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View Poll Results: Which cuisine do you prefer?
Thai Cuisine 23 71.88%
Filipino Cuisine 9 28.13%
Voters: 32. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-02-2017, 06:34 PM
 
621 posts, read 382,346 times
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So many ignorant posters here who obviously have not tasted all the foods in the world yet. Stereotypes again and again only actually shows people ignorance who has not tasted Filipino dishes. For those who tasted them wouldn't say they are not good only the ignoramus. Peasant food or food prepared for royalties, the only difference is the looks and preparation but the taste would vary. Many peasant foods can be tastier than food eaten by royalties. Who are royalties in here? Most are peasants anyway.
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Old 12-03-2017, 10:31 AM
 
5,721 posts, read 4,623,783 times
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I really like curry I had some Pumpkin Curry not too long ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by neMarL View Post
So many ignorant posters here who obviously have not tasted all the foods in the world yet. Stereotypes again and again only actually shows people ignorance who has not tasted Filipino dishes. For those who tasted them wouldn't say they are not good only the ignoramus. Peasant food or food prepared for royalties, the only difference is the looks and preparation but the taste would vary. Many peasant foods can be tastier than food eaten by royalties. Who are royalties in here? Most are peasants anyway.
Hey if you're cookin it, I'll try it.
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Old 12-03-2017, 10:48 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,141 posts, read 23,648,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
Most Filipino chefs don't cook their native cuisine. Don't be surprised to encounter a Filipino chef in a non-Filipino restaurant. Also, Filipinos prefer to taste other cuisines when eating out (it's long been a Fusion cuisine since some flavors accompany them on the way home).

Philippine chefs look to take national cuisine mainstream - BBC News





Fil-Am here. Thai is just spicy with heat (e.g. picante). But it lacks the complexity of spiciness of Indian food. Also the herbs (and the lack of grease being a contributing factor) makes Thai food taste plain.



Thailand is a very insular country. They do not use ingredients, methods, etc. that cannot be found outside of SE Asia.

You also forgot that Filipino cuisine makes use of sweet. Also, the counterpunch of two contrasting flavors is very famous feature of Filipino cuisine.
I don't think anyone necessarily has to be of ___ descent to be a great chef in cooking ___ cuisine.

A comparison to Indian cuisine is a difficult one, because while Thai cuisine does have a lot of regional differences, those pale in comparison to the regional differences found within India in pretty much every metric possible. I will say that as a loose general comparison, Thai cuisine does utilize a large variety of fresh herbs and spices far more commonly than pretty much any Indian regional cuisine and more than most in the world. There are a lot of commonalities that Thai cuisine shares with its neighboring cuisines, but that large use of fresh herbs and spices does set it apart from several. Also in comparison to Indian cuisine, Thai food generally has more dishes using vegetables either lightly cooked or raw whereas Indian cuisine is much more prone to stewing things down. As for comparisons to southeast Asia, I'd say that you can see the massive variety and quantity of fresh herbs and spices being apparent when you walk into wet markets in different countries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by neMarL View Post
So many ignorant posters here who obviously have not tasted all the foods in the world yet. Stereotypes again and again only actually shows people ignorance who has not tasted Filipino dishes. For those who tasted them wouldn't say they are not good only the ignoramus. Peasant food or food prepared for royalties, the only difference is the looks and preparation but the taste would vary. Many peasant foods can be tastier than food eaten by royalties. Who are royalties in here? Most are peasants anyway.
I don't think anyone in the world has tasted all the foods in the world. That's probably not possible.
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Old 12-07-2017, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,991,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
A comparison to Indian cuisine is a difficult one, because while Thai cuisine does have a lot of regional differences, those pale in comparison to the regional differences found within India in pretty much every metric possible. I will say that as a loose general comparison, Thai cuisine does utilize a large variety of fresh herbs and spices far more commonly than pretty much any Indian regional cuisine and more than most in the world. There are a lot of commonalities that Thai cuisine shares with its neighboring cuisines, but that large use of fresh herbs and spices does set it apart from several. Also in comparison to Indian cuisine, Thai food generally has more dishes using vegetables either lightly cooked or raw whereas Indian cuisine is much more prone to stewing things down. As for comparisons to southeast Asia, I'd say that you can see the massive variety and quantity of fresh herbs and spices being apparent when you walk into wet markets in different countries.
Thailand is technically a Buddhist country. But we saw in the late king's cremation some Hindu rites in the mostly Buddhist funeral. That contact between India cumulated in the various colored curries in Thai cuisine. The Thais did not have the expertise in spices of the Indian subcontinent, which could account for some of the comparative plainness in the Thai version.

