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Old 06-04-2012, 07:08 AM
 
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I'd have to say New York City (Manhattan) with Hong Kong. Both are limited in size and are COMPLETELY filled up with skyscrapers. Both are the main Financial Hub for their respective continents.

The reason I would say HK over Tokyo, is that Tokyo definitely has scope to develop and the outer-suburbs are actually house-like with only a single storey and not high-rises. While it is quite rare to find a single family dwelling house in Manhattan (except for those townhomes) and HK (except for those random villages that are on the border with China).

Climate wise, obviously HK has a warmer winter and summer, however they both have hot and wet summers and drier winters.

Another reason for HK, is that it has a strong Western influence (Occupied by Great Britain) with English as an official language.

Therefore I'd say, HK and NYC would be the best pair.
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Old 06-21-2012, 06:23 PM
 
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Singapore=Irvine, Johor Bahru=Santa Ana.

Irvine is a suburb of Los Angeles; it has only 220K but it is everything that Singapore is--affluent, safe, culturally diverse (with a lot of Asians, esp. Chinese, Koreans, and Indians) efficient, and clean, with a world-class educational system, superb urban planning, a thriving financial hub, and a balmy climate. Irvine even has problems with Autumn wildfires and ant infestations like Singapore. It is a city renowned for being ghetto-free; similarly, Singapore was declared by UN the only major city in the world without a slum. Like Singapore, this high quality of life is regionally unparalleled, earning Irvine the nickname "The Bubble." However, like Singapore, it is BORING.

You can see the cultural diversity of Irvine this way: There are the successful Chinese and Caucasians (just like Singapore), there is an also-successful minority of Koreans and Indians (comparable to Indians in Singapore,), and there is the not-as-prosperous minority of Hispanics (like Malays.)

Santa Ana is next to Irvine. It is an impoverished, run-down city that is predominantly Hispanic, and has a very high crime rate. On a Singaporean website, on a list of "60 signs that you have been in Singapore too long," one of the signs is that "When you cross the border into Malaysia, you automatically and deeply fear for your life and your wallet. Especially your wallet!!" The citizens of Irvine (shall we call them Irvinites?) share the same phobia upon entering Santa Ana.

Santa Ana is also very industrial, like Johor Bahru, and much more congested and poorly planned than Irvine. Irvine has a high-tech traffic mitigation system that minimizes congestion, and Singapore has ERP to do the same job.

Finally, Santa Ana's dominance by Hispanics is very much like Johor Bahru's dominance by Malays: as mentioned before, both are not-as-prosperous minorities in Irvine and Singapore respectively but the majority in Santa Ana and Johor Bahru respectively.
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Old 06-21-2012, 06:55 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huamii View Post
I'd have to say New York City (Manhattan) with Hong Kong. Both are limited in size and are COMPLETELY filled up with skyscrapers. Both are the main Financial Hub for their respective continents.

The reason I would say HK over Tokyo, is that Tokyo definitely has scope to develop and the outer-suburbs are actually house-like with only a single storey and not high-rises. While it is quite rare to find a single family dwelling house in Manhattan (except for those townhomes) and HK (except for those random villages that are on the border with China).

Climate wise, obviously HK has a warmer winter and summer, however they both have hot and wet summers and drier winters.

Another reason for HK, is that it has a strong Western influence (Occupied by Great Britain) with English as an official language.

Therefore I'd say, HK and NYC would be the best pair.
Well the outer suburbs of Tokyo should be compared to the other boroughs. Many of the burbs of the Greater NYC are your typical single detached house, large parts of Statten and Queens.
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Old 06-21-2012, 06:57 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
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Originally Posted by Haowen Wong View Post
Singapore=Irvine, Johor Bahru=Santa Ana.

Irvine is a suburb of Los Angeles; it has only 220K but it is everything that Singapore is--affluent, safe, culturally diverse (with a lot of Asians, esp. Chinese, Koreans, and Indians) efficient, and clean, with a world-class educational system, superb urban planning, a thriving financial hub, and a balmy climate. Irvine even has problems with Autumn wildfires and ant infestations like Singapore. It is a city renowned for being ghetto-free; similarly, Singapore was declared by UN the only major city in the world without a slum. Like Singapore, this high quality of life is regionally unparalleled, earning Irvine the nickname "The Bubble." However, like Singapore, it is BORING.

You can see the cultural diversity of Irvine this way: There are the successful Chinese and Caucasians (just like Singapore), there is an also-successful minority of Koreans and Indians (comparable to Indians in Singapore,), and there is the not-as-prosperous minority of Hispanics (like Malays.)

