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Old 10-04-2017, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,951 posts, read 36,201,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Yeah, I really think Asia is a young man's game.
This is probably true universally in the career realms....but there is definitely a large place in Asia for older western men. They are littered throughout almost all of Pacific Asia, old retired men, sometimes starting second families, or just reliving their youth with serial dating. Some of them enjoying the freedom to do something as simple as drink alcohol at a beach (things that are completely unacceptable in the United States).

Equally, the U.S. is not good to older people. There isn't much respect, time, or interest in older people in the U.S. No one is interested in their stories, their opinions, their lives. They are more easier targets for crimes against them in the United States. Just look at U.S. TV alone, pretty much everything is geared towards young people, from MTV, blockbuster movies, the tv shows, etc. It's a novelty to see a show that isn't geared towards youth, and the few that do, i.e. Golden Girls...are something weird as well..i.e. old people who might appeal towards young people because they act young....etc. Stuff like that.

I much prefer the value systems of Asia, and their deep respect for older people, and their love for family, parents, etc. It's nice to see.

Quite a shock when I go back to the States, and that feels quite absent to me.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Asia
2,761 posts, read 1,104,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I feel that way too. I'd hate to retire in the U.S. It would be too isolating for me. Imagine living in a car culture with overpriced healthcare, and nothing to do but watch TV all the time. Reliant on people to pick you up in their car, as you lost your driver's license, as many older people experience in the U.S.
Certainly we all have different wants and desires. I suppose the location, too, will determine whether there is "nothing to do" or lots to do.

I have many friends and a large family back where I look to retire, and there are many things to do. Theater, sports, concerts, bars, markets, restaurants, community events, and travel all over the US and Canada and the islands and Mexico and Europe. And I am happy to sit and drink and just pass the time with old friends and family, even if it is at home with a game on the television.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
For me, I'd rather live in extremely affordable Asia, have an apartment where I just shuffle my feet to an elevator. I want convenience stores (and pharmacies when older), that are all an elevator button push away.
That's definitely a plus for Asia. But, you seem like someone who has already lived in Asia and are already comfortable here. This thread, however, unless I'm mistaken, is discussing where in Asia a Western person might retire.

I have seen countless young Western people come and go from Asia, usually because they could not handle the cultural and linguistic differences. This has been true even often for Western people who married local partners.

I think it would be extremely difficult for a retired Western person who has never lived in Asia to pick up and transfer to an Asian country as a retiree, and I'm not even referring to the legalities of visas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Not only that, but for those of use who have spent tons of years in Asia, we've built an extremely extensive expat peer group of very interesting people that we really enjoy hanging out with, and sharing stories with.
Mmmmm... Again, one of the worst things about being a long-term expat is watching friends leave, one after the other.

Also, many expats have ... difficulties ... not sure how to phrase this, so I'll just say it ... a large minority of American expats (and I suspect the numbers of expats from other nations is similar) suffer from depression, are bi-polar, or have other problems.

Even for those of us who do not suffer with such problems, living in Asia has a sort of maturity-retardation effect, especially on men. That's great if you're one of us. But, that could be off-putting for an elderly retiree newly arrived in Asia. Or, are we just talking about single retiree men expats? That makes a difference!

Not sure the bar scene is going to be particularly appealing to a retiree expat on his/her first time in Asia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I cannot imagine having to sit on some couch in some car-centric U.S. city or town, with a peer group I cannot relate to, nor would want to relate to (don't they predominately only talk about tv shows, sports, and *shudder* Fox News? (The latter two also being extremely tv-centric)
We're all different.

I have no problem relating to/with my childhood friends and family back home, even though I have been in Asia for more than 30 years. Of course, I plan to return to my hometown, which is very close to the city. I don't plan to sit around watching television (other than football games), and most of the people I know back home are not glued to their televisions. I guess it depends on where you are and who you know?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Nah, I'd rather be in Asia, continue with an active social life, have interesting conversations with a wide range of nationalities and expats, and be awed and amazed at being able to live an interesting life where tv shows are something you have very little time to devote your time to watching.
Expats... which country?

Many expats, IMO, have created a false persona of who they were back home. I had never met so many experts and tough guys until I came over here and started meeting expats! Half the people (expats) I know were previously gang bikers, elite university graduates, fabulously wealthy, Interpol, etc...

