U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Do you consider Philippine people Hispanic?
Yes 44 7.01%
Semi-Hispanic 143 22.77%
Not at all 441 70.22%
Voters: 628. You may not vote on this poll

Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 01-01-2014, 01:57 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by crisp444 View Post
Again, I have to stress that being "Latino" is all about culture. You don't have to be from Latin America or Latin Europe to consider yourself "Latino" if you culturally identify with being such.

Why is it that people don't bat an eye if a Mexican-American who doesn't even speak Spanish labels himself as "Latino"? If he was born and raised in this country and knows little or nothing about the Latin culture, he is far more "Anglo" than "Latino." People like this are called gringos when they actually go to real Latin countries. I know that's an entire thread of its own, but even gringo is a purely cultural term that has absolutely nothing to do with race or color - it means "foreigner to the Latin culture."

I have met a few Filipinos in my lifetime who most definitely consider themselves "Latino" - the reason why is because they identify with the Latin culture. [One of them moved to Miami and another moved to Spain, largely because they felt they would be more comfortable there than in places like San Francisco and New York.] This is getting less and less common in the Philippines as the years pass. Spanish influence there has been on the wane for years now and it is no longer common for them to learn Spanish, watch television and news in Spanish, and listen to music in Spanish. People who identify with Latin culture compose only a small percentage of the population nowadays, which is mostly made up of old people (who grew up when Latin influence was much stronger) and the tiny minority of young people who are of mixed Spanish and native-Filipino heritage or of full Spanish heritage.

With all of that said, I stress that only a small minority of Filipinos are "Latino" and that number is decreasing as the years pass. Overall, the Latin influence has waned so much there that it is not really a Latin country - as a whole - anymore.
Latin influences are very strong in Philippines. That's the root and base of Filipino culture, gastronomy, folklore, integrity, morals, values, intuition and esoteric spiritual consciousness.

Based on your logic, you'd probably say Philippines is Anglo or Brittanic due to the USA occupying it and imposing English. Hmm -_-

O_o

Spanish is still very important in Philippines and remains to and at it's core in Philippines.

What about Puerto Rico or Guam or Samoa? Would you say they aren't Latin or Hispanic due to USA occupation? Many of the cultural traits and language remain in these cultures and folklore.

 
Old 01-01-2014, 02:07 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golem1979 View Post
Most Filipinos have either an Asian or a Pacific Islander phenotype. Only a very small minority of Filipinos have a Hispanic looking phenotype. So no Filipinos should not be lumped into the came category as Mexicans, Guatemalans, Nicaraguans, etc.
But oh how you are dead wrong and mistaken. Mexicans, Guatemalans, Nicaraguans etc can be of any race and have any phenotype.

Also there is no such thing as looking Hispanic. Hispanic is NOT a race. Hispanic just means coming from a Spanish speaking country. Hispanics can be of any race. Ppl of all races and racial admixtures have been living in the new world since 1492. It's not rocket science.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 04:00 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by españolamexicana View Post
i'm hispanic & for me filipinos in general are not hispanic coz:

1. they don't speak spanish. yes there have some spanish in tagalog but majority is no spanish. the language is very very far from spanish so the some spanish words there isn't enough

2. their cultures overall are asian. sure there is spanish influences but filipino culture is predominantly asian & have more in common w/ chinese, malaysians & indonesians than spanish or latin americans. also its more close to americans than spanish.

3. more than 95% of filipino people are of asian origin & only very tiny percent have hispanic heritage.

although spain colonized phils, overall there wasn't any big impact aside from the catholic religion & surnames, unlike in latin america. the people were able to retained their malay offsprings, customs & way of life. honestly whenever i talk to filipinos, i feel like talking to a chinese, malaysians or indonesians & without the same connection as i have when i'm with my fellow latinos. sorry guys but you just need to accept the fact that you can't be hispanics & don't try to squeeze yourself into something you're not. just because there are tiny percent of hispano-filipinos there doesn't make filipinos hispanic. US & UK has a lot more hispanic population than phils but never hear their local people claiming themselves hispanics. you just concentrate on being asians.
LOL! And what do you define as "Asian culture"? What is the starting point or ending point of what constitutes Asian culture?