A few more things:

Filipinos call their noodle dishes "Pancit". The closest variety strikingly similar to Pad Thai is called "Palabok". Notably peanuts are missing in the Palabok but feature a thick rice noodles, brown (shrimp-based) sauce, shrimp, hard-boiled egg, and green onion, similar to the Thai version. The crunchiness is provided by chicharrůn (pork rinds) instead.

Baking is not very common in East Asia. Luckily Filipinos have an extensive baking tradition. Pan de Sal is the staple of a Filipino breakfast (along with a cup of coffee and Tapsilog of one's choice). I personally love Macapuno Ensaymada (a young coconut brioche topped with Edam cheese) with coffee.

And I'd rather have Halo-Halo as a desert/snack to cool myself off on a hot day! There is controversy on whether to mix the ingredients the traditional (but messy) way or to eat it like a parfait.
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Old 12-07-2017, 08:03 AM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,165,342 times
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Yes on the whole Filipino food is really quite salty and variations on a theme. In terms of a world class cuisine it doesn't compare to Thai - although on the whole Filipino food is a better comfort food. Filipino cuisine does have one world class dish though - Sinigang. With the right amount of sourness and tamarind flavor - it is an excellent dish.


As has also been said Filipino sweet baking tends to be better also than the competition. Although, in general, Asian desserts are quite lame.
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Old 12-07-2017, 08:37 AM
 
2,736 posts, read 3,268,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Thai cuisine is one right up there as one of the top cuisines in the world. Mostly because the cuisine was developed to suit the taste of a King...and than everyone in the Kingdom wanted that same style.

Filipino food...on the other hand...is more practical, plain. It's just a functional food.

Let's put it this way...you don't see many Thai people or Thai communities outside of Thailand, but you'll see tons of Thai restaurants - with tons of non-Thai people eating in their restaurants. You will see large Filipino communities pretty much everywhere throughout Asia and immigration-oriented countries (USA, Canada, Australia, etc.)...but few Filipino restaurants, and the few Filipino restaurants you see, you'll rarely see a non-Filipino in them.

It's not that the food in the Philippines is bad...it isn't bad. It's just plain, functional, not that interesting. But if you do want to try Filipino food...the one that pretty much every Filipino and non-Filipino loves, is Adobo.

But, as far as cuisines go, Thailand is well-known as one of the better cuisines in the world.
Great points! As you stated, there are many Thai restaurants with non-Thai customers as compared to fewer Filipino restaurants with mostly Filipino customers.

Thai cuisine is indeed a top notch cuisine. Nevertheless, although not Filipino myself, I have a personal predilection for Filipino flavours such as pinacbit, kare-kare with plenty of bagoong, lugao, pancit palabok, etc.
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Old 12-07-2017, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,920,328 times
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I'd not only argue that Thai food is better, I'd argue that Filipino food is probably the worst in Southeast Asia. Though I've only had Laotian food a couple times, so perhaps I don't have enough of a sample size to judge.

I might be biased though, since I'm a vegetarian, and Filipino cuisine is arguably more meat heavy than any Asian cuisine save for Mongolia.
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Old 12-08-2017, 10:51 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,141 posts, read 23,648,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'd not only argue that Thai food is better, I'd argue that Filipino food is probably the worst in Southeast Asia. Though I've only had Laotian food a couple times, so perhaps I don't have enough of a sample size to judge.

I might be biased though, since I'm a vegetarian, and Filipino cuisine is arguably more meat heavy than any Asian cuisine save for Mongolia.
Well, thereís East Timor. Iím going to guess the variety isnít fantastic there.

Iíll say that while I prefer most other southeast asian cuisines to filipino cuisine, itís still got a pretty good selection of dishes I really like.
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