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View Poll Results: Do you consider Philippine people Hispanic?
Yes 44 7.01%
Semi-Hispanic 143 22.77%
Not at all 441 70.22%
Voters: 628. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-13-2014, 08:23 PM
 
83 posts, read 154,309 times
Reputation: 77

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
What influence did the Hongkongnese, Singaporeans and Malaysians got from the English ? What influence did the Macanese get from the Portuguese ? While they might have gotten some, it is not as big as what the Filipinos got from the Spanish. Aside from being no. 3 most catholic country in the world, our traditions, cultural festivities, art, old music, dance , traditional clothing, food and ways were mostly influenced by Spain and Mexico.
My husband was just listening to Filipino folk songs and was really surprised because he said filipino folk songs sound so much like Latin American and Spanish songs.
Hong Kong and Taiwan were created and built up into modern cultures by the British. Like I said, much of the 'modernization' that took place in most of the world was as a result of British and other European globalization, which is the culture. My point is that most people don't see the modern globalist world we have as being so but it is largely based on the exploits of the British followed by a few other European empires. Like I said the fact that the language of commerce is English testifies to that fact. Modern Shopping malls, railroads, movies, the fashion and entertainment industry, beauty industry, airports and all of that stuff is mostly a British and/or European import. But because most people think of these things as "universal" they don't realize it is mostly a British or European import. But those are cultural artifacts no less as significant as food, dance, song and clothing, which you are speaking of when it comes to the Spanish. If you know about Michael Jackson, then you are impacted by English culture. Most of the well known actors, actresses, entertainers, models and artists are or derive from an English speaking culture.... To claim that there isn't as much of an impact is kinda ridiculous.

 
Old 08-14-2014, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,858,808 times
Reputation: 797
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyFox View Post
Hong Kong and Taiwan were created and built up into modern cultures by the British. Like I said, much of the 'modernization' that took place in most of the world was as a result of British and other European globalization, which is the culture. My point is that most people don't see the modern globalist world we have as being so but it is largely based on the exploits of the British followed by a few other European empires. Like I said the fact that the language of commerce is English testifies to that fact. Modern Shopping malls, railroads, movies, the fashion and entertainment industry, beauty industry, airports and all of that stuff is mostly a British and/or European import. But because most people think of these things as "universal" they don't realize it is mostly a British or European import. But those are cultural artifacts no less as significant as food, dance, song and clothing, which you are speaking of when it comes to the Spanish. If you know about Michael Jackson, then you are impacted by English culture. Most of the well known actors, actresses, entertainers, models and artists are or derive from an English speaking culture.... To claim that there isn't as much of an impact is kinda ridiculous.
These things are universal and exist everywhere in the world.
American pop culture is so much present in the Philippines since the Philippines was under America only 60 years ago and the influence they left is like the modern culture already ( government, modern education, malls, food chains and pop culture ). But we do not really consider these influence " Filipino culture " because pop culture, malls and international food chains are everywhere in the world .
I was talking mainly about culture in a deeper sense of the word and that's the impact the Spanish and Mexicans left in the Philippines. Culture that are only shared and understood in Hispanic nations.
 
Old 08-17-2014, 01:26 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,228 times
Reputation: 14
Having been unable to visit this thread for weeks since my first post, I was giddy to see if people responded to the articles I linked about the Filipino Identity only to be utterly disappointed upon seeing my comment deleted due to it being off-topic. I fail to see how it was off-topic when it tackles the very subject this thread was created for. Surely you would have read the articles I linked at least before deleting the post, no? Very disappointing action there, Mr./Ms. Moderator.

Anyway, allow me to share those links again, in the hope that it won't be wrongly judged as off-topic again and that it would shed some light on the issues of Filipino identity and its Hispanic origins.

First off is Nick Joaquin's, a National Artist for Literature, essay on Filipino Christianity as well as elaborating on the major influence of Spanish colonization into shaping what is now the Philippines.

Ikon, Friar and Conquistador | FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES

Following that is Guillermo Gomez Rivera's take on the Filipino identity, and why accepting our Spanish colonial history as a vital part of the Philippine history is one way for Filipinos to find and understand themselves as a people.

The Filipino Identity | FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES

These articles definitely belong to this thread and I am hoping that it will contribute fruitfully to the ongoing discussion.

