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Old 02-03-2018, 03:09 PM
 
196 posts, read 134,404 times
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This is just out of curiosity.

I often wonder why the Taiwanese Mandarin entertainment did not develop as quickly as like Hong Kong entertainment.

Did it have to do with the fact that Hong Kong Entertainment was able to sell records/tapes/CDs/videos/Films to over seas Chinese communities as they were overwhelmingly Cantonese at the time and were able to make more money to develop further?

Did Taiwanese government policies also maybe play a role as well?

Never mind mainland China, as all variety entertainment was destroyed by Mao Ze Dong and he closed off China from the rest of the world and did not allow pop culture to be part of China. Shanghai was China's Hollywood during Republic of China rule, but all of it was gone under People's Republic of China and the Shanghainese entertainers left to British Colony Hong Kong learning Cantonese and developing the Hong Kong entertainment very quickly and becoming popular. Maybe that may play a role as well?

When Deng Xiao Peng decidedly opened it's doors to interact with the whole world again financially and socially, pop culture entertainment started evolving again in China, but was not caught up like Hong Kong because Hong Kong's entertainment was already very developed and Mainland China had to start all over again.

Just curious about Taiwan's entertainment development.
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Old 02-03-2018, 03:19 PM
 
6,726 posts, read 6,611,101 times
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Your info is very outdated.
Hong Kong pop culture is not influential any more. Nobody in China watches Hong Kong TVs now, except for some Cantonese speakers.
There was a golden time for Taiwanese entertainment industry from 1980s to early 2000s too.
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Old 02-03-2018, 04:16 PM
 
196 posts, read 134,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Your info is very outdated.
Hong Kong pop culture is not influential any more. Nobody in China watches Hong Kong TVs now, except for some Cantonese speakers.
There was a golden time for Taiwanese entertainment industry from 1980s to early 2000s too.
Yes, I am aware that Hong Kong's entertainment influence is not where it used to be in Mainland China.
However, it is still influential in Guangdong province and in overseas Chinese communities with large Cantonese speaking populations.

Apparently, you did not read my statement on Mainland China's entertainment.

Did you not see I was speaking in past tense?

I used the words, "Was", "Were", "Started", and "Had".

Examples below.......
---------------------------------------------------------
When Deng Xiao Peng decidedly opened it's doors to interact with the whole world again financially and socially, pop culture entertainment started evolving again in China, but was not caught up like Hong Kong because Hong Kong's entertainment was already very developed and Mainland China had to start all over again.

Did it have to do with the fact that Hong Kong Entertainment was able to sell records/tapes/CDs/videos/Films to over seas Chinese communities as they were overwhelmingly Cantonese at the time and were able to make more money to develop further?
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Anyway, my main question is about why Taiwanese entertainment took time to catch up to Hong Kong's entertainment status. Because back then in the 1970s until 1990s there were quite good numbers of Taiwanese Mandarin singers that came to Hong Kong to learn Cantonese and sing Cantonese songs to further their fame. Examples, like Teresa Teng, Sylvia Chang, Sally Yeh, Nicky Wu(even his band mate Alec Su for a brief time) and etc. Teresa was the first Mandarin singer to become very famous in Hong Kong and having very big Cantonese hit songs unlike previous Mandarin singers in Hong Kong.

Sally Yeh came to Hong Kong because she had almost no fame in Taiwan and there were no results and came to Hong Kong to gain the fame she wanted, which she did because it was the main Chinese entertainment development during the 1980s and she had to learn how to speak and sing Cantonese as she originally exclusively spoke fluent English growing up in Canada and basic spoken Mandarin in her Taiwanese family household.

As a matter of fact, Sally Yeh and Teresa Teng were the one of the very earliest Mandarin speakers that were in the Cantonese Hong Kong entertainment industry of the 1980s.