Santa Ana is next to Irvine. It is an impoverished, run-down city that is predominantly Hispanic, and has a very high crime rate. On a Singaporean website, on a list of "60 signs that you have been in Singapore too long," one of the signs is that "When you cross the border into Malaysia, you automatically and deeply fear for your life and your wallet. Especially your wallet!!" The citizens of Irvine (shall we call them Irvinites?) share the same phobia upon entering Santa Ana.

Santa Ana is also very industrial, like Johor Bahru, and much more congested and poorly planned than Irvine. Irvine has a high-tech traffic mitigation system that minimizes congestion, and Singapore has ERP to do the same job.

Finally, Santa Ana's dominance by Hispanics is very much like Johor Bahru's dominance by Malays: as mentioned before, both are not-as-prosperous minorities in Irvine and Singapore respectively but the majority in Santa Ana and Johor Bahru respectively.
Interesting comparison, would never have thought to compare Singapore with anywhere in South California. I think on the surface the differences are obvious: Singapore is all high-density flats, Orange County is single storied sprawl, Singapore is very green, Orange County is pretty arid...but the comparison of Singapore/JB with Irvine/SA is interesting. I don't think America has a significant Singaporean/Malaysian component, I believe Orange County is more dominated by Koreans, Chinese, Vietnamese, Filipinos.etc.
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Old 06-21-2012, 11:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Interesting comparison, would never have thought to compare Singapore with anywhere in South California. I think on the surface the differences are obvious: Singapore is all high-density flats, Orange County is single storied sprawl, Singapore is very green, Orange County is pretty arid...but the comparison of Singapore/JB with Irvine/SA is interesting. I don't think America has a significant Singaporean/Malaysian component, I believe Orange County is more dominated by Koreans, Chinese, Vietnamese, Filipinos.etc.
Well, Singaporeans are mostly Chinese. Chinese are the largest Asian (and therefore non-white) group in Irvine in the 2010 Census. Also, I was trying to say that Mexicans are poorer like the Malays and the play the role in Irvine/Santa Ana that Malays play in Singapore/JB.

One more thing: Even though OC is arid, Irvine has wonderful, lush landscaping and abundant open space, that makes it easily earn the moniker "Garden City," which Singapore has earned for the same reason. Furthermore, bougainvillea is very popular in Irvine, and the plant originated in Malaysia/Singapore.

Quality of life, societal structure, and aesthetics, not density, is the basis of my comparisons.
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Old 06-21-2012, 11:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Well the outer suburbs of Tokyo should be compared to the other boroughs. Many of the burbs of the Greater NYC are your typical single detached house, large parts of Statten and Queens.
In that case, Hong Kong should be even more crowded than either NYC or Tokyo because how many people nowadays live in random villages in the New Territories?

While even the "suburbs" look like this:




At its built up, it will have a population density comparable to Manhattan.
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Old 06-22-2012, 01:26 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haowen Wong View Post
Well, Singaporeans are mostly Chinese. Chinese are the largest Asian (and therefore non-white) group in Irvine in the 2010 Census. Also, I was trying to say that Mexicans are poorer like the Malays and the play the role in Irvine/Santa Ana that Malays play in Singapore/JB.

One more thing: Even though OC is arid, Irvine has wonderful, lush landscaping and abundant open space, that makes it easily earn the moniker "Garden City," which Singapore has earned for the same reason. Furthermore, bougainvillea is very popular in Irvine, and the plant originated in Malaysia/Singapore.

Quality of life, societal structure, and aesthetics, not density, is the basis of my comparisons.
But I think that group refers to people from either the PRC, Taiwan and Hong Kong, not sure whether it would refer to Singaporeans or if any self-identify as 'Chinese.' Yes, 'Chinese' is an ethnic group or, as they call it 'race' in Singapore, but Singaporeans are first and foremost Singaporeans.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:44 PM
 
Location: The North
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Sorry they are not American cities, but Singapore to me was an almost perfect match for Vancouver, except with the heat turned on and the mountains put away. And Manila was very reminiscent of Mexico City in look and feel.
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Old 06-23-2012, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Originally Posted by Haowen Wong View Post
Furthermore, bougainvillea is very popular in Irvine, and the plant originated in Malaysia/Singapore.
Bougainvillea originated in South America, though it being such a popular ornamental plant for its vibrant flowering, is planted in many countries all over the world in tropical and sub-tropical climates (I know many people I've talked to who are familiar with it from seeing it in countries outside the United States in gardens as a decorative woody vine, even if they don't know it by name).

Most varieties grown for decorations actually originated though as hybrids of the various (South American) species and there are quite a lot of varieties developed/cultivated by people.
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Old 06-26-2012, 12:31 PM
 
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NYC and Shanghai - Both of them are the international financial centers of their respective countries with large communities of foreigners living in them.
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