U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-21-2018, 12:35 PM
 
4,665 posts, read 2,637,440 times
Reputation: 3342

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
It's not that bad. My parents always talk about such things at home in China, not just between themselves, but also in family/friends gatherings.

China government does not care what ordinary people say in private. But if you make it public that is another story.
I agree, among good friends and family such discussions are fine, but still be reserved. Donít tell your Chinese friends that Hong Kong or Taiwan should be self ruled, that wonít help your friendship.

In public I would discourage such discussions, no benefit can come from it. Chinese people are very friendly and reserved, but you never want to be in a position where itís them (Chinese) vs you (a foreigner). Chinese mobs have a horrible reputation. Itís an unusual mindset, but itís there and itís their country. If you canít respect Chinese culture and beliefs, China isnít the place to be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-21-2018, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,513 posts, read 3,094,486 times
Reputation: 3355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
I agree, among good friends and family such discussions are fine, but still be reserved. Don’t tell your Chinese friends that Hong Kong or Taiwan should be self ruled, that won’t help your friendship.

In public I would discourage such discussions, no benefit can come from it. Chinese people are very friendly and reserved, but you never want to be in a position where it’s them (Chinese) vs you (a foreigner). Chinese mobs have a horrible reputation. It’s an unusual mindset, but it’s there and it’s their country. If you can’t respect Chinese culture and beliefs, China isn’t the place to be.

this is why I want china divided into 3 kingdoms and tibet to become a buffer state. There is way too many of them. Trump is giving all world war 2 gains to them. unfortunately, the country is still authoritarian.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2018, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,351,665 times
Reputation: 11309
Open political or even social discussion is a bad idea for a weiguoren in China, even if you are in agreement with the person you are talking to. It holds true for any society that it's generally more palatable to hear your own countrymen complain about your home than an outsider, but China takes it to a whole 'nother level. It's not only the legendary Chinese mob mentality you have to deal with, but also the government agencies tasked with maintaining public order and harmony. One thing that is important to remember when you are here is that you are, and will always be, a foreigner. You are held to much different standards than locals, sometimes to your benefit and other times to your detriment.

Life here is generally alright, all this said, and yes, China *does* need to attract and retain foreign talent, if it wants to fulfill it's dreams of dominating the 21st century.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2018, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,856 posts, read 3,417,733 times
Reputation: 1801
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
One thing that is important to remember when you are here is that you are, and will always be, a foreigner. You are held to much different standards than locals, sometimes to your benefit and other times to your detriment.
It is hard enough for a Western foreigner to be accepted into Chinese society but a Chinese American esp. an American born Chinese (ABC) but also Chinese born Chinese (CBCs) who lived much of their lives in America may find it even harder to be accepted. Locals are more apt to scorn Chinese Americans, thinking they are indifferent to traditional Chinese culture, that they have been brainwashed by the "gweilos" into thinking they are one of them, or that it is even shameful for them to speak more fluent English than Chinese. As we all know, all of this can very well be untrue but that is the challenge foreigners of Chinese descent can face in China. You are absolutely right in the mob mentality of China, which had nurtured over hundreds of years. If you are Chinese, you will always be Chinese, you must think and act like a proper Chinese, you must not disagree with Chinese customs, and you will be held to Chinese standards for better or worse.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2018, 08:34 PM
 
24,199 posts, read 17,584,759 times
Reputation: 9149
Quote:
Originally Posted by runandstuff View Post
I am looking to teach English in China as a way to immerse myself in a new culture, learn Mandarin, and grow skills and employability. My long-term career goals do not include teaching English. Ideally I would like an international career working with diverse groups of people on issues involving sustainable food production and the like. I was wondering if as a foreigner it would be possible for me to volunteer in projects or groups involving urban community gardening, or indoor agriculture? I am interested in less polluted cities like Kunming, Xiamen, and Fuzhou (would also really appreciate suggestions for cities and explanations why)

I am really excited by China's is rapid growth and innovation as it increasingly employs green technologies and infrastructures, and would like to progress from teaching English to a job working in this area.