Filipinos culture has way more in common with Mexicans and Spaniards.

Hispanic is NOT a race. A person being Hispanic does NOT stop them from being Asian. Asian and Hispanic are NOT mutually exclusive.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 04:07 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by españolamexicana View Post
"Filipinos are not really closely related to Mainland Asians. "... then what about that pancit, lumpia & those some i meet actually believe in feng shui, those are from mainland asia right? well you're right but its sad many i meet seem dont know or just ignore this part of theirselves. what i mean here are those that claiming to be spanish or hispanic but no ways to prove it other than their surnames. i'm not pointing to those who truly believes or embraces their true malayan identity nor to those less than 3% people with real spanish blood.
That's a silly analogy you made. We could argue that Mexicans are French based on your analogy because of Cinco de Mayo and how French bread and cooking techniques were adapted into Mexican culture and fetishized.

Many Chinese often have culture that spreads to other nations because Chinese migrate to other areas but that doesn't mean it's traditional to those other nations when it was imported or brought their by outside group.

Chinese are a minority and their culture in Philippines is not as strong as Spanish cultural influences. Philippines has way more in common with Spain and Mexico than with other nations at it's core.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 04:10 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
How familiar are you with Spanish and Filipino culture ?
Do you know our cultural and religious festivities ?

We practice Fiestas everywhere in the Philippines all through out the year
We celebrate Semana Santa ( procession of images that was taken from Spain and reenactment of the crucifixion of the Lord taken from Mexico
We celebrate Christmas and we do Misa de Gallo ( 9 consecutive days of Novena similar to Mexico )
We eat Paella ( Spain's national food ) and in fact, we already consider it our own.
Spanish Foods that became Filipino foods -- Caldereta, Afritada, Cocido, Embutido, Lengua Estufada, Pastel de Pollo, Menudo, Tamales , Ensaimada, Mamon, Pastillas de Leche, Yemas, Crema de Fruta, Tocino del Cielo, Flan de Leche, Polvoron, Turones de Mani etc.
Our symbol is Lechon which is present all over Latin America and was introduced by Spain to all of it's colonies but became our national symbol
Our national desert is Flan de Leche ( Leche Flan ) taken from Spain

We play Jai Alai which is also a favourite in Spain

We have Debut which is Quincinera in Latin America ( big party for an 18 yr. old girl to be introduced to the society

We have Pinata in our birthdays as well

If you listen to our old Filipino songs, they sound so much like Mexican songs

Mexican old dance are similar to Filipino old dance

I am glad we are Catholic. I can't imagine having a different religion and not celebrating Christmas.
I am glad I have a Spanish surname. I won't be so happy having native surname.


+1
 
Old 01-01-2014, 04:20 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
As a Fil-Am, bringing up colonial heritage helps make it easier to explain to non-Filipinos about our Spanish last names, Catholic faith, etc.


There's a reason why generalizing is a bad thing. I actually have a Filipino friend who has recently renounced his Catholic faith because he explained that it is a "white man's religion" and following it would only keep the Conquistador memory alive (as if they "saved" them). Instead, he is researching/studying more about pre-colonial Philippines, which would include elements of Austronesian/Malay culture. For example, the Baybayin script and music styles like kulintangan, gabbang, and agong. ETC

I think the people of Philippines are a proud and resilient people. This explains why Filipinos don't speak Spanish like Mexicans do. (for comparison, Philippines was colonized by Spain for 333 years and Mexico was colonized by Spain for 302 years).

