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Old 10-26-2017, 04:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WannabeCPA View Post
There will be vastly different opinions on whether China is one of the greatest countries ever. First off you need to define "greatest". Secondly, how far back in time are we going back, since the current country was only founded in 1949. I've been to China several times, as that's where my wife is from. From what I see, they are still developing, not on par with the most advanced countries but developing rapidly. I enjoy visiting the historical sites since I like history in general. The people there in general are rude, obnoxious, selfish and treat each other like dirt. However, if you're a foreigner, specifically a white foreigner, they will treat you much better. I'm a foreigner myself, but since I'm also Asian I'm generally treated with either dislike or indifference with people in general refusing to help me with the language barrier. So basically I think there are a lot of historical sites and beautiful scenery to see, but the people make me have an overall negative impression of China as a country.
It's true that many Chinese seem impolite to strangers. However that is just something superficial. I feel friendship in China is more "real".
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Old 10-27-2017, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
It's true that many Chinese seem impolite to strangers. However that is just something superficial. I feel friendship in China is more "real".
No, not at all. It's just cultural familiarity. People in China think that foreigners are "superficial" and friendship between Chinese people is a stronger and deeper bond; people outside of China think the same thing when speaking about Chinese people.

I have heard from many Chinese people (I think you, among them) that Chinese people lend their friends money, and that this is proof of "true" friendship; in the West, most people would think of using money lending as a metric for true friendship to be crass and low-minded. Chinese people think that a reluctance to ask for money from friends, or to give a friend who asks money, to be crass and low-minded. Because I understand both cultures, I can see the background for both mindsets and don't think that one or the other is correct, but it highlights the massive discrepancy between the cultures.

Even though my life is now anchored in China, I have only maybe a half-dozen close Chinese friends; in the same time I've been here, I've made close bonds with dozens of Western expats. I'm going to go out on a limb and assume it's a similar situation with you, and many other Chinese expats living in Western countries. We always feel a warmth and familiarity to our own culture that transcends what may be provable metrics on how another society is "better."
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Old 10-27-2017, 01:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
No, not at all. It's just cultural familiarity. People in China think that foreigners are "superficial" and friendship between Chinese people is a stronger and deeper bond; people outside of China think the same thing when speaking about Chinese people.

I have heard from many Chinese people (I think you, among them) that Chinese people lend their friends money, and that this is proof of "true" friendship; in the West, most people would think of using money lending as a metric for true friendship to be crass and low-minded. Chinese people think that a reluctance to ask for money from friends, or to give a friend who asks money, to be crass and low-minded. Because I understand both cultures, I can see the background for both mindsets and don't think that one or the other is correct, but it highlights the massive discrepancy between the cultures.

Even though my life is now anchored in China, I have only maybe a half-dozen close Chinese friends; in the same time I've been here, I've made close bonds with dozens of Western expats. I'm going to go out on a limb and assume it's a similar situation with you, and many other Chinese expats living in Western countries. We always feel a warmth and familiarity to our own culture that transcends what may be provable metrics on how another society is "better."
Maybe. But I am not talking about expat communities, but local people.

When I work in America, even the American colleagues themselves do not get together often or know each other very well. Maybe you can say American people do not make friends in their work place that much. However it is much better in Europe, also in China. When I worked in Europe, some colleagues invited me to their home etc. Never happened in America, not even once. (But the American professors did invite graduate students.)

In spite of the cultural differences, money lending is a good metric. Except for charity, you won't lend money to strangers or people you don't like for free. That is universal. In fact I lent several hundred dollars to an American student in my lab when I was in graduate school. For a period of time he kept saying he was short of cash, so I lent him. He took it (and did not return, honestly).
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Old 10-27-2017, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
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Expat or not doesn't really matter. I have made dozens of work friends over the years, and just got back from visiting the US, where I saw many of them. It's just that for most people who emigrate, no matter how much you love your adopted home, you'll probably always socialize better with other natives of your culture.

The attitude that any culture lacks the ability to make deep friends is silly... People have deep bonds and socialize everywhere.
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Old 10-27-2017, 07:24 PM
 
6,726 posts, read 6,609,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Expat or not doesn't really matter. I have made dozens of work friends over the years, and just got back from visiting the US, where I saw many of them. It's just that for most people who emigrate, no matter how much you love your adopted home, you'll probably always socialize better with other natives of your culture.

The attitude that any culture lacks the ability to make deep friends is silly... People have deep bonds and socialize everywhere.
Of course things are relative and every individual is different. In any place there are loners and popular ones.

However, regional and cultural differences exist too. Many Chinese say people in Shanghai are difficult, for example.
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Old 10-27-2017, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
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One very sad thing that google has at least impressed upon me is that there aren't that many traditional Chinese temples (daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, etc.) left in china.

I hope someone with more knowledge on this can provide more information but it seems to me the main cities don't have that sort of traditional architecture that I'm hoping to see.
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Old 10-27-2017, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
One very sad thing that google has at least impressed upon me is that there aren't that many traditional Chinese temples (daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, etc.) left in china.

I hope someone with more knowledge on this can provide more information but it seems to me the main cities don't have that sort of traditional architecture that I'm hoping to see.
In the big cities, a lot of it has lost, either due to war, or in the years after... Temples and religious venues were often destroyed or repurposed for government use, where they were heavily altered and later torn down for new buildings. Even today, entire historical districts get torn down to make way for new developments.

Big cities do still have historical districts, like Haizhu Square/Xiamian Island here in GZ, but for the most part if you want to see old architecture you'll have to go out to rural areas that have experienced less development and economic improvement.
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Old 10-27-2017, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Taipei
6,776 posts, read 5,126,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
One very sad thing that google has at least impressed upon me is that there aren't that many traditional Chinese temples (daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, etc.) left in china.

I hope someone with more knowledge on this can provide more information but it seems to me the main cities don't have that sort of traditional architecture that I'm hoping to see.
Japan has nice temples. If youíre into those thatís the destination for you.
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Old 10-27-2017, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
9,628 posts, read 2,660,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
In the big cities, a lot of it has lost, either due to war, or in the years after... Temples and religious venues were often destroyed or repurposed for government use, where they were heavily altered and later torn down for new buildings. Even today, entire historical districts get torn down to make way for new developments.

Big cities do still have historical districts, like Haizhu Square/Xiamian Island here in GZ, but for the most part if you want to see old architecture you'll have to go out to rural areas that have experienced less development and economic improvement.
that's upsetting. I am still wondering (or holding out hope at least) that the Chinese are still building new structures modeled after classical dynastic china architecture or even rebuilding previously destroyed temples, buildings, etc. Their age doesn't matter to me that much, I care more for the feel and style.
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Old 10-27-2017, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Japan has nice temples. If youíre into those thatís the destination for you.
I like Japan, I've been there before, but personally Chinese architecture appeals to me more right now. The Japanese temples tend to be very simplistic and wooden while china's are more intrinsic with the background and have better mythological connections to me at least.
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