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Old 11-04-2016, 12:10 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Native Americans are originally from Asia that crossed over the land bridge from Siberia to Alaska tens of thousands of years ago. Many still retain some mongoloid features: thin eyes, straight black hair, broad faces and heads.

So do Asians learn about this in school and do they feel a special kinship with Native Americans?
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Old 11-04-2016, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
So do Asians learn about this in school?
I think only those in Japan, South Korea, China and Singapore.
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Old 11-04-2016, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
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I think when studying American history and history of the Americans, the East Asians may learn about the Native Americans.

As to whether they feel a kinship with the Native Americans because of their "Mongoloid features"- I think that is an individual by individual response. Thus, I will not speak for all Asian. I am of East Asian descent- I will venture to add that if Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese, Koreans, Vietnamese, etc. do not feel a sense of kinship (and these people are more closely related to each other than with Native Americans), I would only venture to say they do not feel a since of kinship with Native Americans. I won't get into detailed discussions about genetics and DNA, but they are actually more distant. YDNA is something passed down from father to son and all along the male lines. East Asians are largely different sub-cladesof YDNA O and maybe some YDNA C and YDNA D to a lesser extent. While Native Americans are largely YDNA Q. There are small numbers in China with YDNA Q but a different subclade than the YDNA Q of Native Americans.
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Old 11-04-2016, 07:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
Native Americans are originally from Asia that crossed over the land bridge from Siberia to Alaska tens of thousands of years ago. Many still retain some mongoloid features: thin eyes, straight black hair, broad faces and heads.

So do Asians learn about this in school and do they feel a special kinship with Native Americans?
Quote:
Originally Posted by twnxn View Post
I think when studying American history and history of the Americans, the East Asians may learn about the Native Americans.

As to whether they feel a kinship with the Native Americans because of their "Mongoloid features"- I think that is an individual by individual response. Thus, I will not speak for all Asian. I am of East Asian descent- I will venture to add that if Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese, Koreans, Vietnamese, etc. do not feel a sense of kinship (and these people are more closely related to each other than with Native Americans), I would only venture to say they do not feel a since of kinship with Native Americans. I won't get into detailed discussions about genetics and DNA, but they are actually more distant. YDNA is something passed down from father to son and all along the male lines. East Asians are largely different sub-cladesof YDNA O and maybe some YDNA C and YDNA D to a lesser extent. While Native Americans are largely YDNA Q. There are small numbers in China with YDNA Q but a different subclade than the YDNA Q of Native Americans.
They don't. I'm almost 1/5 Native American (most of that traced back to northern Japan, the Kuril Islands, and Mongolia), and most of the responses I got when I was in Japan was, "are you mixed Japanese?"
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Old 11-04-2016, 07:49 PM
 
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Arrow Human population was reduced to 5,000 last ice age

According to the genetic bottleneck theory, between 50,000 and 100,000 years ago, human populations sharply decreased to 3,00010,000 surviving individuals. This was around the onset of the last ice age when the supereruption of Mt Toba in Indonesia plunged the earth into 6 years of volcanic winter.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toba_catastrophe_theory

Now we know we are from the same DNA

Human Family Tree | The Smithsonian Institution's Human Origins Program
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Old 11-04-2016, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Taipei
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What do Asians think about Native Americans?

Well it's easy, we just don't think about Native Americans.
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Old 11-05-2016, 01:38 PM
 
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They don't.

Because even within Asian countries, they don't even feel kinship to one another... So why would they feel kinship to Native Americans???

(Eg. Even within Chinese themselves.. like HK, Mainland n Taiwan.. not necessarily get along and feel kinship.
Or Japan n China.. lots of old scars. Or Koreans n Japanese.. etc.)
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Old 11-06-2016, 08:58 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Yeah, now that I think about it, Asians generally do not think of race like we do in the West. They're more concern about national or ethnic differences.
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Old 11-06-2016, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
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As what others wrote, I what I was getting at in my prior post, Asians/East Asians in Asia do not think about Native Americans in general. And if they don't feel a sense of kinship among themselves (Chinese, Taiwanese, Koreans, Japanese, Vietnamese, etc.) then how could they have a sense of kinship with people more distant like the Native Americans?

However, here in the US it could be a different story- especially among Asian-Americans who grew up in the US. They may more likely identify themselves as "Asian-American" or "Asian" on top of their specific ethnic backgrounds. While those in Asia, usually only identify with their specific ethnic background than as Asian. And those Asian-Americans who grew up in the US may (not all, but some) show empathy towards Native-Americans (not so much because they have "Mongoloid features"), but because they are also a minority and non-white.
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Old 11-06-2016, 12:50 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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It depends on the Asians. North Asians (Siberians) do. Some have participated in DNA studies related to this question, or they've seen scientists visiting their village to take DNA samples. And after 1990, visits and collaborations on a professional level, and cultural exchanges, between Native Americans and north Asians began to take place, and to increase in frequency.

Quite a few articles were published in the Mongol area of Siberia, and in Mongolia, about DNA studies that traced the roots of some Native Americans to the Mongol region. Other studies found a DNA connection coming from the Amur River region in the Russian Far East, where the Manchu-speaking peoples live. The peoples living in those regions and on Kamchatka are well aware of the connection, and have individuals who have visited the US many times to connect with Native Americans.

You'd be surprised how many Navajos have been to Mongolia and/or Tibet. They feel at home in areas where people live in yurts and live by herding sheep and horses. They pick up the languages easily, as Athabaskan languages are similar structurally to some Asian languages. And linguistic and genetic studies have now tied the Ket tribe, the last remaining one of a language family called Yeniseian (after the Yenisei River in Siberia) to the Athabaskan family of peoples in North America. There's been at least one delegation of Kets to Alaska, to meet with their distant cousins.

You never know what's going on in the Native world until you ask.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 11-06-2016 at 01:05 PM..
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