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Old 08-04-2017, 12:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Some Chinese films are quite successful in the domestic market. For example 战狼2, released recently. It's actually quite hard to make commercial films nowadays, because seeing a film in the theater is very expensive and people usually choose Hollywood products.

No, those Japanese or Korean films are not influential among ordinary audience. Most Americans never watched any of them, for example. (I'm not saying they are not good.)
China has put out some really good war tv shows and movies. There's just too many of them that are not good and too often they have a political agenda, which is typically to show how evil Japan is. I understand they want to be historically accurate, but they are just causing hatred against modern Japan and stirring up the mob.

The number of Hollywood movies allowed in Chinese theatres is still limited, but they allow more in every year.
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Old 08-04-2017, 02:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
The number of Hollywood movies allowed in Chinese theatres is still limited, but they allow more in every year.
Now it is probably 30 per year?
Older people like my parents almost never go to the theater nowadays. Many young people may watch a few in a year
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Old 08-04-2017, 05:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Now it is probably 30 per year?
Older people like my parents almost never go to the theater nowadays. Many young people may watch a few in a year
Im not sure how many they let in anymore, a few years back it was only like a dozen Hollywood movies were allowed in Chinese theatres. I know they allow more now, but I don't know how many.

Here's an interesting article.
https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/03/holl...s-a-boost.html
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Old 08-05-2017, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Taipei
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
No, those Japanese or Korean films are not influential among ordinary audience. Most Americans never watched any of them, for example. (I'm not saying they are not good.)
No non-English cinema would ever be influential among ordinary audience, not even French or Italian cinemas, arguably the two most successful non-English cinematic powers, are mainstream in the Anglophone.

However, Japanese animated films are very successful in the West. A lot have seen Spirited Away, and Ghibli studio prodution is extremely well-known and recognised outside of Japan. China used to have some really good movies as well, like Farewell My Concubine, Raise the Red Lantern, To Live, Red Sorghum, The Story of Qui Ju etc. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is the biggest box office hit in a foreign language in American cinematic history, and it's Taiwanese/HK/Chinese production. The Last Emperor is about as Chinese as it could be (albeit in English), and it went on to win Best Picture at the 1988 Oscars. The cultural argument makes no sense because there are plenty of examples of Asian films doing extremely well in foreign markets, either artistically, commercially, or both.

P.S. BBC complied a list of 100 Greatest Films of the 21 century in 2016, and guess what, 4 out of the top 10 are Asian, from Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and Iran, respectively. Whining about Chinese or Asian culture not being appreciated in the West is persecution complex as it actually is, if the products are good enough. Great Wall and Tiny Times are not, unfortunately.
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Old 08-05-2017, 11:11 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
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^ Those you named are historic type movies. I can't think of Chinese modern life movies that went mainstream in the West.
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Old 08-05-2017, 11:25 AM
 
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The one Chinese film that I recall breaking the western market was Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. It seems as though western audiences are mostly receptive to the Chinese martial arts theme. Which is why Jackie Chan and Bruce Lee were able to become big names in western cinema.
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Old 08-05-2017, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Taipei
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
^ Those you named are historic type movies. I can't think of Chinese modern life movies that went mainstream in the West.
Because that's like the only thing China can sell.

Quote:
The one Chinese film that I recall breaking the western market was Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. It seems as though western audiences are mostly receptive to the Chinese martial arts theme.
Part of the reason to the success of CTHD in the West was due to the fact that it was a Hollywood co-production. That's also why it was able to garner 10 Oscar nominations (including a foreign language film win under Taiwan). If it was a 100% foreign production it wouldn't have gotten nearly the same level of buzz and attention.
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Old 08-05-2017, 01:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
No non-English cinema would ever be influential among ordinary audience, not even French or Italian cinemas, arguably the two most successful non-English cinematic powers, are mainstream in the Anglophone.

However, Japanese animated films are very successful in the West. A lot have seen Spirited Away, and Ghibli studio prodution is extremely well-known and recognised outside of Japan. China used to have some really good movies as well, like Farewell My Concubine, Raise the Red Lantern, To Live, Red Sorghum, The Story of Qui Ju etc. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is the biggest box office hit in a foreign language in American cinematic history, and it's Taiwanese/HK/Chinese production. The Last Emperor is about as Chinese as it could be (albeit in English), and it went on to win Best Picture at the 1988 Oscars. The cultural argument makes no sense because there are plenty of examples of Asian films doing extremely well in foreign markets, either artistically, commercially, or both.

P.S. BBC complied a list of 100 Greatest Films of the 21 century in 2016, and guess what, 4 out of the top 10 are Asian, from Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and Iran, respectively. Whining about Chinese or Asian culture not being appreciated in the West is persecution complex as it actually is, if the products are good enough. Great Wall and Tiny Times are not, unfortunately.
Nowadays Chinese film makers are less interested in "artistic" films than before.
In old days, they received government funding but now everything is commercialized. Also international awards mean less than before too.

Before the 2000s, many movies were made from government money and it cost only 1 yuan or 2 to buy a ticket. My parents used to watch movies almost every week, but in recent 10 years they probably only went to the theater twice.
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Old 08-05-2017, 05:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
^ Those you named are historic type movies. I can't think of Chinese modern life movies that went mainstream in the West.
Great Wall from 2016. It's mostly in English, but it is a Chinese movie. $332 million. I'd call that a blockbuster. I liked it and thought it deserved slightly better reviews. It only has a 35% rating on rotten tomatoes. I thought it'd be in the 50-60s range.
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Old 08-05-2017, 08:44 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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How come I can't find it on IMDB?
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