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View Poll Results: Do you consider Philippine people Hispanic?
Yes 44 7.01%
Semi-Hispanic 143 22.77%
Not at all 441 70.22%
Voters: 628. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-09-2012, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Hell
192 posts, read 645,824 times
Reputation: 140

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
If you're hoping for that you're disappointed...Spanish might be useful for Filipinos looking to immigrate to the United States, or if they want to live and work in Latin America, but within the islands themselves Spanish is becoming of less and less importance. Spanish has not been the language of the common people since the early 20th century in the Philippines - already a diverse mix of ethnic/tribal groups with their own languages. Even today, no one language maintains a plurality in the Philippines. Unlike English, Spanish only really has benefit in one half of the world. I personally do think Spanish has it's uses, but not for the average Filipino villager or urbanite in Manila.
No, I'm not disappointed. You are. Filipinos have special immigration status to immigrate to the U.S. because it was a colony of the U.S. ... nothing to do with the Spanish language.

You don't make any sense..."Spanish only really has benefit in one half of the world" (that's a lot of people) and then you said "Spanish has it's uses, but not for the average Filipino villager or urbanite in Manila" . Wha? Spanish sure has it's uses to half the world.

Sorry Trimac20, you can't take 330 years of Spanish influence in a country that Spain created. Can't. Looks like the combination of physical appearance of the average Filipino and the language of Spain combination bothers you. Can't do anything about that.

 
Old 02-09-2012, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Hell
192 posts, read 645,824 times
Reputation: 140
@jerrus, Amen to that!

Filipinos still care about it's Spanish influence othewise all of the catholic churches and towns with Spanish names would have been erased long time ago.
 
Old 02-09-2012, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Hell
192 posts, read 645,824 times
Reputation: 140
btw, Filipinos are genetically cousins to the Polynesians. There's scientific DNA to proved that. We all came from Africa and over thousands of years, man/woman migrated all over the globe and adapted to it's environment. The Austronesians (or Malay) originated from Taiwan then migrated to the Philippines, parts of south east asia, Madagascar (African country) and the rest of the islands in the Pacific. That's right, Filipinos have close blood brothers in Madagascar.

I'm crossing my fingers Trimac20 or minibrings (Trimac20's other account?) doesn't shut this extremely popular thread .
 
Old 02-09-2012, 07:35 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,421,991 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatalanb View Post
No, I'm not disappointed. You are. Filipinos have special immigration status to immigrate to the U.S. because it was a colony of the U.S. ... nothing to do with the Spanish language.

You don't make any sense..."Spanish only really has benefit in one half of the world" (that's a lot of people) and then you said "Spanish has it's uses, but not for the average Filipino villager or urbanite in Manila" . Wha? Spanish sure has it's uses to half the world.

Sorry Trimac20, you can't take 330 years of Spanish influence in a country that Spain created. Can't. Looks like the combination of physical appearance of the average Filipino and the language of Spain combination bothers you. Can't do anything about that.
Kind of personal, but I actually began my existence in the Philippines. I was most likely conceived although not born in the Philippines (long story). I've not visited since, but would love to.

By one half of the world I meant the Western Hemisphere.

I don't see any benefit in more Filipinos learning Espanol unless they want to move to the other side of the world.

The average Filipino is different from the average Latino.
 
Old 02-09-2012, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Liberal Coast
4,277 posts, read 5,171,824 times
Reputation: 3889
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatalanb View Post
Of course, it's going to be an uphill battle to learn Spanish but not impossible. Spanish is an easy language to learn if you're Filipino. I spent many many years in the P.I. and in fact, grew up in Pampanga. I used to speak Kapampangan and Tagalog. If you meant Filipinos being culturally Asian , yes, that's partly true. They are also culturally Hispanic and American. So obviously, you haven't been in the P.I. enough to realized the Hispanic influence.

Yes, the bases have been destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. They're gone. And the U.S. and the P.I. , despite the rough history between them, like to kiss each other's 'bum' (as you call it).
Actually, due to the similarity, Spanish can be very easy or very difficult for Filipinos to learn. My husband is one who has a very difficult time with it. It's too similar yet different, and he can't get the Tagalog out of his head enough to get the Spanish. This is a common problem when there are many similarities in the languages.

I do not consider the Philippine culture to be obviously Asian. Sure, it has some similarities. However, it has many differences.
 
Old 02-10-2012, 06:09 AM
 
4 posts, read 14,100 times
Reputation: 18
You have the Chabacano, creole Spanish, spoken by 600.000 people. Tagalog is truffled by many Spanish words, I don't think it would be a difficult language if you know Spanish and English.

I just read that Chabacano is also spoken in Malaysia and in Spanish territories plundered by Americans such as Guam.
 
Old 02-10-2012, 05:57 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,421,991 times
Reputation: 11862
It's a weird mix...it seems Spanish and British by far have the greatest colonial influence on nations. The others barely even seem to rate, even French.
 
Old 02-10-2012, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Liberal Coast
4,277 posts, read 5,171,824 times
Reputation: 3889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mortimerius View Post
You have the Chabacano, creole Spanish, spoken by 600.000 people. Tagalog is truffled by many Spanish words, I don't think it would be a difficult language if you know Spanish and English.

I just read that Chabacano is also spoken in Malaysia and in Spanish territories plundered by Americans such as Guam.
Not everyone speaks that language, though. The Spanish words that are used in some form or another in Tagalog is a big part of the problem. Most of the words will have a different spelling. Many people cannot get the Tagalog spellings out of their heads in order to remember the Spanish spellings. Some Spanish words are also in Tagalog but with different meanings. Etc, etc, etc.
 
Old 02-10-2012, 09:24 PM
 
2 posts, read 2,755 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatalanb View Post
@jerrus, Amen to that!

Filipinos still care about it's Spanish influence othewise all of the catholic churches and towns with Spanish names would have been erased long time ago.
They seem to like to have a mix of influences, Theres quite a lot of mixed spanish filipnos too in the phil as well . You can see the spanish blood in quite a few of the tv presenters in the phil. I like the Kfc stores from the americans when I visit there. there quite popular with the filipinos as well as mcdonalds and there making money. But the filipino brand of fast food jolly bee is still number one in fast foods for filipnos in the phil Its a strange mix of influences, but under the christianity religion it works well.
 
Old 02-10-2012, 10:24 PM
 
9,334 posts, read 19,470,374 times
Reputation: 4442
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatalanb View Post
No, I'm not disappointed. You are. Filipinos have special immigration status to immigrate to the U.S. because it was a colony of the U.S. ... nothing to do with the Spanish language.

You don't make any sense..."Spanish only really has benefit in one half of the world" (that's a lot of people) and then you said "Spanish has it's uses, but not for the average Filipino villager or urbanite in Manila" . Wha? Spanish sure has it's uses to half the world.

Sorry Trimac20, you can't take 330 years of Spanish influence in a country that Spain created. Can't. Looks like the combination of physical appearance of the average Filipino and the language of Spain combination bothers you. Can't do anything about that.
Where did you see that Filipinos have it easier ,I grating to the US? I have not heard of any special immigration status for them.

I looked at the INS website.. Nara. If u know something let me know, I have friends who'd want to come over in a heartbeat, but they even find it hard to get a visitor visa, albeit a permanent residence visa.
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