Possible? Not possible? Advice?
Actually speak to Chinese people on this. It maybe a good idea to visit China first. I thought about teaching English in China, but after speaking to Chinese about extremely polluted cities and contamination and reading up on it, I did not want to go. Certain websites are also BLOCKED in China. Ditto for a lot of social media.

Honestly I think the average American would not fall in love with the life and the lack of freedom in terms of things that are prohibited. I think you might be better off in a more Westernized place like Japan. I also think from speaking to other people who have done it takes a special breed of American to really be able to deal and adapt to Asia long term. Keep in mind you won't have a path towards citizenship. I think Europe is better for Americans than Asia. More similar, greater freedoms, and a path towards citizenship if you live there long term.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2018, 08:36 PM
 
24,199 posts, read 17,584,759 times
Reputation: 9149
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Open political or even social discussion is a bad idea for a weiguoren in China, even if you are in agreement with the person you are talking to. It holds true for any society that it's generally more palatable to hear your own countrymen complain about your home than an outsider, but China takes it to a whole 'nother level. It's not only the legendary Chinese mob mentality you have to deal with, but also the government agencies tasked with maintaining public order and harmony. One thing that is important to remember when you are here is that you are, and will always be, a foreigner. You are held to much different standards than locals, sometimes to your benefit and other times to your detriment.

Life here is generally alright, all this said, and yes, China *does* need to attract and retain foreign talent, if it wants to fulfill it's dreams of dominating the 21st century.
It will not happen in large numbers. Easier for foreign talent to go to Europe, where they can get citizenship. Where they don't have to deal with extreme pollution. Where they are not under an authoritarian government. China itself does not have much experience in dealing with foreigners or outside cultures, and this is an issue across Asia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2018, 02:18 AM
 
6,725 posts, read 6,601,290 times
Reputation: 2386
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
It will not happen in large numbers. Easier for foreign talent to go to Europe, where they can get citizenship. Where they don't have to deal with extreme pollution. Where they are not under an authoritarian government. China itself does not have much experience in dealing with foreigners or outside cultures, and this is an issue across Asia.
"Foreign" is not just western or white.
In fact many Koreans and Japanese live in China, for example. When I was a college student in Beijing, it was said 200,000 south Koreans lived in that city. I don't know the situation now.

China is too populated and forces their citizens to have up to two children. It'll be extremely unfair to Chinese families if they allow many foreigners to obtain citizenship.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2018, 02:30 AM
 
614 posts, read 305,444 times
Reputation: 956
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
It'll be extremely unfair to Chinese families if they allow many foreigners to obtain citizenship.
How so?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2018, 02:46 AM
 
6,725 posts, read 6,601,290 times
Reputation: 2386
Quote:
Originally Posted by HumbleMerchant View Post
How so?
Chinese people who have "too many children" will automatically lose government job, communist party membership (if any), and pay a fine.
In Chinese culture, people want a son or a couple of children. China government makes them sacrifice.
Now you import people from other countries....Of course extremely unfair.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2018, 02:52 AM
 
614 posts, read 305,444 times
Reputation: 956
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Chinese people who have "too many children" will automatically lose government job, communist party membership (if any), and pay a fine.
In Chinese culture, people want a son or a couple of children. China government makes them sacrifice.
Now you import people from other countries....Of course extremely unfair.
Chinese people who have too many children usually live in the countryside, where nobody really keeps track of the number of children you have.

You want a son if you live in the countryside, yes. If you live in a city, a son will be more costly to you because of Chinese culture (needing to have an own apartment for marriage etc.).

But still, how would it be unfair to Chinese if foreigners would have a path to citizenship? They would be under the same conditions as Chinese, no? And it's not like China has a viable welfare system in place so how exactly would it be unfair?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top