But, yeah, they can be interesting!
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,951 posts, read 36,201,625 times
Reputation: 9489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salmonburgher View Post
Certainly we all have different wants and desires. I suppose the location, too, will determine whether there is "nothing to do" or lots to do.

I have many friends and a large family back where I look to retire, and there are many things to do. Theater, sports, concerts, bars, markets, restaurants, community events, and travel all over the US and Canada and the islands and Mexico and Europe. And I am happy to sit and drink and just pass the time with old friends and family, even if it is at home with a game on the television.

That's definitely a plus for Asia. But, you seem like someone who has already lived in Asia and are already comfortable here. This thread, however, unless I'm mistaken, is discussing where in Asia a Western person might retire.

I have seen countless young Western people come and go from Asia, usually because they could not handle the cultural and linguistic differences. This has been true even often for Western people who married local partners.

I think it would be extremely difficult for a retired Western person who has never lived in Asia to pick up and transfer to an Asian country as a retiree, and I'm not even referring to the legalities of visas.

Mmmmm... Again, one of the worst things about being a long-term expat is watching friends leave, one after the other.

Also, many expats have ... difficulties ... not sure how to phrase this, so I'll just say it ... a large minority of American expats (and I suspect the numbers of expats from other nations is similar) suffer from depression, are bi-polar, or have other problems.

Even for those of us who do not suffer with such problems, living in Asia has a sort of maturity-retardation effect, especially on men. That's great if you're one of us. But, that could be off-putting for an elderly retiree newly arrived in Asia. Or, are we just talking about single retiree men expats? That makes a difference!

Not sure the bar scene is going to be particularly appealing to a retiree expat on his/her first time in Asia.

We're all different.

I have no problem relating to/with my childhood friends and family back home, even though I have been in Asia for more than 30 years. Of course, I plan to return to my hometown, which is very close to the city. I don't plan to sit around watching television (other than football games), and most of the people I know back home are not glued to their televisions. I guess it depends on where you are and who you know?

Expats... which country?

Many expats, IMO, have created a false persona of who they were back home. I had never met so many experts and tough guys until I came over here and started meeting expats! Half the people (expats) I know were previously gang bikers, elite university graduates, fabulously wealthy, Interpol, etc...

But, yeah, they can be interesting!
I just looked up your profile, and you are from Pittsburgh. One of my all-time favorite u.s. cities BY FAR! If I were to go back to the U.S., that one be one of my top cities - i.e. tons of cool neighborhoods, safer than most u.s. cities, a city that more people stay in the city, lots of walkable neighborhoods as those hills created more density and proximity to walk to restaurants, combined with the safer than most cities.

Pittsburgh is one of the very few areas in the U.S., that I'd love to live to, if I were to go back. It's also affordable.
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Old 10-04-2017, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Asia
2,761 posts, read 1,104,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I just looked up your profile, and you are from Pittsburgh. One of my all-time favorite u.s. cities BY FAR! If I were to go back to the U.S., that one be one of my top cities - i.e. tons of cool neighborhoods, safer than most u.s. cities, a city that more people stay in the city, lots of walkable neighborhoods as those hills created more density and proximity to walk to restaurants, combined with the safer than most cities.

Pittsburgh is one of the very few areas in the U.S., that I'd love to live to, if I were to go back. It's also affordable.
Go Steelers!

Yes. That certainly all factors in to my decision to return there. Its also the reason for my name... I know expats from all over the world and none of them want to return to their homes. But, Pittsburghers are like salmon. We're all trying to get back there!

Full disclosure, I have other family and health reasons for wanting to go back there. Of course that makes a difference, for me, as Pittsburgh has excellent medical care.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
597 posts, read 354,023 times
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What would be the main reason people would want to retire to Asia?
It seems to me that if it is financial, that can be risky. Asia is the region of the world becoming increasingly wealthy and it may not be cheap for westerners for very long.
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Old 10-04-2017, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Asia
2,761 posts, read 1,104,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
What would be the main reason people would want to retire to Asia?
It seems to me that if it is financial, that can be risky. Asia is the region of the world becoming increasingly wealthy and it may not be cheap for westerners for very long.
Asia is a big place. There are places where real estate is ridiculously expensive and others where it is unbelievably inexpensive.

