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Old 08-21-2017, 02:37 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
That's not unfortunate. Let's leave at least some parts of China undeveloped. No need to pave over the whole country.
When you do not even have access to clean water, decent hospitals and toilets, and kids have to walk miles to school, you wouldn't say that.
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Old 08-21-2017, 05:12 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
5,554 posts, read 2,894,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
When you do not even have access to clean water, decent hospitals and toilets, and kids have to walk miles to school, you wouldn't say that.
Not every inch of the planet should be developed and inhabited. I am certain that even within Yunnan, there are enough places with "clean water, decent hospitals and toilets, and kids (don't) have to walk miles to school" so it's not like there are no better options for those people.
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Old 08-21-2017, 08:43 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
Not every inch of the planet should be developed and inhabited. I am certain that even within Yunnan, there are enough places with "clean water, decent hospitals and toilets, and kids (don't) have to walk miles to school" so it's not like there are no better options for those people.
Funny, would you or anyone live in an uninhabited area in China? I of course was talking about places where people already live. The province will not be 100% developed because there are a lot of mountains.
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Old 09-06-2017, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Nashua
528 posts, read 1,088,374 times
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My spouse's family is from Xinjiang, Northwest of Urumqi. I have been there in January and February and can confirm what my relatives have told me - they get very little snow, but it stays the winter. I would say less than four inches the whole winter. They will have grey skies and little sun but none of my relatives have outside thermometers so I don't know the actual temps. They don't care. They just go out anyway. A lot of the time, men don't wear hats either. If they are working outdoors, they wear hats and padded trousers and coats. They just don't have snow plows. People brush the snow away with brooms.
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Old 09-06-2017, 11:57 PM
 
6,725 posts, read 6,601,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yinduffy View Post
My spouse's family is from Xinjiang, Northwest of Urumqi. I have been there in January and February and can confirm what my relatives have told me - they get very little snow, but it stays the winter. I would say less than four inches the whole winter. They will have grey skies and little sun but none of my relatives have outside thermometers so I don't know the actual temps. They don't care. They just go out anyway. A lot of the time, men don't wear hats either. If they are working outdoors, they wear hats and padded trousers and coats. They just don't have snow plows. People brush the snow away with brooms.
If you want to know the real-time temperature, just use a cell phone app or go online.

Generally speaking, Urumqi has day-time temperatures around -10 C in January.
China is influenced by Siberian High in winter, and it is usually very dry.
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Old 09-20-2017, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
282 posts, read 120,705 times
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Kunming has milder temperatures but higher humidity. Panzhihua has higher temperatures but lower humidity. Honestly, you won't feel the humidity as much due to milder temperatures. San Diego actually has similar humidity levels to Miami (69% average humidity vs 73%). The difference is that it is more arid and has milder temperatures.

Hell, even Los Angeles has humidity above 70%, at least at LAX. I couldn't find humidity levels for other parts of the city. LAX is about 10-20F cooler during the daytime in the summer than other parts of L.A., so I suppose it's possible that other parts have less humidity. But I think people tend to underestimate/overestimate humidity based on temperatures. Miami will feel "dry" in the winter, but the humidity level is essentially the same as in the summer. The difference is that the temperatures are milder and it rains considerably less.
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