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View Poll Results: Which is HK more of?
More "Chinese" 26 89.66%
More "British" 3 10.34%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-10-2018, 07:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samuelnini View Post
if you say some systems,the political system, the police systems are learned from britain .but if you are saying about lifestyle,hongkonger just way more traditional than mainlander .because not sufferd the cr, their festival customs are preserved very well .if you go to kowloon, you will find a stunning scene full of traditional chinese medicine shops, traditional markets...

I found that some people say Beijing is very "Chinese" ----this is a joke .maybe some ancient buildings are .but beijingers are the most non-traditional people .
MOST local beijingers are from other parts based on national department and universities during communism time.and then during 2000s 8 million people move from other cities in every province in china .
no one really celebrate any festival !! except central part, no local old shops ,people only go to the mall because lack of street shops,everybrands are just same as any mall in US.

even Shanghai people know more about tradition ..they celebrate the qinging festival in a grand way.
True. But Beijing keeps its dialect. Every person born in Beijing has a strong Beijing accent, although some slang words faded away.
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:13 PM
 
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Just an interesting sidebar, I was watching a HK movie today, and they showed one guy on the High Court as a white guy. I did a little research and discovered via Wikipedia there are still a small handful of white justices in HK.

That made me curious, are there any other white or any other non Chinese ethnicity government officials in HK (or mainland China, I know there are representatives for some minority groups in the mainland)?

I know in mainland China there is a white official in the administration in Beijing, but I forget his position and name.
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,366 posts, read 1,660,383 times
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It can be really hard to find someone who speaks English. Even before 1999. I thought HK was just about as Chinese as Taipei.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
most people have English first names,
I don't think that's true. They have Chinese first names, but when they Study English, they adopt an English fist name, for use in English conversation, and introduce themselves as such when they meet an English speaker. Just as I adopted a Spanish first name when studying Spanish.

Last edited by cebuan; 12-10-2018 at 08:30 PM..
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Crappyville,PA
371 posts, read 284,092 times
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I didn't see to much of anything British during my short time there.
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Old 12-10-2018, 09:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
It can be really hard to find someone who speaks English. Even before 1999. I thought HK was just about as Chinese as Taipei.



I don't think that's true. They have Chinese first names, but when they Study English, they adopt an English fist name, for use in English conversation, and introduce themselves as such when they meet an English speaker. Just as I adopted a Spanish first name when studying Spanish.
Most Asian Christian's adopt Christian names as their names they use on a day tor day basis and many have done this for 100+ years. I dated a HK girl for about 6 years and her entire family (and friends) used (mostly) English names on a day to day basis. I have a Spanish name and a Chinese name, and it's not really the same comparison as someone studying.

Just because someone has the name Peter, doesn't necessarily mean they speak English. But I can almost guarantee they have some western or British influences, which is true for many people in HK.

My Spanish name is Mateo which has obvious origins, but my Chinese name is completely different. Besides for some official purposes, I seldom use my Chinese name to be honest.
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Old 12-11-2018, 02:09 AM
 
6,724 posts, read 6,599,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
Most Asian Christian's adopt Christian names as their names they use on a day tor day basis and many have done this for 100+ years. I dated a HK girl for about 6 years and her entire family (and friends) used (mostly) English names on a day to day basis. I have a Spanish name and a Chinese name, and it's not really the same comparison as someone studying.

Just because someone has the name Peter, doesn't necessarily mean they speak English. But I can almost guarantee they have some western or British influences, which is true for many people in HK.

My Spanish name is Mateo which has obvious origins, but my Chinese name is completely different. Besides for some official purposes, I seldom use my Chinese name to be honest.
Some foreign companies in China require employees to use (fake) English names to address each other. There are two major reasons: 1. so foreign employees can remember their names, and 2. People do not need to worry about titles, ages etc. You are just called "Peter" even if you are 30 older and are my boss. We cannot do that in Chinese, usually. It's very offensive to call such a person directly by name.
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Old 12-11-2018, 02:53 AM
 
Location: Tulsa
1,800 posts, read 804,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
It can be really hard to find someone who speaks English. Even before 1999. I thought HK was just about as Chinese as Taipei.



I don't think that's true. They have Chinese first names, but when they Study English, they adopt an English fist name, for use in English conversation, and introduce themselves as such when they meet an English speaker. Just as I adopted a Spanish first name when studying Spanish.
I can't speak for post-1997 HK.

But a lot of people from HK have official English names, I mean, those shown on their passport.

Linguistically, it's kind of funny that few people speak decent English or Mandarin in Hong Kong. But in Singapore, they not only speak better English but also better Mandarin.
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Old 12-11-2018, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
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In olden times, Chinese and especially all Chinese males are given a zi or courtesy name in addition to their ming zi or birth name. For example, Dr. Sun Yat Sen, the founder of the Chinese Republic, has the birth name Wen but also the courtesy name Yi Xian (Yat San in Cantonese pronunciation). This courtesy name is usually given when a boy (and sometimes girl depending on local/regional tradition - not all villages gave girls courtesy names) comes of age or gets married and is supposed to use this name in everyday use for the rest of his life. The birth name is reserved for parents, older relatives, and for official use only. It was considered disrespectful to address anyone by their birth name once they are of age and received the courtesy name.

Anyways, this tradition has fallen into disuse, at least in the large cities and this is why the younger generation in Hong Kong prefer to give themselves English courtesy names. However the rule remains and it is considered proper decorum to call people by their courtesy name. When I studied abroad in Hong Kong, I only addressed my roommate and any other local HK student by their English names and never by their birth names. Only in formal writing would I make any mention of their birth names.
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Old 12-12-2018, 02:24 AM
 
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For a place that has been a British colony for more than a century, Hong Kong is very, very Chinese. Aside from some government and legal systems that are still retained from the British times, there's hardly anything British left in Hong Kong. CULTURALLY, there's almost nothing left!


I visit Hong Kong almost every year. And aside from retaining Christmas, Good Friday and Easter Monday as holidays, most people in Hong Kong don't even observe any of the holiday traditions. Easter is definitely just another non-working day for most people. I spent Christmas Eve last year in Hong Kong, and I don't even remember anyone greeting Merry Christmas to each other. I haven't observed anyone going back home to give and open gifts, there are hardly any Christmas decorations in private apartments that I see. It's just like Japan, there are some Christmas decorations in public and commercial areas, but it looks like very few actually celebrate it with their families. Aside from hotels with more foreign guests, typical restaurants don't even have any Christmas specials. Contrast that when I visit up to a month before Mid-Autumn Festival, moon cakes are absolutely everywhere! And I hate it that a lot of restaurants will ask me to buy moon cakes many many weeks before the actual day. And if one goes to Hong Kong before Chinese New Year, celebratory signs are everywhere! Can see them months before the actual day. Stores that are selling nothing but red envelopes suddenly sprout up. Really very very Chinese.


Having an English name is not even that "British". I know many mainland Chinese and Taiwanese who study English or interact primarily with Americans, Canadians and Australians who adopt an English name, whether officially or not. I also know a Taiwanese whose English name is written in the "Also Known As" name on her Taiwanese/Republic of China passport. It also seems that the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand got more Hong Kong immigrants than the UK prior to 1997, so there are actually four other English-speaking countries which Hong Kong people might have closer ties.
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Old 12-13-2018, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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I spent four days recently in HK and didn't see anything whatsoever that reminded me of British culture.
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