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Old 05-17-2017, 01:19 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
You will not struggle at all. Just make sure you get your residence permit and work permit with the help of the school/institution and you'll be fine. You have a lot of fun being young and exploring Chengdu, Sichuan and the rest of China. Its a beautiful country and is much more interesting and happening then the U.S. these days.
What about clarifying whether the contract means 40 hrs./week of straight teaching (that's a bit much), or if it's maybe 4-5 hrs. of teaching, with a few hrs. of prep time, teacher meetings, misc. admin tasks? Seems he should clarify what the 40 hrs. comprise, and if it's all teaching (hard to believe), maybe he should negotiate for 30 hrs. at the same pay?
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Old 05-17-2017, 08:20 PM
 
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Yeah that's a great point Ruth. The thing is, you want to be able to have fewer teaching hours and more time to do tutoring privately. Teachers tutor kids for 30 to 50 USD per hour. That adds up to a lot of extra income each month. I would ask them to clarify the teaching hours. 40 hours is a lot.
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Old 05-19-2017, 03:11 AM
 
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Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Yeah that's a great point Ruth. The thing is, you want to be able to have fewer teaching hours and more time to do tutoring privately. Teachers tutor kids for 30 to 50 USD per hour. That adds up to a lot of extra income each month. I would ask them to clarify the teaching hours. 40 hours is a lot.
It is impossible to teach 40 hours. No teacher teaches that many hours. China has a 40 hour work schedule, so that's why it says 40 hours. But as a teacher, he may be required to be in office even outside the actual teaching, like workers in other professions. So whatever he plans to each privately would probably need to happen in his private time (outside 9-6 weekdays).
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Old 05-21-2017, 09:04 PM
 
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Correct. 40 hours of "Work" whether it be teaching in a class, or the school asks you to do other tasks, but if they state 40 hours a week, that means you need to be at school for those hours, which seems like a lot. Maybe they can change the contract terms to add teaching hours.
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Old 05-21-2017, 09:44 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,921 posts, read 70,745,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Yeah that's a great point Ruth. The thing is, you want to be able to have fewer teaching hours and more time to do tutoring privately. Teachers tutor kids for 30 to 50 USD per hour. That adds up to a lot of extra income each month. I would ask them to clarify the teaching hours. 40 hours is a lot.
Nobody but the elite could come up with that kind of money for tutoring.

And yeah; he's signing a contract, so he should have a clearer picture of what the job entails, before signing.
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Old 05-21-2017, 11:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Nobody but the elite could come up with that kind of money for tutoring.

And yeah; he's signing a contract, so he should have a clearer picture of what the job entails, before signing.
Chinese are willing to spend big bucks if it gives their children an edge in education. Being a foreigner in China grants a lot of good opportunities by itself.
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Old 05-22-2017, 12:12 PM
 
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I don't know why there are all these legends of high hourly rates teaching English. They pay the Filipinos 2 USD per hour to give Skype lessons. 20 USD per hour for a young white, NES is doable, but add in cancelled classes and commute times. Not the kind of people I want owing me money either. The big thing is that unless you can enter the country with a Z Visa, you may very well be working illegally for some very sleazey agent. About 1500 foreign teachers are deported from China every year. And notice on your contract...about the third item, will say they can change the terms at any time. Another reason they like the fresh graduates. Oh, and there will be a long list of ways they can dock your pay, but zero stipulations for them screwing up, big time. Look for a uni job with a light load. The students don't want to learn, but the funding had to be used, and they need a white face in the composite. Just don't have any great ideas or high expectations.
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Old 05-22-2017, 12:40 PM
 
4,665 posts, read 2,647,052 times
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Originally Posted by Hal Roach View Post
I don't know why there are all these legends of high hourly rates teaching English. They pay the Filipinos 2 USD per hour to give Skype lessons. 20 USD per hour for a young white, NES is doable, but add in cancelled classes and commute times. Not the kind of people I want owing me money either. The big thing is that unless you can enter the country with a Z Visa, you may very well be working illegally for some very sleazey agent. About 1500 foreign teachers are deported from China every year. And notice on your contract...about the third item, will say they can change the terms at any time. Another reason they like the fresh graduates. Oh, and there will be a long list of ways they can dock your pay, but zero stipulations for them screwing up, big time. Look for a uni job with a light load. The students don't want to learn, but the funding had to be used, and they need a white face in the composite. Just don't have any great ideas or high expectations.
I think all tutoring may technically be illegal since a work visa only allows one specific job, but it's common for foreigners to pick up side gigs to make extra income. I've seen small English tutoring schools and I'm not entirely sure how those work, but typical foreigners work in schools or universities.

I've never personally taken a tutoring job, but I've been offered $15-30 an hour personally and I've considered doing it before, but I'm not a teacher by trade and it's not something that really interests me. I also don't work when I am in China so I don't need to make a living. My job is still in the US. But we are considering moving to China full time at the end of this year.
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Old 05-22-2017, 12:58 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,921 posts, read 70,745,369 times
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Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
Chinese are willing to spend big bucks if it gives their children an edge in education. Being a foreigner in China grants a lot of good opportunities by itself.
Sure, those who have the money are willing to spend it, but a lot of people simply don't have that kind of money. $50/week = $200/month, minimum, assuming only 1 lesson/week. Or $120/month, if the charge is $30. Poor farmers, factory workers, marginalized Tibetans in Chengdu, for example, wouldn't have that kind of money. Maybe some successful shopkeepers could manage, but it's mostly successful big businessmen and government officials who would be in a position to pay those rates.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 05-22-2017 at 01:08 PM..
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Old 05-22-2017, 01:28 PM
 
4,665 posts, read 2,647,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Sure, those who have the money are willing to spend it, but a lot of people simply don't have that kind of money. $50/week = $200/month, minimum, assuming only 1 lesson/week. Or $120/month, if the charge is $30. Poor farmers, factory workers, marginalized Tibetans in Chengdu, for example, wouldn't have that kind of money. Maybe some successful shopkeepers could manage, but it's mostly successful big businessmen and government officials who would be in a position to pay those rates.
Well those people can't pay and won't. There are plenty of people in those big cities who can pay a lot for tutoring. In Chengdu there will be plenty of wealthy parents who want their child tutored by a white face.
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