Aside from religion, Filipinos have close ethnic/linguistic ties with their Malaysian and Indonesian neighbors. For example, some vocabulary similarities between Tagalog(T) and Malaysian/Indonesian, respectively: (note that there's much more, which can be found here)

sakit: sick, or pain
langit: sky
payong(T)/payung: umbrella
kambing(T)/kambeng: goat
otak/utak(T): brain
tolong/tulong(T): help
bangun/bangon(T): get up, or wake up.
papa ko(T)/papaku: my dad
mama ko(T)/mamaku: my mom
anak: son, or daughter
kanan: right
tanghali(T)/tangah hari: afternoon, or late
duryan(T):/durian: its that stinky fruit!!
sarap(T)/sedap: taste good
ikaw(T)/engkau: you, or yours, or your
kami: us
sanggol(T)/sanggul: baby, or young one
halaga(T)/haraga: importance
babae(T)/bibi: girl/woman/female
lalaki(T)/lelaki: boy/man/male
dagat(T)/darat: sea
pasok: enter, come in

Also keep in mind that it is just a comparison with Tagalog words. If you bring up other Filipino languages like Cebuano or Ilocano, similarities with Malaysian/Indonesian can also be found I'm sure.


Not at first, actually. It was more like convert to Catholicism or die when the Spaniards first arrived. So in that regard BrownThor is correct in that it was not a consensual process. It's not like the Filipinos were waiting at the shore with open arms and ready to be converted and "saved". Of course as decades/centuries passed, Catholicism is deeply-rooted in Filipino culture as it was passed on from generation to generation to the present day. Just like Smtchll stated earlier, history has already "happened" and therefore Filipinos are semi-Hispanic in culture. (Though I must argue that Filipinos would not be 100% Hispanic if they hypothetically spoke Spanish as a native tongue.)

Furthermore, we have to keep in mind that Islam arrived to the "Philippines" first in the 1300s (and Hinduism/Buddhism before that). This means neighboring countries like Malaysia and Indonesia provide insight on what the pre-colonial "Philippines" may have been like and what it may have been today had the Spanish never arrived. (note: I put Philippines in quotation marks for the last two sentences because it had a different name back then such as Ma-i or Mahárlika, etc.)

Even going further back, the peoples of the Malay archipelago (includes Indonesia, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia and East Timor) had much in common since they were all of Austronesian stock. It just seems superficial for Filipinos to focus on the recent 333 years of Spanish colonial rule and forget about everything else before. Then again, this is why I explain that religion is what drives a wedge between the Philippines and Malaysia/Indonesia (with the Muslim Filipinos of southern Philippines being an exception). And then there's also other factors such as Euro-centrism (feeling "superior" for having Western influences, etc.)

It seems conflicting for a Filipino to embrace his/her Spanish colonial heritage yet celebrate Philippine Independence Day and historical figures like Lapu-Lapu (who was involved in the Battle of Mactan that killed Magellan).

I acknowledge Filipinos are culturally semi-Hispanic due to the 333 years of Spanish colonial rule, BUT there is more to Filipino culture than that. Think about it...if Filipinos are semi-Hispanic, what is the other "semi" to complete the Filipino culture? For lack of a proper/better term at this time, that would be "semi-Malay". It's just that religion and geo-politics (for example, the recent Sabah conflict with Malaysia and also the Spratly Islands dispute, etc.) is what separates Filipinos from their neighboring Malay brothers.

To summarize, Filipino culture = semi-Hispanic + semi-Malay (with trace amounts of Indian/Chinese/Japanese influence)

EDIT: Also, it seems that only Spanish-influenced Filipino dance/music were conveniently posted in the thread. Here is an example of Kulingtan of the southern Philippines which pre-dates Spanish influence...


for more information, here's a good comparison between the Philippines and Malaysia
LOL @ Catholicism and Christianity being a white man's religion. That's bull****. Christianity did not originate in Europe. Also Arabs and Muslims had racist, colorist, classist and oppressive slave trading of all races of people and imposed and thrust Islam onto the peoples it conquested, conquered, and subjugated.

Christianity came to Europe much later on. Also it wad Arabs and Islam that helped work with and set up the European slave trades and European colonialism. Arabs worked with Europeans.

The real culprits are the Arabs and Muslim/Islam. Look up the Arab slave trade. It has been going on since ancient times and it's STILL going on today. They still refer to black and African descended and darker skinned people as "abd" which means slave.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 04:32 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
As a Fil-Am, bringing up colonial heritage helps make it easier to explain to non-Filipinos about our Spanish last names, Catholic faith, etc.


