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Old 02-13-2017, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,517 posts, read 5,459,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willister View Post
Thanks for the correction.


With the Mainland Chinese emigrating, really, most in the West are now Cantonese?
In Australias case Mandarin replaced Cantonese as the main Chinese language about 10 years ago.
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Old 02-14-2017, 03:14 PM
 
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In Chinatowns of American cities, you can speak Mandarin in all the places now.
Cantonese and Mandarin are not that different to begin with. A speaker of one of them only needs several months' adaptation to be able to understand the other, if they are motivated.
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Old 02-14-2017, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Taipei
6,774 posts, read 5,122,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
In Chinatowns of American cities, you can speak Mandarin in all the places now.
Cantonese and Mandarin are not that different to begin with. A speaker of one of them only needs several months' adaptation to be able to understand the other, if they are motivated.
They are about as similar as say Italian and French, so I'd say that they are very different.
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Old 02-15-2017, 01:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
They are about as similar as say Italian and French, so I'd say that they are very different.
Closer than that. Vocabulary and grammar are very similar.
The mapping rules in phonology are not that difficult either.

In fact Cantonese is easier to learn than Shanghainese, though it sounds more daunting at beginning.
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Old 02-15-2017, 09:27 PM
 
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More than half of the American, Canadian, British and Australian born Chinese cannot read and write Chinese.
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Old 02-16-2017, 09:43 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 2,078,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vmodeb View Post
More than half of the American, Canadian, British and Australian born Chinese cannot read and write Chinese.
that's not surprising. Chinese in the Philippines for years have their own schools and yet could not retain what they learned. its only lately, when China is becoming rich that they are trying to learn harder so that they could speak and write Mandarin. don't know if its effective because, still the most important part of learning is environment. once you go out from your school or home, you still interact with the outside world most of the time.


so how much more if you just go after school? and thats not even everyday?
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Old 02-19-2017, 03:58 PM
 
276 posts, read 204,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
There are lots of mainland Chinese emigrating, but lots of them actually go back after getting a passport.

Most Chinatowns in the West started with the railroad construction. Many of the laborers were from Guangdong, specifically Taishan area. For a while, Taishanese (closely related but not exactly easily intelligible with standard Cantonese as spoken in Guangzhou and Hong Kong) was the lingua franca in these Chinatowns. Gradually, it was supplanted with standard Cantonese, with a big emigration wave prior to the 1997 Hong Kong handover.

Depending whether most mainland Chinese move to the same places and if they will stay, the lingua franca will indeed slowly shift to Mandarin, just like Singapore. There is more Mandarin in Silicon Valley now compared to Cantonese. Aside from mainland Chinese emigration, the shift started due to many Taiwanese in the area. Most are there due to their involvement in the semi-conductor industry.
Not quite. Going back really depends on what social economic level they are at. The richer ones will grab the Western passport and Permanent Residence and then usually the husband flies back to China to do business.


Wife will stay in said Western country and live as a tai tai (rich man's wife), kids will grow up in Western society speaking flawless English and living a Western lifestyle.
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Old 02-22-2017, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
9,876 posts, read 6,616,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
There are lots of mainland Chinese emigrating, but lots of them actually go back after getting a passport.

Most Chinatowns in the West started with the railroad construction. Many of the laborers were from Guangdong, specifically Taishan area. For a while, Taishanese (closely related but not exactly easily intelligible with standard Cantonese as spoken in Guangzhou and Hong Kong) was the lingua franca in these Chinatowns. Gradually, it was supplanted with standard Cantonese, with a big emigration wave prior to the 1997 Hong Kong handover.

Depending whether most mainland Chinese move to the same places and if they will stay, the lingua franca will indeed slowly shift to Mandarin, just like Singapore. There is more Mandarin in Silicon Valley now compared to Cantonese. Aside from mainland Chinese emigration, the shift started due to many Taiwanese in the area. Most are there due to their involvement in the semi-conductor industry.
Perhaps, but many are staying - if they have children (who grow up in the host country and may be disadvantaged by returning to China).

Yes, I live in Silicon Valley and it's more Mandarin speaking - yes, often in part due to the Taiwanese immigrants who settled there years ago (my parents were part of that diaspora).

Vancouver is largely Cantonese (thanks to the 1997-related HK exodus) but it's becoming more Mandarin speaking in recent years due to the influx of mainland Chinese.

In NYC - in lower Manhattan's Chinatown, you'll hear more Fujianese dialect being spoken these days.
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Old 02-23-2017, 02:21 AM
 
569 posts, read 372,958 times
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I recieve anyone who speaks Folklore as a threat.


You see, the Mandarine was designated as the official dialect for the people. Yet, they still spoke Folklore. It was rebellious to their necks. I could not recieve a person who had no regard for the other people but their traditions.


I spake Folklore, because it was the scholarly effort. It was part of the secondary interest of knowing my extended family better. The folklore was a completely mess. Totally wild that I would conclude for you. Let me conclude it this way for you: The humans and apes all walk altogether.


I don't believe the Mainland Chinese still speak Folklores. The very remote parts and the old people would do. But the youngsters are not aquentain with them, because the school don't use them. Therefore, please consider the folklore speakers are dangerous for your safety sakes.


And this is another input from me concerning this topic.
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Old 02-25-2017, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
9,876 posts, read 6,616,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CPPU12345 View Post
I recieve anyone who speaks Folklore as a threat.


You see, the Mandarine was designated as the official dialect for the people. Yet, they still spoke Folklore. It was rebellious to their necks. I could not recieve a person who had no regard for the other people but their traditions.


I spake Folklore, because it was the scholarly effort. It was part of the secondary interest of knowing my extended family better. The folklore was a completely mess. Totally wild that I would conclude for you. Let me conclude it this way for you: The humans and apes all walk altogether.


I don't believe the Mainland Chinese still speak Folklores. The very remote parts and the old people would do. But the youngsters are not aquentain with them, because the school don't use them. Therefore, please consider the folklore speakers are dangerous for your safety sakes.


And this is another input from me concerning this topic.
Huh? What's "Folklore"? Do you really mean "dialect"?
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