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View Poll Results: Which country do you like better?
Japan 116 62.37%
South Korea 70 37.63%
Voters: 186. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-20-2009, 01:09 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
10,869 posts, read 10,559,706 times
Reputation: 9527

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Quote:
Originally Posted by City of Rain View Post
i mean, in a few years my english will be pretty much flawless.. especially if i spend more time in the US or UK (and my dads planning to move to the US, so yeah..) i dont think its fair that they prefer some nationalities over others..
Don't feel bad, I'd love to get a work visa for Norway. It's next to impossible for me even though I'm close to 'half' Norwegian (heritage). In fact, most countries don't want US citizens as residents (other than maybe rich retirees). It's a political thing, mostly. The work visas that Tiger Beer is referring to (teaching English) is one of the few avenues for Americans (unless you have a PhD in a high-demand field or something).

Native English speakers are still in demand in some countries. As English becomes more and more a world language and less and less a UK/US/Australia/NZ language, I think the demand for English teachers from a native country will become non-existent. Then no one will want a Yankee outside of the US.

Really, though, as a Norwegian citizen, you should have an easier time getting a foreign work visa than Americans (maybe not teaching English, but just in general).
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Old 07-20-2009, 01:14 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
10,869 posts, read 10,559,706 times
Reputation: 9527
Oh, I forgot about the vote!

I would have to say, geographically, I liked Japan better. Especially Northern Japan where it's colder. But, I definitely liked the Korean food better.

Actually I enjoyed both counties... maybe Japan just a bit more.
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Old 07-22-2009, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Bergen, Norway
221 posts, read 465,850 times
Reputation: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
Don't feel bad, I'd love to get a work visa for Norway. It's next to impossible for me even though I'm close to 'half' Norwegian (heritage). In fact, most countries don't want US citizens as residents (other than maybe rich retirees). It's a political thing, mostly. The work visas that Tiger Beer is referring to (teaching English) is one of the few avenues for Americans (unless you have a PhD in a high-demand field or something).

Native English speakers are still in demand in some countries. As English becomes more and more a world language and less and less a UK/US/Australia/NZ language, I think the demand for English teachers from a native country will become non-existent. Then no one will want a Yankee outside of the US.

Really, though, as a Norwegian citizen, you should have an easier time getting a foreign work visa than Americans (maybe not teaching English, but just in general).
really? why do you think itd be easier for me to get a foreing work visa than americans? is it like that with all countries in the EU?
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Old 07-22-2009, 02:13 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 6,109,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Teaching English...it is high in demand in both countries, but particularly South Korea. Look at www.eslcafe.com, and you'll see tons of job postings.
Did you have to learn a lot of Japanese/Korean before you could get the job?
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Old 07-22-2009, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,943 posts, read 36,139,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dport7674 View Post
Did you have to learn a lot of Japanese/Korean before you could get the job?
In Korea, you don't need any Korean. They would be shocked if you even knew basic Korean.

In Japan, they occasionally want that, depending.

For the most part, you aren't suppose to speak the native language in an ESL classroom, but they might want you know some Japanese so you can communicate with administration, etc. But NOT to use in the classroom.
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Old 07-23-2009, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Paramus, NJ
500 posts, read 1,255,084 times
Reputation: 207
^ You know, I never quite understood that rule. Ok, half-understood because it's "English class", but, wouldn't it be good to communicate to students in Japanese just to make it easier?

(And on topic with this thread, I've never been S. Korea so I can't really vote. But, since there's plenty of Koreans around my area, I can easily get a taste of it whenever I want. I think there's also a resurgance of Japanese coming back in, but the Korean population is wow....)
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Old 07-23-2009, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,943 posts, read 36,139,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unknown Memory View Post
^ You know, I never quite understood that rule. Ok, half-understood because it's "English class", but, wouldn't it be good to communicate to students in Japanese just to make it easier?
It depends on what you're teaching. If you have a teacher-centric classroom, where students are suppose to sit and listen to the teacher, then I suppose you'd have to translate your 'lectures' on grammar or whatever.

But ideally, you're suppose to have a 'student-oriented' classroom...where the students are using the language and practicing, etc. So teacher talking time should be limited, only to set up and guide the practice, etc.

Plus, students should get familiar with English, so when the teacher says 'open up the book', 'sit down' or whatever else, students DO get familiar with this.

I think they only real essential time when it would be good to use the other language in the classroom is when the instructions are complicated, or the level of students is SO low...(but generally speaking, IF the students have an incredibly low level, you just make the material that much easier and basic).

At some point though, if the level is that low, and the explanations of grammar are that well-needed...then it's probably better for that student to study with a Japanese person (or Korean or whatever) who can even the most basic of concepts or whatever. However in my experience, it is always easy to get an even easier and more basic textbook to teach out of instead.

ALSO...when students actually go to 'America' or wherever..and are in a mixed classroom, there isn't going to be some teacher translating everything into a dozen languages for all of the different student's origins.
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Old 07-23-2009, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Paramus, NJ
500 posts, read 1,255,084 times
Reputation: 207
^ I see. So, it's basically a 100 percent self-immersion type of class. Ok, thank you for explaining better. ^^;
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Old 07-28-2009, 02:11 AM
 
Location: Shanghai
7 posts, read 21,002 times
Reputation: 10
I am a Chinese,as the information I have.If war between Janpan and South Korea.The war will end very soon. South Korea is very sick in armament. They could even hard in defence of North Korea...
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Old 07-28-2009, 02:23 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,943 posts, read 36,139,074 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by spark06 View Post
I am a Chinese,as the information I have.If war between Janpan and South Korea.The war will end very soon. South Korea is very sick in armament. They could even hard in defence of North Korea...
Wow, that is bad information.

Japan doesn't even have an army.

Additionally, it is mandatory that all South Korean men serves two years of military service.

Additionally, there is a very large U.S. presense in both countries.

So, in other words, there wouldn't be a war between South Korea & Japan.

Secondly, Japan has no army, as of WWII, it was agreed that the U.S. would stand as their standing army. South Korea also uses the U.S. military. So if they went to war, it would be US soldiers fighting US soldiers, I guess? In other words, pretty much all your information is faulty.
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