest, don't know why.


Guangdong is full of factories producing cheap goods.
Jiangsu is one of the best places for agriculture: flat, mild winter, rainy summer. It's connected to other provinces by rivers and canals.
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Old 05-24-2016, 07:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by willister View Post
Even historically I think the Jiangsu region was almost always the richest, don't know why.


Guangdong is full of factories producing cheap goods.
because ever since Song Dynasty, the economic centre had transitioned from the north to the south, which was the southern Jiangsu and Zhejiang area. Guangdong was pretty much a backwater for putting prisoners for hundreds of years. It was very common for the central government to demote a government official to Guangdong as a punishment. As pointed out, Jiangsu is almost completely flat, and is very ideal for agriculture. Business also prospered due to the completion of the Grand Canal. Educated had always led the entire country, in history, to the extent that half of those who won top positions at the national bureaucracy exam (at that time for 1000 years is the only way for poor kids to get top powers) were from Jiangsu and Zhejiang. Even today, it is most difficult for students from Jiangsu province to get into top universities because the competition is most fierce. Guangdong was never in a position to compete with that.

In terms per capita wealth, Guangdong even today only cracks number 5, after Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Inner Mongolia and Fujian. I have no idea why so many people think Guangdong is that rich. It has quite many poor and under developed areas, unlike Jiangsu, which eliminated poverty completely a few years ago before all others. Even the poorer two thirds of Jiangsu north of Yangtze River, which has a per capita GDP half of the southern 1/3, is almost as wealthy as Guangdong province on average.


Per capital GDP (2015) -nominal USD


Jiangsu: $14,145
Zhejiang: 12,469
Inner Mongolia: $11,561
Fujian: $10,962
Guangdong: $10,903
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Old 05-24-2016, 05:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
because ever since Song Dynasty, the economic centre had transitioned from the north to the south, which was the southern Jiangsu and Zhejiang area. Guangdong was pretty much a backwater for putting prisoners for hundreds of years. It was very common for the central government to demote a government official to Guangdong as a punishment. As pointed out, Jiangsu is almost completely flat, and is very ideal for agriculture. Business also prospered due to the completion of the Grand Canal. Educated had always led the entire country, in history, to the extent that half of those who won top positions at the national bureaucracy exam (at that time for 1000 years is the only way for poor kids to get top powers) were from Jiangsu and Zhejiang. Even today, it is most difficult for students from Jiangsu province to get into top universities because the competition is most fierce. Guangdong was never in a position to compete with that.

In terms per capita wealth, Guangdong even today only cracks number 5, after Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Inner Mongolia and Fujian. I have no idea why so many people think Guangdong is that rich. It has quite many poor and under developed areas, unlike Jiangsu, which eliminated poverty completely a few years ago before all others. Even the poorer two thirds of Jiangsu north of Yangtze River, which has a per capita GDP half of the southern 1/3, is almost as wealthy as Guangdong province on average.


Per capital GDP (2015) -nominal USD


Jiangsu: $14,145
Zhejiang: 12,469
Inner Mongolia: $11,561
Fujian: $10,962
Guangdong: $10,903
Probably because China is known as the factory of the world and that is where most of the factories are.


I always thought the out of favour governors were sent to Hainan?


Jiangsu was historically known for silk - a prized possession back in the day and to some extent, still is today.


If I was to guess before this thread I would have assumed Shanghai rather than Guangzhou.
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