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Old 10-03-2017, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Asia
2,761 posts, read 1,100,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
When I was in my 20's, I never missed back home (U.S.) but as I get closer to 40, and my parents get older, I miss home much more. I could not wait to get back to Asia and my friends back then. Now I like spending time in the U.S. Things are simple in the U.S. and I like that.
Yes. I feel the same.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Being part of the community, meaning having a good local social circle, or even going down to the downtown restaurants/bars, being part of a church or town/city activities and clubs. Do you really have many local Asian friends? Are you close friends with local Chinese or Japanese or wherever you live? Your always an outsider if your white/black and live in Asia, even if you can speak the local language. I like the feeling of being a local, knowing people in my town, and making more friends. That's rather difficult to do with locals in Asia.
I've been in TW for more than 30 years. Now 55. Looking to retire back home in the US.

I could easily retire in Taiwan (my wife is Taiwanese). But, as much as I have loved living in Asia, I do miss home. I have been fortunate to be able to return home multiple times each year, and I do not expect any real problems re-acculturating to life in the US.

I have a large circle of local and expat friends, and I do speak, read, and write Mandarin. So, life is easy, and easier still as my wife is local.

My father passed two years ago back home. Again, I was fortunate to be able to visit him several times each year. But, my Mother is getting old and is not well.

My FIL passed earlier this year, and I do not want to leave here until my MIL goes, so that my wife can care for her until then.

So, I expect I will work another two years and then my wife and I will head to the US for retirement.

Much of Asia is indeed great for living, especially as a younger person. Not sure if it is suitable for someone who has not previously lived here to come for retirement.
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Old 10-03-2017, 03:33 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 8,062,897 times
Reputation: 3066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salmonburgher View Post
Much of Asia is indeed great for living, especially as a younger person. Not sure if it is suitable for someone who has not previously lived here to come for retirement.
I agree with that. It's far better to spend some serious time in advance to explore and get familiar with potential countries of interest in order to be better able to determine how much you really like that country. It's also a good idea to have a few friends that live in the country you're planning to retire in. It'd be a major drag to move to a country to settle down for retirement only to find yourself getting tired, bored, dissatisfied, disenchanted, or any number of other reasons with a particular country after a few months.
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Old 10-03-2017, 07:07 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
4,847 posts, read 3,374,646 times
Reputation: 7738
One of the biggest things that people seem to avoid in a discussion of Asian retirement is healthcare. Obviously Medicare doesn't provide coverage overseas. Oldsters tend to develop chronic health issues. Places like Singapore and Japan have world class medical services. In other places healthcare is sketchy.


I do know for instance that the Philippines has a national healthcare system called Phil Health that foreigners can purchase. I'm told it can cover about 60% of expenses. I'm not aware of the current premiums. The Phil Health facilities are not up to par with Western standards.
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:42 PM
 
652 posts, read 581,038 times
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Yeah, I really think Asia is a young man's game. Great when your young, to advance a career or make some bucks, but when you talk settling down I'd rather be in the U.S. The best years of my life was when I was working in Shanghai in my 20's and 30's but I'm older and my situation has changed. Plus I want to try and make up for lost time with my family on the East Coast in the States. Do the traditional family gatherings and holidays.
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Old 10-04-2017, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,943 posts, read 36,139,074 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
I agree with that. It's far better to spend some serious time in advance to explore and get familiar with potential countries of interest in order to be better able to determine how much you really like that country. It's also a good idea to have a few friends that live in the country you're planning to retire in. It'd be a major drag to move to a country to settle down for retirement only to find yourself getting tired, bored, dissatisfied, disenchanted, or any number of other reasons with a particular country after a few months.
Yep! As a person who has lived abroad for a long-time and traveled a lot. There are MANY times where I researched a country that I hadn't visited yet, thought it would be amazing to me, only to arrive and feel 'bleh'.

On the opposite side, I've traveled to places that I didn't think I'd be interested in at all, only to find myself really liking the place a lot.

In short, seeing people who've never been to Asia, deciding on the best one to 'go live out their golden years in' just seems like a bad idea. They often have no interest in the countries, know nothing about them, and just sort out issues such as 'healthcare', 'cost of living', 'access to visas'.

People really need to have some interest in the location they will be moving to. I just don't see how they'd adjust properly, and truly enjoy it, without some interest in what the said location offers.
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Old 10-04-2017, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,943 posts, read 36,139,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
One of the biggest things that people seem to avoid in a discussion of Asian retirement is healthcare. Obviously Medicare doesn't provide coverage overseas. Oldsters tend to develop chronic health issues. Places like Singapore and Japan have world class medical services. In other places healthcare is sketchy.


I do know for instance that the Philippines has a national healthcare system called Phil Health that foreigners can purchase. I'm told it can cover about 60% of expenses. I'm not aware of the current premiums. The Phil Health facilities are not up to par with Western standards.
Yeah, but, I think you are coming from someone as a person who probably already has high quality healhcare?

For Americans who can't afford U.S. healthcare at all, they really aren't going to get the highest tech stuff, by any stretch.

