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Old 08-30-2018, 07:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
I read that the word ketchup came to English from Malay, but that Malay likely got it from Cantonese (k'ē chap 'tomato juice'). I know a bit of Mandarin, but no Cantonese -- so, I cannot verify. I do know that kecap manis ('sweet ketchup') is a very popular addition to Indonesian food dishes. It's brown and tastes good poured over noodles and fried cabbage and tofu.

Tomato juice is 茄汁 (qie2 zhi1 in Mandarin Pinyin, ke4 zap1 in Cantonese Jyutping), so Cantonese pronunciation is close enough to Malay kecap or English ketchup.
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Old 08-30-2018, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Earth
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i've been using hello chinese app on the iphone
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Old 08-30-2018, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
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Then there is "gweiloh" (or gweilo) literary meaning "ghoulish bloke" which isn't a true English word but is used quite often when describing Westerners in Hong Kong (yes some of the same people who are part of the original topic for this post). I've even seen publications further Anglicize the term by pluralizing it as "gweilos". Had it been in Mandarin pronunciation, it would have been something like gui lao but to my knowledge Northern Chinese never referred to Westerners as ghost people. In the past, this term would have been viewed as derogatory but lately I think it has become more acceptable in a mildly teasing manner.
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Old 08-30-2018, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Tulsa
1,807 posts, read 811,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
Yes for the reasons already stated in this thread:
  • that Hong Kong is not a typical immigrant destination and has no good plans to integrate immigrants into mainstream society (a byproduct of the old British colonial days when foreigners were either well to do businessmen or their foreign ethnic servants, usually from South Asia, both of whom pretty much kept to themselves)
Except for it does have plans to attract immigrants.

https://www.immd.gov.hk/eng/useful_i...epreneurs.html

https://www.immd.gov.hk/eng/services...on_scheme.html
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Old 08-31-2018, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
I have seen Aomen before on maps. It is not unheard of. I have never seen "Ohmuhn" however. "Macau" is either a Portuguese corruption of Ma Zu, the goddess of fishermen whom the Cantonese often refer to as Tin Hou, or a Portuguese corruption of Ma Ge, the name of her temple in Macau.
A-Ma Temple - MACAO WORLD HERITAGE

"A-Ma Temple already existed before the city of Macao came into being. The name “Macao” is believed to derive from the Chinese “A-Ma-Gau” meaning “Bay of A-Ma”, on which A-Ma Temple is located."
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Old 08-31-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
Then there is "gweiloh" (or gweilo) literary meaning "ghoulish bloke" which isn't a true English word but is used quite often when describing Westerners in Hong Kong (yes some of the same people who are part of the original topic for this post). I've even seen publications further Anglicize the term by pluralizing it as "gweilos". Had it been in Mandarin pronunciation, it would have been something like gui lao but to my knowledge Northern Chinese never referred to Westerners as ghost people. In the past, this term would have been viewed as derogatory but lately I think it has become more acceptable in a mildly teasing manner.
Correct. It's now a more casual term that's lost its original derogatory meaning. In Singapore the equivalent is "ang moh" (red-hair).

The more common, casual term for Westerners in Mainland China is "laowai" (translated as 'old foreigner').
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Old 08-31-2018, 03:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
Correct. It's now a more casual term that's lost its original derogatory meaning. In Singapore the equivalent is "ang moh" (red-hair).

The more common, casual term for Westerners in Mainland China is "laowai" (translated as 'old foreigner').
"lao" does not mean "old" here. It is just a prefix for a lot of nouns, such as laoban (boss), laoshi (teacher), laoxiang (fellowman) etc.
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Old 08-31-2018, 04:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
I read that the word ketchup came to English from Malay, but that Malay likely got it from Cantonese (k'ē chap 'tomato juice'). I know a bit of Mandarin, but no Cantonese -- so, I cannot verify. I do know that kecap manis ('sweet ketchup') is a very popular addition to Indonesian food dishes. It's brown and tastes good poured over noodles and fried cabbage and tofu.

Ketchup = 茄醬.

Tomato juice (like V8) = 茄汁.

However, Ketchup pronounced similar to 茄汁 in Cantonese, so people (socially and informally) also referred Ketchup as 茄汁.
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Old 09-01-2018, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
"lao" does not mean "old" here. It is just a prefix for a lot of nouns, such as laoban (boss), laoshi (teacher), laoxiang (fellowman) etc.
Well, that's the literal translation, I'm explaining for the benefits of non-Chinese speakers. I would think in this case "lao" denotes informality or casualness, as opposed to a formal prefix like for boss, teacher.
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Old 09-01-2018, 01:18 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,672,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
Well, that's the literal translation, I'm explaining for the benefits of non-Chinese speakers. I would think in this case "lao" denotes informality or casualness, as opposed to a formal prefix like for boss, teacher.

And am still wondering why mouse/rat (laoshu) and tiger (laohu) are prefixed with "lao" too
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