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View Poll Results: Do you consider Philippine people Hispanic?
Yes 44 7.01%
Semi-Hispanic 143 22.77%
Not at all 441 70.22%
Voters: 628. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-06-2012, 12:11 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northstar22 View Post
East Timor is also a heavily Catholic Asian country. Vietnam has a sizable Catholic minority, as does South Korea.
East Timor is the most Catholic Asian country, but it has a population of 1 million so is numerically insignificant compared to the Philippines.

 
Old 02-06-2012, 03:31 AM
 
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Well someone mentioned Vietnam regarding Catholicism and there are at least 6.8% of the population there, yet Hong Kong and Macau have similar percentages for people that classify themselves Catholic and its 5%.

for the Phillipines its the most populated catholic country in Asia due to the legacy of the Spanish occupiers. However Spain did not colonise all of present day Phillipines and did not conquer the muslim majority regions in the south. However the Americans did occupy the muslim regions in the south. Of course Spanish influence is huge in the PHillipines and one of the official languages of there is Flipino and it has many Spanish derived words. There are many cities and towns that have Spanish sounding names there as well. Even so its an Asian country rather than an Hispanic country.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 04:05 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by other99 View Post
Well someone mentioned Vietnam regarding Catholicism and there are at least 6.8% of the population there, yet Hong Kong and Macau have similar percentages for people that classify themselves Catholic and its 5%.

for the Phillipines its the most populated catholic country in Asia due to the legacy of the Spanish occupiers. However Spain did not colonise all of present day Phillipines and did not conquer the muslim majority regions in the south. However the Americans did occupy the muslim regions in the south. Of course Spanish influence is huge in the PHillipines and one of the official languages of there is Flipino and it has many Spanish derived words. There are many cities and towns that have Spanish sounding names there as well. Even so its an Asian country rather than an Hispanic country.
In Vietnam Catholicism is concentrated a lot in certain places - obviously towns with a strong history of French influence, the larger centres, particularly in the South. There are many towns on the way from HCM to Nha Trang that strongly Catholic - I remember seeing at least a dozen such churches, all in a row, with statues of Christ, Virgin Mary.etc everywhere. In most of Vietnam you'll see lots of statues of the Buddha, but in these towns they were all Christian motifs. Since many Catholics fled from the north to the south prior to and during the War, they tend to be concentrated in the southern half of the country.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 07:05 AM
 
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I have two neighbours here in Spain that are Filipinos. One is a famous singer, Luis Eduardo Aute, born in Manila. The other died recently, he was a broker. He left Filipinas as a child after his parents were massacred by the Japanese.

Both are white, but in Spain there are also rich people from Filipinas with some Filipino blood (Isabel Preysler).

The ones that removed the Spanish influence from Filipinas were Japanese invaders. They massacred all the Spanish they could find (notwithstanding the fact that Spain was a neutral country in good terms with the axis).

In Spain, Las Filipinas are considered a Hispanic country. Filipinos only need two years of legal resindency to obtain citizenship.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 07:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pimpinel View Post
I have two neighbours here in Spain that are Filipinos. One is a famous singer, Luis Eduardo Aute, born in Manila. The other died recently, he was a broker. He left Filipinas as a child after his parents were massacred by the Japanese.

Both are white, but in Spain there are also rich people from Filipinas with some Filipino blood (Isabel Preysler).

The ones that removed the Spanish influence from Filipinas were Japanese invaders. They massacred all the Spanish they could find (notwithstanding the fact that Spain was a neutral country in good terms with the axis).

In Spain, Las Filipinas are considered a Hispanic country. Filipinos only need two years of legal resindency to obtain citizenship.
Would Western Sahara and Equatorial Guinea be considered Hispanic in Spain?
 
Old 02-06-2012, 07:39 AM
 
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No, of course not. Neither are Japanese and Taiwanese.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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Isn't Hispanic in the most common way I hear it here, a really US-centered concept that might not be thought of as the same in other parts of the world. The American or New World-centered definition has really shaped our perception.

In North America, Hispanic has such strong connotations of being the New World Spanish/Portuguese colonies and those that inhabit it, even to the point of losing it's connection with European Spain or Portugal. As well, Hispanic by the US definition is independent of race, an Amerindian Bolivian is just as Hispanic as an Afro-Brazilian, Peruvian-Japanese or Italian-Argentine, though people often forget this.

To put it into perspective, it's as though we came up with an identity term "Anglics" that refers to American, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand citizens, etc.. People in all these countries will now be all "Anglics" or New World Anglophones. regardless of if they are third-generation Italian-Americans, African Americans in the south, Navajo in New Mexico, Lebanese-Australians in Sydney, Montreal Anglophones, New Zealand Maori, etc.. Their defining feature, being part of the new world Anglosphere will trump all, just like how being part of the new world Hispanosphere defines Hispanics.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 11:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pimpinel View Post
No, of course not. Neither are Japanese and Taiwanese.
OF COURSE Japan and Taiwan are not hispanic...

BUT/PERO:
1. Equatorial Guinea is the only Spanish speaking country in Africa (1968)
2. Western Sahara was Spanish territory until taken over by Morocco (1976/1979)

so if they are not considered Hispanic country, why would the Philippines be considered Hispanic? Is it because people from Eq Guinea and W Sahara are black?
Also just like the Philippines, a citizen of Eq Guinea only needs 2 years of residency in Spain to become a citizen.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 12:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neutre View Post
°Many of the Philippines have Spanish surname.
That's because at one point the Spanish authorities were making people change their names to Spanish names. There ws a decree establishing the distribution of family names in the islands.

Changing one's surname does not make you Spanish (or English or...)
 
Old 02-06-2012, 12:05 PM
 
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The way the words "Hispanic" and "Latino" as they are used in North American English are particular to American English and do not always mean the same thing in English as they do in the Spanish language. It does become a bit confusing. But the most common word used when speaking of people who speak the Spanish language in Latin America is not "hispano" but rather "hispanoparlante" meaning a person whose first language is Spanish. The word "latino" is pretty much what it says. Something of Latin or Roman origin. So a Brazilian and, according to some scholars even a Romanian can be "latinos" but of course not "hispanoparlantes". But the Portuguese language has terminology much similar such as "lusitano" meaning people and things that pertain to Portugal and/or the language and culture. The same word exists in Spanish.
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