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Old 03-22-2017, 10:33 PM
 
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What about the near-lack of terrorist attacks? Would that also be one of things most missed about life in Asia?
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Old 03-22-2017, 11:06 PM
 
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I've traveled to Korea, Hong Kong and Guam, but I only really know Japan. I miss Lawson 100 and other places where you could shop cheap, without really sacrificing quality. Japan in general is tailored to being frugal, and spending only what you need to spend. I saved money like a madman, and still lived great in an awesome city with tons of things to do.
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Old 03-22-2017, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Taipei
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Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Not sure what kind of job i could do in Taiwan, teaching Western history mixed with some topography to 10-12 year olds? Is that job allowed in Taiwan for foreigners? I don't have a degree for it but i think i know enough about it for kids in that age bracket.
No there isn't. There's no job here for foreigners apart from English teachers from English speaking countries who has a college degree.
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Old 03-23-2017, 03:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nc17 View Post
I've traveled to Korea, Hong Kong and Guam, but I only really know Japan. I miss Lawson 100 and other places where you could shop cheap, without really sacrificing quality. Japan in general is tailored to being frugal, and spending only what you need to spend. I saved money like a madman, and still lived great in an awesome city with tons of things to do.
During its heyday, I've always felt Japan and Japanese products offered the best value for money without being over the top or sacrificing on quality. These days, that crown probably belongs to South Korea.
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Old 03-23-2017, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pennsylvania / Dull Germany
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What do I miss about Asia - especially referring to Korea and Japan - well there are several things.

One is certainly food.

Another is decent and kind behaviour of people. People are not smoking on the street in front of you, blowing all the smoke into your face. People are service-oriented and friendly while maintaining a very professional level. People are not shouting around that much, people are not begging around. People do not throw garbage around. People do not bully and jostle in public transport. Just what I would expect from any educated human being, but what has been lost in Europe.

I also miss the efficient infrastructure, trains that actually run on time. I miss that there are no tourist traps, some idiots trying to cheat on you, just because you are a foreigner (which is totally different in SE Asia or China though) and people are not expecting tips. And I like the safety, especially in Korea. You can leave your notebook or tablet on the table in a cafe and go to the restroom, to the lunch restaurant next door, or do some phone calls outside, without anyone trying to steal your belongings. People are honest and respectful.
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Old 03-23-2017, 08:14 AM
 
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I'm moving back to China at the end of the year. I miss the food, energy of the cities, entertainment like KTVs and bars, friendliness of the people, and I know I mentioned food, but I really miss the late night food markets, sitting outside eating and drinking is always a great time.

I don't look forward to the pollution and all the smoking can get to me from time to time, but none of my friends there smoke so that's a plus.
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Old 03-23-2017, 03:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
I'm moving back to China at the end of the year. I miss the food, energy of the cities, entertainment like KTVs and bars, friendliness of the people, and I know I mentioned food, but I really miss the late night food markets, sitting outside eating and drinking is always a great time.

I don't look forward to the pollution and all the smoking can get to me from time to time, but none of my friends there smoke so that's a plus.
You should go to South China, especially some tier 2 cities. Much less pollution and still good life.
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Old 03-23-2017, 05:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by OZpharmer View Post
What about the near-lack of terrorist attacks? Would that also be one of things most missed about life in Asia?
Yep, completely safe - at all times day and night. Something to do 24X7, close to other places in Asia.
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Old 03-23-2017, 06:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
You should go to South China, especially some tier 2 cities. Much less pollution and still good life.
I just got back from a week in Yunnan and it is very beautiful there, clean air, and good weather. But we will be moving to my wife's hometown which is in Henan. Pretty bad pollution there and it's one of the poorer regions of China. The weather is not very good, but very similar to Kansas which is where I am from. We own a restaurant and I used to have a landscaping company here (Kansas), we will be opening a business in her town, some sort of Western themed coffee shop, restaurant, or maybe a bar aimed at locals, as there are almost no foreigners there. I don't know the tier system, but I imagine it's at the bottom... I've also been to Shanghai, Beijing, Hainan, and a little bit around Jiangsu. But most of the time I've been in Henan.
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Old 03-24-2017, 08:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by willister View Post
Sadly, for me, it's not so much what I miss, but the way it is developing, I think in my home country (Vietnam), Ho Chi Minh City is just becoming an increasingly a concrete jungle with even MORE apartments growing up.


It's funny, I'm proud it's developing since my first visit in 1995 - pretty much a underdeveloped shack at that stage. At the same time, a lot of the cultural aspects is gone, weird as it sounds I don't so much mind the jostling, pushing and whole thousands of motorbikes on the road in relentless heat.


The more developed and cleaned up a city becomes, the more boring, rep taped city it becomes, hence, just like any rubber stamped city.
I suppose from our perspective, living in the developed West, it is somewhat disheartening to see economic progress coming at the expense of certain aspects of traditional culture. But I imagine for locals who endured the poverty-stricken hardships of life in undeveloped VN immediately after the War, it is a trade-off they are willing to take - to a certain degree.

I posed this same concern to my local Hanoian guide during one visit back, when the country was in the midst of this rapid transformation in early 2000's. He was a very thoughtful, intelligent, sincere, honest person. As you may know, immediately after the Vietnam War the country underwent severe famine and economic hardship, partially brought on by infrastructural damage from years of warfare, depletion of agricultural capabilities, social and governmental upheaval, and the US/ Western Allies embargo.

My guide recounted how, as a child, he and his family gathered around the empty rice storage container crying from hunger. He replied that the positives to QOL brought by rapid development from capitalism outweighed the negative effects on traditional culture. Once they have achieved a certain level of basic QOL (food, shelter, infrastructure, etc) he stated, they will focus more on trying to retain the cultural aspects.
So, I guess from his perspective, it was a trade-off he was willing to take.

But will economic 'progress' be something that can be controlled, or will it become a runaway train that runs over everything that impedes its continuing growth, including traditional culture?
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