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Old 08-08-2016, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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And how long is this arrangement supposed to last? What if they want to start a family of their own or go to school or travel? Is that the main reason they leave and go to Singapore, Indonesia, etc--to send money home for their families?
I'm trying to better understand the culture. Thank you.
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Old 08-08-2016, 08:24 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
And how long is this arrangement supposed to last? What if they want to start a family of their own or go to school or travel? Is that the main reason they leave and go to Singapore, Indonesia, etc--to send money home for their families?
I'm trying to better understand the culture. Thank you.
A lifetime or until the family is financially able to care for themselves. Most just consider it part of their budget, much like religious families who tithe budget it.

Is your daughter-in-law Filipino? If so, learn to accept it and get used to it. They have a more communal sense of wealth and property than we in the US have. She would not be able to emotionally handle what she would feel as abandoning her family, if she cut them off. However, that generally will not stop them from starting a family, if you are looking for grandkids.
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Old 08-08-2016, 08:46 AM
 
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In my opinion, many will see the OFW (overseas Filipino Worker) as being fortunate. Even those that are working in the most unfavorable conditions abroad are still viewed as being fortunate.

Family is very important and it's expected that you would share your good fortune with those that aren't so lucky.

From what I have witnessed, it does not end...ever.

Although the economy in the PI has been expanding at a good clip, it still relies heavily on remittances from the OFWs, they're third in remittance dollars according to this article: Third highest worlwide, OFW remittances seen to hit $29.7 B in 2015 | Business, News, The Philippine Star | philstar.com

Of course as the economy grows and a higher percentage of GDP is initiated "in country" this practice will become less common but don't look for it any time soon.
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Old 08-08-2016, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Elysium
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You can still see in the popular fiction the OFW has a hero status. Leaving their families to help the homeland, through remittances to the family. Current House of Representatives member and a former Governor Vilma Santos one of the biggest stars from the 80s last biggest roles was as a hero mother who went to Hong Kong to work as a domestic helper as they honored the sacrifices that family went through.

Family is expected to kick in to support each other. Someone 18 does not move out as in America but stays at home and aids in the cost of educating younger siblings. Those that do go out alone face the opposite prejudice an American young person does. They will be seen as loners and not family minded and a potential spouse. If you should move to a city for work you move in with the aunt or uncles family if there is one there already and send part of the income back to the province. That doesn't change if you happen to be in another country and not just another island.

Last edited by Taiko; 08-08-2016 at 11:22 AM..
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Old 08-08-2016, 11:03 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taiko View Post
You can still see in the popular fiction the OFW has a hero status. Leaving their families to help the homeland, through remittances to the family. Current House of Representatives member and a former Governor Vilma Santos one of the biggest stars from the 80s last biggest roles was as a hero mother who went to Hong Kong to work as a domestic helper as they honored the sacrifices that family went through.

Family is expected to kick in to support each other. Someone 18 does not move out as in America but stays at home and aids in the cost of educating younger siblings. Those that do go out along face the opposite prejudice an American young person does. They will be seen as loners and not family minded and a potential spouse. If you should move to a city for work you move in with the aunt or uncles family if there is one there already and send part of the income back to the province. That doesn't change if you happen to be in another country and not just another island.
Well said Taiko.

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Old 08-08-2016, 12:26 PM
 
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Yeah, Filipino's are very family oriented. It's not surprising if children live or live near their parents and also grandparents. Communal is the right word. Also remember most filipino's are not wealthy. Many are poor or have simple lifestyles. Children want to give back to their parents. They want to take care of their relatives. Nursing homes are not popular there. Contrast to Americans that often forget their elderly and are very individualistic.
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Old 08-09-2016, 12:44 AM
 
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Are most ex pats from The Philippines expected to send their earnings home?


Yes, or it was the reason they choose to work overseas.
Another reason is they can earn more by working overseas.


Other countries with a lot of people working overseas include Indonesia and South Asian countries. Billions of Chinese also work internally in other provinces to send earnings home.


The result is long duration of seperation from spouses and children.
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Old 08-09-2016, 09:52 AM
 
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for the OP, if you are thinking of expats just like those sent by multinational companies in other countries, yes, they are expected to send home their salaries because their families are still in the Philippines. we call them Overseas Workers. their families maybe with them but they are still going back in the Philippines after their contracts are finished.


for those immigrants in Western Countries, the support is limited to siblings who are still studying and whether the immigrant is still single. once the immigrant gets married or the siblings get married, the support only goes to the parents. but there are those who try to help everyone in the family whether they are married or not and this is really the problem. some spouses are open minded and some are not. personally, I don't like it also and don't do it.


but as I said, the above are the exception. most just take care of their own families and just send some if they are feeling generous
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Old 08-09-2016, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,738,878 times
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Thank you everyone for your answers. This helps a lot.
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Old 08-09-2016, 09:17 PM
 
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not just send home their income, but are expected to bring home a lot of gifts/excess money for gifts when they are visiting/returning home. even strangers will knock on the door and explain they're somewhat relatives to you and you should dole them out some money since you came home from overseas. the worst time of the year to be home is christmas, when everyone is expecting to be gifted with something. and when the immigrant is the most lonely being away from family at that time of the year.

right now, my mom is expecting me to help a cousin of mine go to school, like how i did with another cousin who has now a pretty decent job in qatar. she understands that that might cause me to cut down on some of my aid to her and my dad directly, but that she'd rather not want that kid to lose potential development by dropping out from school.
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