Let me just leave this here: If the USA, or say Australia, had been fine and dandy with using English as their official language for hundreds of years due to British colonization, I don't see how accepting Spanish as an official language "again" is considered "colonial mentality" for Filipinos.

Last edited by SanjixNami; 08-17-2014 at 01:39 AM..
 
Old 08-17-2014, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,972,681 times
Reputation: 402
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanjixNami View Post
Having been unable to visit this thread for weeks since my first post, I was giddy to see if people responded to the articles I linked about the Filipino Identity only to be utterly disappointed upon seeing my comment deleted due to it being off-topic. I fail to see how it was off-topic when it tackles the very subject this thread was created for. Surely you would have read the articles I linked at least before deleting the post, no? Very disappointing action there, Mr./Ms. Moderator.

Anyway, allow me to share those links again, in the hope that it won't be wrongly judged as off-topic again and that it would shed some light on the issues of Filipino identity and its Hispanic origins.

First off is Nick Joaquin's, a National Artist for Literature, essay on Filipino Christianity as well as elaborating on the major influence of Spanish colonization into shaping what is now the Philippines.

Ikon, Friar and Conquistador | FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES

Following that is Guillermo Gomez Rivera's take on the Filipino identity, and why accepting our Spanish colonial history as a vital part of the Philippine history is one way for Filipinos to find and understand themselves as a people.

The Filipino Identity | FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES

These articles definitely belong to this thread and I am hoping that it will contribute fruitfully to the ongoing discussion.

Let me just leave this here: If the USA, or say Australia, had been fine and dandy with using English as their official language for hundreds of years due to British colonization, I don't see how accepting Spanish as an official language "again" is considered "colonial mentality" for Filipinos.
Quote:
The Filipino Civilization is a beautiful blending of the Spanish and the indigenous civilizations.
I quoted one of the line in that article


Pamulinawen Festival in Ilocos Norte is one, It's a Fusion Culture


Last edited by Oldhag1; 08-17-2014 at 06:52 AM.. Reason: No more than 2 videos per post. Read the guidelines
 
Old 08-17-2014, 07:34 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,228 times
Reputation: 14


To quote BBC presenter Rajan Datar in this recent BBC documentary about the Philippines, "And with its love of music, ceremony and religion, this country is more akin to South America than the rest of Southeast Asia." Personally, I think it's pretty damn cool that I can identify myself as both Asian and Hispanic (although I lean more on the Asian side).

Last edited by SanjixNami; 08-17-2014 at 08:02 AM..
 
Old 08-17-2014, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,858,808 times
Reputation: 797
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanjixNami View Post
Having been unable to visit this thread for weeks since my first post, I was giddy to see if people responded to the articles I linked about the Filipino Identity only to be utterly disappointed upon seeing my comment deleted due to it being off-topic. I fail to see how it was off-topic when it tackles the very subject this thread was created for. Surely you would have read the articles I linked at least before deleting the post, no? Very disappointing action there, Mr./Ms. Moderator.

Anyway, allow me to share those links again, in the hope that it won't be wrongly judged as off-topic again and that it would shed some light on the issues of Filipino identity and its Hispanic origins.

First off is Nick Joaquin's, a National Artist for Literature, essay on Filipino Christianity as well as elaborating on the major influence of Spanish colonization into shaping what is now the Philippines.

Ikon, Friar and Conquistador | FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES

Following that is Guillermo Gomez Rivera's take on the Filipino identity, and why accepting our Spanish colonial history as a vital part of the Philippine history is one way for Filipinos to find and understand themselves as a people.

The Filipino Identity | FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES

These articles definitely belong to this thread and I am hoping that it will contribute fruitfully to the ongoing discussion.

Let me just leave this here: If the USA, or say Australia, had been fine and dandy with using English as their official language for hundreds of years due to British colonization, I don't see how accepting Spanish as an official language "again" is considered "colonial mentality" for Filipinos.
You are not alone. Some of my posts got deleted as well and it's always the same reason " Off Topic ". It's not like I was talking about topics that were entirely out of this world.

Anyway, I visited the article of Senor Guillermo Gomez Rivera. I very much agree with the importance of Spanish in our curriculum for all of us Filipinos to know more about our past and recognise our true identity.

