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Old 07-15-2017, 01:57 PM
 
12,258 posts, read 18,393,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justanokie View Post
I think you misunderstand that in Singapore, especially the younger generation, English is their first language. I know many younger ones that speak a dressed up type of Singlish and their "native tongue" or "ancestral language" whatever you want to call it, is atrocious. Bad enough that elders complain about their lack of skill speaking it.

Many of the older generations, sure English is a 2nd, 3rd or even 4th language. Many of them speak 1 or 2 dialects of Chinese (usually hokkien, mandarin, teochew, or cantonese), Malay and/or Tamil.
There is no misunderstanding. What do you mean exactly? Nothing you wrote is unknown to me.
I do lots of business with and in Singapore, in fact I will be there in a couple weeks.
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Old 07-15-2017, 09:44 PM
 
Location: singapore
1,526 posts, read 1,270,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkwensky View Post
All of the Singaporeans I've met were of Chinese descent and they all spoke English with a Chinese like accent even if they do have a somewhat unique syntax and phrasing.
Do those Singaporeans of Malay or Indian descent speak with different accents or does everyone on the island sound East Asian?
I have attached here a youtube video of Malay Singaporean Najib Ali .. You can hear for yourself and let me know what you think about his accent


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTW_C33807M

For Singaporean Indian, here is popular entertainer Kumar...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dkzazt6B4Jw

let me know your take on typical Malay and Indian Singaporean accent

I personally think it is somewhat different from Singaporean Chinese accent

Last edited by singaporelady; 07-15-2017 at 10:26 PM..
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Old 07-15-2017, 09:50 PM
 
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Singaporelady, how does Singapore deal with the 4 languages it speaks? In school, home, and work? Do the Chinese, Indians, and Malays live mostly segregated, or they are mixed up in the same neighborhoods?
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Old 07-15-2017, 10:26 PM
 
Location: singapore
1,526 posts, read 1,270,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Singaporelady, how does Singapore deal with the 4 languages it speaks? In school, home, and work? Do the Chinese, Indians, and Malays live mostly segregated, or they are mixed up in the same neighborhoods?
For the older generation , chinese and Malay singaporeans communicate in Malay a lot. Many Indians here in their 30s-40s speak excellent Hokkien , but those below 30s not so much .

Most of us live in hdb flats , so you find Malays , Indians and Chinese living in the same block and being Neighbours .

In workplace , English in the working language . Period. But sometime we will Chat with colleagues using Chinese , Malay or dialect at times
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Old 07-16-2017, 05:29 AM
 
1,789 posts, read 1,447,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkwensky View Post
All of the Singaporeans I've met were of Chinese descent and they all spoke English with a Chinese like accent even if they do have a somewhat unique syntax and phrasing.
Do those Singaporeans of Malay or Indian descent speak with different accents or does everyone on the island sound East Asian?
Well if they were born and raised in Singapore they will sound remarkably similar imo. Singlish itself has a chinese sound because its a mixing of English and Chinese. It also borrows heavily from Malay, especially the syntax or structure of it.

I think with all the younger generations you would not be able to identify their ethnicity based on their Singlish.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
There is no misunderstanding. What do you mean exactly? Nothing you wrote is unknown to me.
This
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I remarked that sometimes it's hard to understand people from Singapore, but that's because for many English is a second language and it's heavily accented.
Most all the younger generation in Singapore now, English is a first language. They will still have an accent, no different than people from UK or Australia or Texas having different sounding accents. They don't teach Scouse in schools in Liverpool but if you grow up there you will not sound like someone from London.


Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Singaporelady, how does Singapore deal with the 4 languages it speaks? In school, home, and work? Do the Chinese, Indians, and Malays live mostly segregated, or they are mixed up in the same neighborhoods?
No they aren't segregated. The Singapore government has an intrusive desegregation policy to prevent it. 80 - 85% of housing is controlled by the government. They have quotas based on race. Your ethnicity is identified on your IC and birth certs. If you apply to buy a HDB flat (government owned apartment) you will not get approved if it would result in your ethnicity quota to be exceeded.

For good or bad, Singapore is one of the most diverse and at the same time inclusive societies you can see today. While people there still strongly identify with and practice their ethnic customs they at the same time are very knowledgeable and respectful of others customs.

The older generations in particular most likely speak 3 or 4 languages. You would be very mistaken to think that malay uncle driving your taxi doesn't understand your conversation in chinese with someone else. Likewise the chinese aunty behind the counter understanding malay.

An example, an older couple I know in Singapore. You would identify them as malay, since they mostly dress and follow malay customs. He speaks 4 different dialects of chinese (possibly more), english and malay all fluently. She speaks tamil, punjab, hindi, malay and a little bit of english. Their adult kids speak 1 or 2 chinese dialects, Malay and English. The grandkids who are mostly just turning adults speak fluent English, and passable Malay (but they struggle with it).

A good friend of mine who is of chinese decent is in a similar situation. Her parents speak several types of chinese, malay and english. She speaks 2 dialects of chinese and english.

I have been in large gatherings and I still get amazed when I look around a room full of people and you can pick out 3 or 4 different languages being spoken, and watch as they switch back and forth depending on who is included in the group. It might be 3 or 4 in one group speaking malay but when they add in someone else it might switch to english.
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Old 07-16-2017, 08:24 AM
 
12,258 posts, read 18,393,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justanokie View Post
Most all the younger generation in Singapore now, English is a first language. They will still have an accent, no different than people from UK or Australia or Texas having different sounding accents. They don't teach Scouse in schools in Liverpool but if you grow up there you will not sound like someone from London.
Since you are addressing that to me, it's still doesn't tell me anything I don't already know.
But thanks for your contribution to this topic.


Singaporelady - those two videos are distinctly Indian in accent. But India, like Singapore, has a British history and thus you can detect that crisp british-based language education in the cadence.
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Old 07-17-2017, 07:51 AM
 
908 posts, read 548,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
I have attached here a youtube video of Malay Singaporean Najib Ali .. You can hear for yourself and let me know what you think about his accent


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTW_C33807M

For Singaporean Indian, here is popular entertainer Kumar...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dkzazt6B4Jw

let me know your take on typical Malay and Indian Singaporean accent

I personally think it is somewhat different from Singaporean Chinese accent
The Malay guy sounds like an Indonesian guy I know and the Indian one sounds Indian. It didn't sound like either was doing too much Singlish though. Is it because they're both performing for a more diverse crowd and had to "codeswitch" from how they talk with friends?
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Old 07-18-2017, 01:36 AM
 
Location: Both coasts
1,582 posts, read 4,286,964 times
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Very distinct-sounding
I'm familiar with it, based on my background

You do not hear it often where I am, so my ears always perk up when I hear a Singapore/ Malaysian accent
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