Daily cost of living, other than the above-said real estate, can be very inexpensive in many parts of Asia.

Medical care can also be very inexpensive in Asia, if you can qualify for it.

So, financial concerns are certainly appropriate as a consideration. But, I think the simple fact of enormously different cultures and languages is still a more significant consideration for a newly-retired, somewhat elderly, never-lived-in-Asia retiree expat-to-be.
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Old 10-05-2017, 07:37 AM
 
661 posts, read 587,136 times
Reputation: 728
I think Salmonburgher makes a good point about friends and your community in Asia. The problem is they're always leaving. I had a great group of friends during my Shanghai days 10 or so years ago. Out of the 8 or so guys only one is still left in China. Most have moved back to the States with a couple moving to Hong Kong or Taiwan. This is one of my original points about being part of a community or a group of friends to hang out with. I don't know any expats who have a number of local Asian friends, as most are friends with other English speaking expats. Having friends continue to revoke in and out of my life, esp as I get older, bothers me.

And the argument of Asia being more convenient for older people compared to the U.S. I don't agree with. Lots of developing countries in Asia you have long lines at the hospital, sitting waiting to see a doctor. Or having to take a taxi or city bus to see a doctor in Asia instead of sitting in your car and going to a doctor's office in the U.S. I just dont see the conveniences in Asia as we age.
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Old 10-05-2017, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,897 posts, read 5,284,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
This is an attribute that seems to only be pinpointed with Japan.

This is a universal commonality throughout Asia. You'll never be a Filipino or Indonesian or Thai or Chinese or Korean or anything else either.
That is true, esp in Korea. But the flavor is different in SE Asia. If you are with well educated people in SE Asia, educated Westerners are welcomed and seen as worthy to join the social circle. Not the case in Korea and Japan.
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Old 10-08-2017, 11:18 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,319 posts, read 6,985,853 times
Reputation: 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Many of you have lived in Asia as an expats for many years, some of you are Asian but have migrated to North America or Europe or Australian/NZ for school or work reasons. Do you think retiring in Asia is a good idea? Could you handle it? How about an early retirement and being in your 40's or early 50's and living in Asia without a job. Would you get bored? Do you have concerns about healthcare? If you had kids, do you hear they would be too "localized" and your foreign culture or language hasn't influenced them enough?


Do you feel like your missing out on a different or better more purposeful life back home? Can you realistically see yourself growing old and dying in Asia? China? Taiwan? HK? Vietnam? Korea?
Does this have to be decided on? Can you take it year by year? Just based on your posts over the years I feel like you have a good support network, good financial resources, and you're not too old...is it possible to set yourself up for early retirement wherever you feel like at the moment, without being stuck there forever? I get that at some point it may be necessary to decide, but for now you can enter the pre-retirement phase and see how it's going, and make adjustments or changes when needed.

Anyway, that said, if you are just seeking other opinions, I'll say that I think I could "retire" in a handful of Asian countries. But it is hard know for sure and my thought of retirement is as a mobile, energetic, nomad in my early 50s. If I'm considering my true final phase in life, I really can't begin to picture what that would look like, much less where it would be.

BTW I am an early 30s American-born Chinese who has never lived in Asia but visited enough times to have spent around 1.5 years in Asia and have fairly close friends and relatives living in many parts of the region.
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Old 10-09-2017, 07:30 AM
 
661 posts, read 587,136 times
Reputation: 728
ProjectMaximus, I think your right, and its very difficult to foresee where you will be in your final years. Its just a topic that I find interesting as you read so many articles on retiring overseas, esp to places in Europe or South America, but not much on Asia as a whole. Yes, Thailand and the Phillippines, but none of the other larger countries. Plus, I just wanted to get ideas and thoughts from some on this site that I know are long time Asia expats, who originally were from North America or a Western country.


I guess I would now focus on "pre-retirement" and possibly working part time, or taking up hobbies or things I want to do. I've also thought of the idea of 6 months in Asia and 6 months in another country, which I find ideal, but I have a daughter and her school gets in the way of that.


Just thought it was an interesting topic. I'm the type of person who's always thinking and planning for the future. I've been thinking of where to move to and settle down over the last 8 years thinking I'll leave China soon, but it never happens...haha.
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