There's a reason why generalizing is a bad thing. I actually have a Filipino friend who has recently renounced his Catholic faith because he explained that it is a "white man's religion" and following it would only keep the Conquistador memory alive (as if they "saved" them). Instead, he is researching/studying more about pre-colonial Philippines, which would include elements of Austronesian/Malay culture. For example, the Baybayin script and music styles like kulintangan, gabbang, and agong. ETC

I think the people of Philippines are a proud and resilient people. This explains why Filipinos don't speak Spanish like Mexicans do. (for comparison, Philippines was colonized by Spain for 333 years and Mexico was colonized by Spain for 302 years).

Aside from religion, Filipinos have close ethnic/linguistic ties with their Malaysian and Indonesian neighbors. For example, some vocabulary similarities between Tagalog(T) and Malaysian/Indonesian, respectively: (note that there's much more, which can be found here)

sakit: sick, or pain
langit: sky
payong(T)/payung: umbrella
kambing(T)/kambeng: goat
otak/utak(T): brain
tolong/tulong(T): help
bangun/bangon(T): get up, or wake up.
papa ko(T)/papaku: my dad
mama ko(T)/mamaku: my mom
anak: son, or daughter
kanan: right
tanghali(T)/tangah hari: afternoon, or late
duryan(T):/durian: its that stinky fruit!!
sarap(T)/sedap: taste good
ikaw(T)/engkau: you, or yours, or your
kami: us
sanggol(T)/sanggul: baby, or young one
halaga(T)/haraga: importance
babae(T)/bibi: girl/woman/female
lalaki(T)/lelaki: boy/man/male
dagat(T)/darat: sea
pasok: enter, come in

Also keep in mind that it is just a comparison with Tagalog words. If you bring up other Filipino languages like Cebuano or Ilocano, similarities with Malaysian/Indonesian can also be found I'm sure.


Not at first, actually. It was more like convert to Catholicism or die when the Spaniards first arrived. So in that regard BrownThor is correct in that it was not a consensual process. It's not like the Filipinos were waiting at the shore with open arms and ready to be converted and "saved". Of course as decades/centuries passed, Catholicism is deeply-rooted in Filipino culture as it was passed on from generation to generation to the present day. Just like Smtchll stated earlier, history has already "happened" and therefore Filipinos are semi-Hispanic in culture. (Though I must argue that Filipinos would not be 100% Hispanic if they hypothetically spoke Spanish as a native tongue.)

Furthermore, we have to keep in mind that Islam arrived to the "Philippines" first in the 1300s (and Hinduism/Buddhism before that). This means neighboring countries like Malaysia and Indonesia provide insight on what the pre-colonial "Philippines" may have been like and what it may have been today had the Spanish never arrived. (note: I put Philippines in quotation marks for the last two sentences because it had a different name back then such as Ma-i or Mahárlika, etc.)

Even going further back, the peoples of the Malay archipelago (includes Indonesia, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia and East Timor) had much in common since they were all of Austronesian stock. It just seems superficial for Filipinos to focus on the recent 333 years of Spanish colonial rule and forget about everything else before. Then again, this is why I explain that religion is what drives a wedge between the Philippines and Malaysia/Indonesia (with the Muslim Filipinos of southern Philippines being an exception). And then there's also other factors such as Euro-centrism (feeling "superior" for having Western influences, etc.)

It seems conflicting for a Filipino to embrace his/her Spanish colonial heritage yet celebrate Philippine Independence Day and historical figures like Lapu-Lapu (who was involved in the Battle of Mactan that killed Magellan).

I acknowledge Filipinos are culturally semi-Hispanic due to the 333 years of Spanish colonial rule, BUT there is more to Filipino culture than that. Think about it...if Filipinos are semi-Hispanic, what is the other "semi" to complete the Filipino culture? For lack of a proper/better term at this time, that would be "semi-Malay". It's just that religion and geo-politics (for example, the recent Sabah conflict with Malaysia and also the Spratly Islands dispute, etc.) is what separates Filipinos from their neighboring Malay brothers.