What I do not understand is why Spanish language in the Philippines is considered colonial mentality when we also have English as an official language but not considered colonial mentality ? Spanish played a more important role in the Philippine History, it should be given the same importance or even more.
 
Old 08-18-2014, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,858,808 times
Reputation: 797
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanjixNami View Post


To quote BBC presenter Rajan Datar in this recent BBC documentary about the Philippines, "And with its love of music, ceremony and religion, this country is more akin to South America than the rest of Southeast Asia." Personally, I think it's pretty damn cool that I can identify myself as both Asian and Hispanic (although I lean more on the Asian side).
Coming from a non Filipino ( talking about BBC presenter Rajan Datar )

Yes foreigners really have to go to the Philippines first before judging.
 
Old 08-19-2014, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Sanjo, Califas.
570 posts, read 371,868 times
Reputation: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanjixNami View Post
Having been unable to visit this thread for weeks since my first post, I was giddy to see if people responded to the articles I linked about the Filipino Identity only to be utterly disappointed upon seeing my comment deleted due to it being off-topic. I fail to see how it was off-topic when it tackles the very subject this thread was created for. Surely you would have read the articles I linked at least before deleting the post, no? Very disappointing action there, Mr./Ms. Moderator.

Anyway, allow me to share those links again, in the hope that it won't be wrongly judged as off-topic again and that it would shed some light on the issues of Filipino identity and its Hispanic origins.

First off is Nick Joaquin's, a National Artist for Literature, essay on Filipino Christianity as well as elaborating on the major influence of Spanish colonization into shaping what is now the Philippines.

Ikon, Friar and Conquistador | FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES

Following that is Guillermo Gomez Rivera's take on the Filipino identity, and why accepting our Spanish colonial history as a vital part of the Philippine history is one way for Filipinos to find and understand themselves as a people.

The Filipino Identity | FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES

These articles definitely belong to this thread and I am hoping that it will contribute fruitfully to the ongoing discussion.

Let me just leave this here: If the USA, or say Australia, had been fine and dandy with using English as their official language for hundreds of years due to British colonization, I don't see how accepting Spanish as an official language "again" is considered "colonial mentality" for Filipinos.

Wow! What a great post by escribbles.
All I can say is THANK YOU...
My ancestors went to your ancestors and became our ancestors.

Some day all of the walls that keep us apart will fall and our people will enjoy been together once again.
 
Old 08-24-2014, 07:13 AM
 
72 posts, read 74,751 times
Reputation: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyFox View Post
Hong Kong and Taiwan were created and built up into modern cultures by the British.
Hong Kong yes. Taiwan no. Taiwan belonged to China until 1895 at which time it was annexed by Japan, and remained a Japanese territory until 1945. After 1945 it was claimed by Chinese fleeing the communist revolution in mainland China. So no, Taiwan was not built up into modern culture by the British. Japan did a lot to do so when they owned it, and after that it was the Taiwanese themselves.



Quote:
Let me just leave this here: If the USA, or say Australia, had been fine and dandy with using English as their official language for hundreds of years due to British colonization, I don't see how accepting Spanish as an official language "again" is considered "colonial mentality" for Filipinos.

Neither the USA or Australia have an official language. There have been several proposals to do so(in the USA), but it has been struck time every time is was proposed. Now granted, it is the "de facto" language, and the one primarily used by the government, but there is no official language like many countries have.

Also, Filipinos are of a different circumstance than "Americans" or "Australians" that were colonized. The original "Americans" (Native Americans), and the original Australians (Aborigines), probably have a different take on English being the language most widely spoken. They just have no choice because they are outnumbered. Filipinos were always the majority in their country regardless of who governed their country.
 
Old 08-24-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Sanjo, Califas.
570 posts, read 371,868 times
Reputation: 116
I just don't get it!

Before the islands were just that with some incohesive tribes no one wanted to help them(just as scribbles points out)... now the Asians don't want them to join their brothers on the other side of the ocean, interesting.

They lost their real identity when the US invade them, they didn't form their culture, they disrupt them.

We say in Spanish EL QUE NO AYUDA, ESTORBA, meaning the one who don't help, obstruct.
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