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Old 11-24-2016, 12:03 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
A more interesting question would be if a pure blooded Native American went to somewhere like China or the Philippines and the Native American didn't say where they were from, where would the Chinese or Filipinos think they are from?
Some light-skinned native Americans (mainly from Canada and Alaska) may be able to blend in Chinese population, but most cannot.
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Old 11-24-2016, 12:51 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
A more interesting question would be if a pure blooded Native American went to somewhere like China or the Philippines and the Native American didn't say where they were from, where would the Chinese or Filipinos think they are from?
Navajos walk right up to visiting Tibetans and start speaking in Navajo. That should tell you something. There was a Navajo woman who was visiting Tibet sometime in the last 20 years or so, and she happened to be there when there was a big protest incident. She got caught in the police sweep of the area, and ended up in jail with the Tibetans. The Chinese thought she was one of them. In short order, she learned to speak Tibetan (the structure of Navajo and Tibetan has similarities, and some of the vocabulary is similar.) She did get out, after a couple of weeks.

It really depends on the Native Americans (there's a lot of variety between tribes, you know), though, and on the Asians. Some Mongolic people don't blend in with (some) Native Americans, others do. But I can tell you, they get stared at a lot by Native Americans, as if the Native Americans are trying to figure out where they're from, trying to figure out "are they one of us, or not".
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Old 11-25-2016, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
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I am Taiwanese-American. I do have darker complexion than the average Taiwanese person (and often mistaken for being Filipino by non-Asians, Asians and even Filipinos). I remember in the early 1990's, my older brother and I were driving from California to Pennsylvania, doing a cross country drive. My older brother was essentially driving his car back to start his second year of medical school at the time. One of the places we stopped was in Oklahoma. I remember we just checked into our hotel then walk back down to the parking lot to go to our car to get some dinner and a Native American man comes up to me and asked me what tribe am I from. I think was also drunk, as I could smell alcohol in his breath. But, needless to say I think, he was not used to seeing many people who were neither white nor black. And I guess he assumed any person with straight black hair, higher cheekbones, tan complexion would be a Native American. Plus, there aren't that many people of East Asian background that lives in Oklahoma. So, I was not floored by that question. I think I would be more floored if I got that question in the LA area or other major metro areas of the US with a sizable East Asian population.

While if a Native American were to visit East Asia, not sure what ethnicity they would think they are. If they did not look Eskimo or Aleutian, but look more like a Navajo or others, I think people could guess they are not East Asian. They could think they are Filipino or from Latin America, or even Pacific Islander (that would be my guess). I know some Mestizos (there are many in Mexico which means they are descendant of European- mainly Spanish and Native American)- where some mistaken them for even being Middle Eastern or East Indian.
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Old 11-25-2016, 02:23 PM
 
Location: NYC
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American native Indians have similar features to other Aboriginals in Asia. They cannot blend in easily because Asia has it's own racial problems between different ethnic groups.
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Old 11-26-2016, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Canada
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I live in Manitoba, Canada. We have one of the highest Native populations in Canada. There is also a lot of Asians here, mainly Filipinos followed by Chinese and Vietnamese. Maybe it's because I am used to seeing them, but rarely do people ever get them mixed up, it is pretty easy to tell them apart.
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Old 12-02-2016, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
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Not long ago, I talked to a woman who is full-blood Salish here in GZ; her husband is white and works for the US consulate. I pretty much immediately pegged her as native (I spent most of my childhood in the PNW);, but she said that people here usually thought she was Indian, Filipino, or Indonesian, or rarely (usually from people engaged in trade), that she was from a Latin American country. Their last post was in Peru, and she said she fit right in there and people were shocked if she didnt speak Spanish or a local dialect.

The North Dakota pipeline standoff has gotten some press here since it shows America in a negative light, but I don't think it has raised much awareness among people. I think that a lot of people here would assume a Native American to look more like a hapa, i.e. a mix of Western and Asiatic features. I recall in one of the Japanese fighting games I use to play on PlayStation, don't remember which, they had a character who was a Native American. He had blue eyes, medium skin tone, and brown hair, and wore a weird Native American/Viking-mix outfit.
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Old 12-04-2016, 11:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by twnxn View Post
As what others wrote, I what I was getting at in my prior post, Asians/East Asians in Asia do not think about Native Americans in general. And if they don't feel a sense of kinship among themselves (Chinese, Taiwanese, Koreans, Japanese, Vietnamese, etc.) then how could they have a sense of kinship with people more distant like the Native Americans?