To summarize, Filipino culture = semi-Hispanic + semi-Malay (with trace amounts of Indian/Chinese/Japanese influence)

EDIT: Also, it seems that only Spanish-influenced Filipino dance/music were conveniently posted in the thread. Here is an example of Kulingtan of the southern Philippines which pre-dates Spanish influence...


for more information, here's a good comparison between the Philippines and Malaysia
You do realize that Arabs, Muslim, and Islam are the ones behind the ethnocentrism and oppression of Africans and Asians right? Arabs and Muslims were colonizers too and they had slave trades and were racist as ****ing hell. They IMPOSED Islam on peoples in Asia and Africa and are still oppressing people today with slavery and everything and what not. In fact they have done more damage than Europeans have done and they were even the perpetrators and culprits behind European global colonialism and supremacy since Europeans were victims of Arab and Muslim Islamic supremacy and colonization and Europeans utilized that, but it's the Arabs and Islam that was the global perpetrator and problem and the true culprits if anyone has to be called out. IJS saying.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 04:44 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
This begs the question: Is Philippines more Hispanic or more Malay? Which one dominates Philippines culture more?

It's questions like that which make it important to discuss Malay Philippines in this thread because it will help decide whether Philippine culture is semi-Hispanic or completely Hispanic. You can't describe a coin without discussing its two sides right?

And what about grammatical structure? I think that is more important than vocabulary. This is why Tagalog is still considered an Austronesian language and not a Romance language like Italian, French, Portuguese, Spanish. A Spaniard tourist can probably get around with his native language in Portugal and Italy for example. What about a Filipino?

Here's an outside example: Romanian has adopted a lot of Slavic (Russian) vocabulary yet is still considered a Romance/Latin language.

As I've pointed out earlier, it's interesting to note that the Spaniards colonized the Philippines longer than Mexico yet Filipinos have resisted adopting Spanish as a native language. Why is that?

333 years of colonial rule VS. thousands of years as being part of the Malay archipelago

Yes, the Spaniards have definitely left their mark on Filipino culture but have not completely wiped out their "Malayness."

It's just mind-boggling that Filipinos choose to focus on the recent centuries of colonialism yet ignore their rich history that existed and thrived before Spanish arrival.
Spanish was the official language of Philippines until 1987. And plans are in store to make it the national and official language again of the Philippines. Spanish is still taught and/or recognized in goveremt, education, and in schools.

Chavacano which is mostly a Spanish based Creole has prevalence in millions if Filipinos and Spanish influences continue to remain abound everywhere and very much so prevalent.

It was the USA that wrongfully forced Filipinos to downplay their Spanish culture, heritage, and roots. During the first few decades of USA occupation in the Philippines, Spanish language and culture was strengthened and used by many and leaders of anti USA occupation communicated and channeled their esoteric, spiritual, and material culture and moral values and integrity through it's Spanish and Hispanic heritages. The USA's controlling presence helped to strengthen Hispanic culture, identity and traditions and greater and wider use of Spanish among Filipinos to become more unified and to break free of the chains of USa occupation.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 04:47 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr bolo View Post
besides the Philippines there are also many Asian Hispanics from Latin America

Chinese Hispanics, Japanese Peruvians, Brazil, Puerto Rico, etc

Today, the overwhelming majority of Asian Latin Americans are of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean decent

Im sure many of them are also culturally hispanic after living in those countries
Asian Latin American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Filipinos and Malaysians and Austronesians groups are the oldest Asian Latin Americans and Asian U.S. Americans. They have been in the Western hemisphere since 1492. People seem to forget that.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 04:54 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,136 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
With some conversations in Tagalog, a Spanish speaker who also knows English could get the gist of the conversation. It depends on the topic though. But I'm glad that the Spanish language didn't take over in the Philippines as it did in the other colonies. We have at least 150 different languages and most are thriving. The major regional languages have local news in their language, music, books, TV shows, films, and the children in those regions have that language as the medium of instruction in grades K-3.
Spanish is still prevalent and important in the Philippines. It needs to be restored as the official and national main language in addition to Chavacano. Other languages could be recognized as well too for their relevance but Spain and Spanish and Spaniards are a very important part of Pinoy history and culture. ¡Ya tu sabe!
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top