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View Poll Results: Do you consider Philippine people Hispanic?
Yes 44 7.01%
Semi-Hispanic 143 22.77%
Not at all 441 70.22%
Voters: 628. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-21-2012, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,967,579 times
Reputation: 402

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejay1 View Post
Tagalog is not the spoken language for all filipinos..how ignorant
he said when a Filipino Customers that speak tagalog and he didn't say ALL Filipinos. tagalog mostly the medium teaching in Philippine schools when it comes to Filipino subjects. "Araling Panlipunan, Sibika at Kultura, Panitikan" etc. although not the entire Philippines use it when it comes to communication because some don't know how to speak tagalog. but most of the population know and understand it eventhough they are not Tagalog.

 
Old 07-21-2012, 01:34 PM
 
Location: 'Murica
1,302 posts, read 2,423,680 times
Reputation: 817
Besides, AFAIK, the vast majority of Filipinos in America speak Tagalog.
 
Old 07-21-2012, 01:49 PM
 
1,487 posts, read 2,055,205 times
Reputation: 936
Most loan words com into a language because there is no native word for the concept and no way to makeup the term. When there is a word loan words can be confusing like in modern Japanese.
 
Old 07-21-2012, 01:56 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,003,989 times
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^not all loan words. I'm sure Filipinos already had words for but (pero), can (pwede), or (o), luck (swerte), meat (karne), etc etc but these words still became part of the language. Some of the loan words still have a native counterpart that's used as well
 
Old 07-21-2012, 02:10 PM
 
1,487 posts, read 2,055,205 times
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I think I said MOST not ALL. If the native language has sufficient vocabulary for a loan word then the loan word simply adds to the redundancy of that language. Again I point out that this is a problem considered by native Japanese language scholars.

Double vocabulary sometimes exist for cultural reasons like in Spanish the words "Castillo" from the Latin and the word "Alcazar" from the Arabic which originally mean the same thing. These words existed because of the physical division of Spain into Christian and Muslim Spain.
 
Old 07-21-2012, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,967,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
^not all loan words. I'm sure Filipinos already had words for but (pero), can (pwede), or (o), luck (swerte), meat (karne), etc etc but these words still became part of the language. Some of the loan words still have a native counterpart that's used as well
yeah like

Green - Verde (Spanish) in Tagalog we use "Luntian or Berde"
Blue - Azul (Spanish) in tagalog we use "Bughaw or Asul"

changing the V to B, from Z to S
 
Old 07-21-2012, 02:25 PM
 
1,487 posts, read 2,055,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinai View Post
yeah like

Green - Verde (Spanish) in Tagalog we use "Luntian or Berde"
Blue - Azul (Spanish) in tagalog we use "Bughaw or Asul"

changing the V to B, from Z to S
The confusion between B and V as well as between S, Z, and C are common mistakes in Spanish for people who may speal only Spanish..
 
Old 07-21-2012, 03:10 PM
 
985 posts, read 3,262,839 times
Reputation: 413
Default Filipinås

Quote:
Originally Posted by ejay1 View Post
IMO loosing the name Philippines isnt that big a deal
Is there any plan from the government on loosing the name?

And the people would then stop calling themselves Filipinås?
 
Old 07-21-2012, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,967,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neutre View Post
Gracias! I'm sending them to my Spanish friend.
lol don't forget the <Pu to> which is rice cake in tagalog but in spanish lol male prostitute
 
Old 07-21-2012, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,967,579 times
Reputation: 402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neutre View Post
Is there any plan from the government on loosing the name?

And the people would then stop calling themselves Filipinås?
I don't think the government have any plans to change the name even the dictator he didn't even change it. To change the name then they have to remove everything which is also those attached to it. I don't think majority will agree on this & most of the politician are the descendants of Illustrados & Principalia

Surnames
Food
Religion
Music and Dance
Literature
Spanish loanwords
Street/Province/City Names
Architectural design/Church/Houses
National Dress
Mestizos (How about this?)
Festivals

It's like removing everything that was already installed to someone's Identity.
How about the other influences that doesn't belong to Spanish? American, Indian, Chinese, Middle Eastern/Arab Influences?

I read that some don't actually consider Jose Rizal as their national hero because Rizal has Spanish blood on his veins
that he wrote his novels in Spanish. So I guess they have to change also some of the Philippines national heroes including
Bonifacio and Gabriela Silang as they are mestizos - some of our Illustrado national heroes.

Marcelo H. del Pilar (1850–1896)
Félix Resurrección Hidalgo (1855–1913)
Graciano López Jaena (1856–1896)
Antonio Luna (1866–1899)
Juan Luna (1857–1899)
Mariano Ponce (1863–1918)

Quote:
The most prominent Ilustrados were Graciano López Jaena, Marcelo H. del Pilar, Mariano Ponce, Antonio Luna and José Rizal, the Philippine national hero. Rizal’s novels Noli Me Tangere ("Touch Me Not") and El filibusterismo ("The Subversive") “exposed to the world the injustices imposed on Filipinos under the Spanish colonial regime”.[7][9]

In the beginning, Rizal and his fellow Ilustrados preferred not to win independence from Spain, instead they yearned legal equality for both Peninsulares and natives—Indios, Insulares, and mestizos, among others—in the colony. Among the political, religious and economic reforms demanded by the Ilustrados were that “the Philippines be represented in the Cortes and be considered as a province of Spain” and “the secularization of the parishes.”[8][9]

However, in 1872, nationalist sentiment grew strongest, when three Filipino priests, “charged with leading a military mutiny at an arsenal in Cavite, near Manila”, were executed by the Spanish authorities. The event and “other repressive acts outraged the Ilustrados.[8] Because of his anti-clerical writings and activities, Rizal was executed on December 30, 1896. His execution propelled the Ilustrados . This also prompted unity among the Ilustrados and Andrés Bonifacio’s radical Katipunan.[8] Philippine policies by the United States reinforced the dominant position of the Ilustrados within Filipino society. Friar estates were sold to the Ilustrados and most government positions were offered to them.[8]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilustrado

They want Lapu-Lapu to replace Rizal as national hero although Lapu-Lapu is already one of the Philippine Heroes.

Last edited by pinai; 07-21-2012 at 05:07 PM..
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