Last edited by toby2016; 02-03-2018 at 04:27 PM..
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Old 02-03-2018, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,521 posts, read 3,105,957 times
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Chinese cinema is dead. the golden age of HK action movies died around 1995. Once donnie yen retires, its basically over. Chinese cinema is very sino-centric like wolf warrior 2. Its not really appealing outside of china. The 3 kingdom movies were not even that interesting.
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Old 02-03-2018, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
9,635 posts, read 2,663,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangerous-Boy View Post
Chinese cinema is dead. the golden age of HK action movies died around 1995. Once donnie yen retires, its basically over. Chinese cinema is very sino-centric like wolf warrior 2. Its not really appealing outside of china. The 3 kingdom movies were not even that interesting.
I wonder if they (mainland China) have the intellectual and emotional intelligence to make something as magnificent as Kung Fu Panda?
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Old 02-04-2018, 01:42 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,776 posts, read 5,128,008 times
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Eh who the **** cares. Taiwanese show business is vomit-inducing. Always has been and always will be. The tv shows, movies, music are all nothing but garbage. Ew.

Just watch the American stuff.
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Old 02-04-2018, 06:18 PM
 
6,726 posts, read 6,611,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
I wonder if they (mainland China) have the intellectual and emotional intelligence to make something as magnificent as Kung Fu Panda?
Are you serious?
Many domestic movies have much better reviews and profits than Kung Fu Panda, although it is a decent cartoon film.

China does not care about international market much, and most movies are designed for domestic audience only.
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Old 02-04-2018, 08:04 PM
 
501 posts, read 462,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Are you serious?
Many domestic movies have much better reviews and profits than Kung Fu Panda, although it is a decent cartoon film.
By "many" you mean 1? Kung Full Panda earned over US$500 million in profit. Only one Chinese movie, Wolf Warrior 2 has ever surpassed that. The Mermaid, arguably a Hong Kong movie, earned about the same profit.
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Old 02-04-2018, 09:01 PM
 
9,628 posts, read 5,951,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toby2016 View Post

Just curious about Taiwan's entertainment development.

My Taiwanese gf said that for a long time, the Taiwanese movie industry was only interested in making pro-military and pro-national films. It was all part of the government's propaganda machine to get young men fired up for joining the military and fighting China (even though service enlistment is mandatory).

The story usually follows a few young men going through basic training, being young and rowdy, broke some rules, learned their lessons, have their reckoning, and in the end become national heros and proved their superiors wrong.

So their movies had virtually no appeal outside of Taiwan. The funny thing is, they hired HK actors and directors for some of the movies.

.
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Old 02-04-2018, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
9,876 posts, read 6,624,363 times
Reputation: 6279
Quote:
Originally Posted by beb0p View Post
My Taiwanese gf said that for a long time, the Taiwanese movie industry was only interested in making pro-military and pro-national films. It was all part of the government's propaganda machine to get young men fired up for joining the military and fighting China (even though service enlistment is mandatory).

The story usually follows a few young men going through basic training, being young and rowdy, broke some rules, learned their lessons, have their reckoning, and in the end become national heros and proved their superiors wrong.

So their movies had virtually no appeal outside of Taiwan. The funny thing is, they hired HK actors and directors for some of the movies.

.
That's actually the CMPC (Central Motion Picture Corporation) line or influence, I think they were owned by the Kuomingtang (Nationalist Party). To their credit, after martial law, they did bankroll or support other local auteurs like Edward Yang, Hou Hsiao-hsien, and Tsai Ming-liang who were part of the New Wave (see below). I think they closed down sometime in 2006.

I definitely remember some of these army basic training movies that were a light-hearted look at the life of a conscript (Taiwan has universal compulsory military training). Such as the "Yes Sir" movie series (called Bao gao ban zhang). One of them starred Nicky Wu and Takeshi Kaneshiro (or Jing Cheng-wu in Mandarin), a Taiwan-born Japanese singer and film star.

The other types of movies that Taiwan has traditionally put out were adaptations of Chuing Yao novels - melodramatic love stories.

That said, in the late 1980s and 90's, there were what we call the New Wave of Taiwanese cinema, directors like Edward Yang and Hou Hsiao-Hsien - who made rather artsy films which may have wow'ed the Cannes people, but at home, probably didn't have a very wide appeal.
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