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Old 02-13-2017, 06:15 PM
 
276 posts, read 204,619 times
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Sadly, for me, it's not so much what I miss, but the way it is developing, I think in my home country (Vietnam), Ho Chi Minh City is just becoming an increasingly a concrete jungle with even MORE apartments growing up.


It's funny, I'm proud it's developing since my first visit in 1995 - pretty much a underdeveloped shack at that stage. At the same time, a lot of the cultural aspects is gone, weird as it sounds I don't so much mind the jostling, pushing and whole thousands of motorbikes on the road in relentless heat.


The more developed and cleaned up a city becomes, the more boring, rep taped city it becomes, hence, just like any rubber stamped city.
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Old 02-14-2017, 03:17 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,258,456 times
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That is a dilemma most developing countries face. It is very easy to argue for the preservation of old buildings and tradition from a western perspective, because they don't live in Asia, but those countries need to grow, and this often comes at high cost of losing those history and tradition we think are important. I am not saying most countries are striking a good balance, but it is wrong for actual residents and the governments there to consider more about economic prospects and jobs than protecting culture.

Speaking of "concrete jungles" - what's the alternatives?

1) low rise tree lines suburban homes in North America? No, it is not practical, nor is it good and sustainable lifestyle, because that means billions of Asians would need to drive every day for every thing. Think about that.

2) great modern buildings at high architecture value? It is not financially possible for every building to have good design. Nor do the residents care about their exterior.

3) European style dense but midrise apartments? That would be ideal but I am afraid land value in many Asian cities are to high for 6 story apartments. This is probably why even Europe is not building many of those any more except in the cheaper suburbs.

But in general I agree Asians cities are becoming more boring. What I dislike more is everyone wants live just like an American, with all the boring malls, fast food and generic shopping, and cars. On the surface life gets "better" because one "owns" more stuff, but I am not sure life in general has become that much more pleasant.
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Old 02-14-2017, 05:23 PM
 
276 posts, read 204,619 times
Reputation: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
That is a dilemma most developing countries face. It is very easy to argue for the preservation of old buildings and tradition from a western perspective, because they don't live in Asia, but those countries need to grow, and this often comes at high cost of losing those history and tradition we think are important. I am not saying most countries are striking a good balance, but it is wrong for actual residents and the governments there to consider more about economic prospects and jobs than protecting culture.

Speaking of "concrete jungles" - what's the alternatives?

1) low rise tree lines suburban homes in North America? No, it is not practical, nor is it good and sustainable lifestyle, because that means billions of Asians would need to drive every day for every thing. Think about that.

2) great modern buildings at high architecture value? It is not financially possible for every building to have good design. Nor do the residents care about their exterior.

3) European style dense but midrise apartments? That would be ideal but I am afraid land value in many Asian cities are to high for 6 story apartments. This is probably why even Europe is not building many of those any more except in the cheaper suburbs.

But in general I agree Asians cities are becoming more boring. What I dislike more is everyone wants live just like an American, with all the boring malls, fast food and generic shopping, and cars. On the surface life gets "better" because one "owns" more stuff, but I am not sure life in general has become that much more pleasant.
I think the answer is ultimately something like a Tokyo for mega cities, OK it's not going to happen and is not really achievable for most, but that "model" if you like suits Asian cities - small, overcrowded. Encourage bikes for CBD travel (probably 80% of the time for most).


It's the irony of development in Asia, the more developed the country is, the more the cultural aspect is taken away. For example the iconic dai pai dongs - gone because they were filthy street food vendors in HK, bad image, but actually they're cultural icon, a lot of HKers miss those food stalls.
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:23 AM
 
654 posts, read 582,148 times
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Walkability is what I would miss the most if I had to move out of Asia, as well as the fast paced interesting life of living in a big city ( Guangzhou/Shanghai China). America is a great and comfortable county to live in, but the idea of having to get in my car and drive everything sounds horrible. Also, I kind of like the idea of living in an apartment building as opposed to a large single family home like in the U.S. The idea of having neighbors that you talk to is kind of nice.
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,119,529 times
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It completely depends on which part of Asia is referred to. If it's Japan then probably a lot of things, but Bangladesh and Syria are a whole other story.

Let's see, if I had to move out (to a better country, which would be ****ing awesome by the way), I would probably miss the people I know and the lack of dress code, other than those I wouldn't miss any-****ing-thing. My detest towards this ****ing ****hole only grows as days go by.
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Old 03-19-2017, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,151 posts, read 950,468 times
Reputation: 1291
JakeinChina's last post prompts me to ask a question. Perhaps anyone's answer would depend on exactly where they live, i dunno.

I have a Chinese friend who currently lives in a Macao high-rise and he says he doesn't know any of his neighbors. (I should add that he speaks Mandarin, but not Cantonese.) Recently, I spent 2 weeks there and I did notice that people kept to themselves, although they were courteous in the lobby and elevators. But, no friendly chit-chat.

Is that also typical of other large cities in China and the region around it?
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Old 03-20-2017, 05:40 AM
 
4 posts, read 2,651 times
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I miss food and the craziness of Thailand.. Hope I will be able to go back
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,119,529 times
Reputation: 4565
Quote:
Originally Posted by madrone2k View Post
JakeinChina's last post prompts me to ask a question. Perhaps anyone's answer would depend on exactly where they live, i dunno.

I have a Chinese friend who currently lives in a Macao high-rise and he says he doesn't know any of his neighbors. (I should add that he speaks Mandarin, but not Cantonese.) Recently, I spent 2 weeks there and I did notice that people kept to themselves, although they were courteous in the lobby and elevators. But, no friendly chit-chat.

Is that also typical of other large cities in China and the region around it?
Yes it is typical in the region.

Actually I feel like only Americans do friendly chit-chat with neighbours.
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,159,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Walkability is what I would miss the most if I had to move out of Asia, as well as the fast paced interesting life of living in a big city ( Guangzhou/Shanghai China). America is a great and comfortable county to live in, but the idea of having to get in my car and drive everything sounds horrible. Also, I kind of like the idea of living in an apartment building as opposed to a large single family home like in the U.S. The idea of having neighbors that you talk to is kind of nice.
Yep, I like that too. I like being able to easily walk to hundreds of different restaurant choices, stores, etc.
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,159,509 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by madrone2k View Post
JakeinChina's last post prompts me to ask a question. Perhaps anyone's answer would depend on exactly where they live, i dunno.

I have a Chinese friend who currently lives in a Macao high-rise and he says he doesn't know any of his neighbors. (I should add that he speaks Mandarin, but not Cantonese.) Recently, I spent 2 weeks there and I did notice that people kept to themselves, although they were courteous in the lobby and elevators. But, no friendly chit-chat.

Is that also typical of other large cities in China and the region around it?
Friendly chit-chat isn't common in any large city. You'd never be able to do anything, as you are going to see people all the time, everywhere.

Of course, people DO engage, but not to everyone. I live in Macau, and I'll talk to people that I see, that I want to talk to. Sometimes for a good 10 minutes or so. But, GENERALLY, when you live in any city (American ones included), you don't chit-chat with every person you see. If you did, you wouldn't be able to get to work on time, get home from work on time for dinner, etc. It's just not possible.

But, if you see people you know, and you like, and you want to talk to, of course you chit-chat, just like you would anywhere else.
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