It's easier to pay someone 'at-cost' in say the Philippines or Thailand, than having some debilitating bill in the U.S., when you don't have any insurance at all....or you can't afford the minimums for the required basics.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:38 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,667,247 times
Reputation: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Yeah, I really think Asia is a young man's game. Great when your young, to advance a career or make some bucks, but when you talk settling down I'd rather be in the U.S. The best years of my life was when I was working in Shanghai in my 20's and 30's but I'm older and my situation has changed. Plus I want to try and make up for lost time with my family on the East Coast in the States. Do the traditional family gatherings and holidays.
I moved the other way, and Asia is not specifically for young people, but rather, people in their 20's or 30's find it easier to adapt, assimilate or adjust to a new environment. Classmates and coworkers often become good friends for life. Where do retirees find new friends anyway? It's also extremely difficult to start learning a new language when one is of retirement age. I grew up in Asia and for me, it's the US that's for young people.
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Old 10-04-2017, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,943 posts, read 36,139,074 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
I moved the other way, and Asia is not specifically for young people, but rather, people in their 20's or 30's find it easier to adapt, assimilate or adjust to a new environment. Classmates and coworkers often become good friends for life. Where do retirees find new friends anyway? It's also extremely difficult to start learning a new language when one is of retirement age. I grew up in Asia and for me, it's the US that's for young people.
I feel that way too. I'd hate to retire in the U.S. It would be too isolating for me. Imagine living in a car culture with overpriced healthcare, and nothing to do but watch TV all the time. Reliant on people to pick you up in their car, as you lost your driver's license, as many older people experience in the U.S.

For me, I'd rather live in extremely affordable Asia, have an apartment where I just shuffle my feet to an elevator. I want convenience stores (and pharmacies when older), that are all an elevator button push away.

Not only that, but for those of use who have spent tons of years in Asia, we've built an extremely extensive expat peer group of very interesting people that we really enjoy hanging out with, and sharing stories with.

I cannot imagine having to sit on some couch in some car-centric U.S. city or town, with a peer group I cannot relate to, nor would want to relate to (don't they predominately only talk about tv shows, sports, and *shudder* Fox News? (The latter two also being extremely tv-centric)

Nah, I'd rather be in Asia, continue with an active social life, have interesting conversations with a wide range of nationalities and expats, and be awed and amazed at being able to live an interesting life where tv shows are something you have very little time to devote your time to watching.
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Old 10-04-2017, 05:28 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,667,247 times
Reputation: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
One of the biggest things that people seem to avoid in a discussion of Asian retirement is healthcare. Obviously Medicare doesn't provide coverage overseas. Oldsters tend to develop chronic health issues. Places like Singapore and Japan have world class medical services. In other places healthcare is sketchy.


I do know for instance that the Philippines has a national healthcare system called Phil Health that foreigners can purchase. I'm told it can cover about 60% of expenses. I'm not aware of the current premiums. The Phil Health facilities are not up to par with Western standards.
It's difficult to discuss healthcare because each country is very different. Obviously, places like Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan have world class medical services, but they are also expensive (as almost everything else in these places). Taiwan is a good place where there's a better balance between costs and quality. Furthermore, even if they are in less developed countries, the top hospitals in the large metro areas of large metro areas of Bangkok, Metro Manila, Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur, can actually be world-class.

Philhealth is not a very good system but is extremely affordable for foreigners at around $300 to $350 per year. Locals pay less. Philhealth doesn't cover a lot of things, but as Tiger Beer mentioned earlier, medical care is affordable, so people can pay "at cost" without insurance, and people don't go bankrupt.

Each country in Asia has their own health care problems, but by comparison, perhaps no where else is the system more broken than the USA. Here's what happened to my friend, to illustrate how broken the system is. My friend gave birth, and had her parents fly in from Asia to see their new grandchild. They're just going to stay for 3 months, to help care for their new grandchild. As it's not required and it's for a short visit, they didn't get medical insurance and being non-residents in the US, they are not covered by anything. Within a few days of their arrival, her father experienced shortness of breath and tightness of chest, so they rushed him to the emergency room, thinking he might be having a stroke. After checkup and giving him an ECG, he got discharged. It was determined he was merely stressed, had jet lag and not sleeping well with the new baby, and that due to the time difference, he somehow lapsed in taking his antihypertension meds. Only thing he needed to do was to rest more, not sleep in the same room as the baby until both he and the baby adjust to the correct day/night hours, and a slight dosage increase of his antihypertension meds. The whole checkup process probably took less than 30 minutes, and the whole stay in the hospital was just about an hour. My friend was shocked when the hospital bill came to more than $4k! They negotiated and finally settled at around $1500. The hospital could bill her whatever they wanted just because her father was uninsured. It's ridiculous. In the Philippines, such incidents only costs around $50 to $150 without any insurance.
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Old 10-04-2017, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,771 posts, read 5,114,752 times
Reputation: 4555
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
I moved the other way, and Asia is not specifically for young people, but rather, people in their 20's or 30's find it easier to adapt, assimilate or adjust to a new environment. Classmates and coworkers often become good friends for life. Where do retirees find new friends anyway? It's also extremely difficult to start learning a new language when one is of retirement age. I grew up in Asia and for me, it's the US that's for young people.
Ehhh no. It’s really just moving is for young people and staying put is for old people. It’s not so much about the places as the mentality and attitude.
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