However, here in the US it could be a different story- especially among Asian-Americans who grew up in the US. They may more likely identify themselves as "Asian-American" or "Asian" on top of their specific ethnic backgrounds. While those in Asia, usually only identify with their specific ethnic background than as Asian. And those Asian-Americans who grew up in the US may (not all, but some) show empathy towards Native-Americans (not so much because they have "Mongoloid features"), but because they are also a minority and non-white.
From what I have seen, I don't think those who grew up in the US think about this topic differently. Alot of people don't even know that Native Americans have this historical connection to Asia.
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Old 12-04-2016, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
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What people do not realize as that the "neo-Mongoloid" features which is most prevalent in East Asia- China, Japan, Korea, large portion of Taiwan did not first appear until 10,000 years ago per many sources. Prior to that the people residing in East Asia had different features perhaps closer to what present Ainu in Japan looked like. The first people to reside in East Asia had YDNA C and D. At present, most in East Asia have various sub-clades of YDNA O (though Japan also has YDNA D from the earlier Jomon people with the YDNA O coming from the later Yayoi who came to Japan from what is now Korea and parts of China).

The Native Americans per sources first came to the Americas sometime people around 12,000 to 13,000 years ago. They travelled through the Americas from Siberia. 12,000-13,000 years ago the prevalent neo-Mongoloid features was not prevalent in East Asia. Additionally, many Native Americans are largely YDNA Q. Q derived from YDNA P which in turn came from K2b, while YDNA O of East Asia derived from YDNA K2a. Both K2a and K2b derived from YDNA K which was probably in India/Central Asia. The Native Americans features maybe more proto-Mongoloid. Keep in mind, many Europeans have YDNA R which also derived from YDNA P which Q (many Native Americans have )- thus they have common ancestry that probably split in Central Asia which R moving west towards Europe and others moving to India and Q splitting off going to Siberia and making its way to the Americas. I would say the ancestral YDNA P was "proto" and could have retain features of the YDNA K which was ancestral to YDNA R (Europeans and people of Northern India), Q (largely Native American) and O (largely East Asians).

I can also talk about the YDNA C3 of Mongolians and how it is prevalent in Mongolia, Kazakhstan, was wells as Northwestern part of North America (see the map link below)...

See: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...aplogroups.png

See: Who Were The First Americans?

See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinodonty_and_Sundadonty
Sinodonty is more associated with people in East Asia with neo-Mongoloid features (except the Ainu) while Sundandonty is more associated with Southeast Asia (Sinodonty derived from Sundadonty which is older in feature).

See: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YRJmCAohYX...sundadonts.png

See: http://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/cgi/...ontext=humbiol

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol...oto-Mongoloids

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongoloid#Neoteny

Last edited by twnxn; 12-04-2016 at 12:40 PM..
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Old 12-04-2016, 02:23 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twnxn View Post
What people do not realize as that the "neo-Mongoloid" features which is most prevalent in East Asia- China, Japan, Korea, large portion of Taiwan did not first appear until 10,000 years ago per many sources. Prior to that the people residing in East Asia had different features perhaps closer to what present Ainu in Japan looked like. The first people to reside in East Asia had YDNA C and D. At present, most in East Asia have various sub-clades of YDNA O (though Japan also has YDNA D from the earlier Jomon people with the YDNA O coming from the later Yayoi who came to Japan from what is now Korea and parts of China).
And "D" is the "negrito" Hg, is it not? D, aside from being part of the Ainu genome, is also of higher frequency among Tibetans. Individuals of short stature with frizzy, not straight, hair and broader, flatter noses than other Tibetans, can be spotted in Tibetan communities today. And then there are the Black hill tribes in Vietnam, the Philippines and the Andaman Islands, speaking of First Peoples.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 12-04-2016 at 02:42 PM..
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Old 12-04-2016, 02:24 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twnxn View Post
I am Taiwanese-American. I do have darker complexion than the average Taiwanese person (and often mistaken for being Filipino by non-Asians, Asians and even Filipinos)..
Are you Han Chinese, or aboriginal Taiwanese/Austronesian?
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