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View Poll Results: Do you consider Philippine people Hispanic?
Yes 44 7.01%
Semi-Hispanic 143 22.77%
Not at all 441 70.22%
Voters: 628. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-14-2014, 03:01 AM
 
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and I don't think the most similar group of people to Filipinos are Indonesians/Malaysians. I think it's the Chamorros of Guam. They share our Austronesian roots, they were colonized by Spain (they were essentially part of the Philippines), then they were a territory of the US, along with the Philippines, but instead of joining the Philippines in becoming an independent country, they chose to stick with the US. You won't find a more similar group of people to Filipinos, although they're considered Pacific Islanders

 
Old 03-14-2014, 03:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
to me, "not at all" means there's no Spanish/Latin American culture, history, food, language at all. So that's why it's confusing to see that most people voted that way. But I guess everyone interprets it differently. Most people see Filipinos as Asian, so they probably dont think that a country can be Asian and Hispanic at the same time
I guess it's a matter of interpretation. I just chose that as a simple "No", while interpreting "Semi-Hispanic" as having about 50% Hispanic culture compared to Latin America.
 
Old 03-14-2014, 03:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
and I don't think the most similar group of people to Filipinos are Indonesians/Malaysians. I think it's the Chamorros of Guam. They share our Austronesian roots, they were colonized by Spain (they were essentially part of the Philippines), then they were a territory of the US, along with the Philippines, but instead of joining the Philippines in becoming an independent country, they chose to stick with the US. You won't find a more similar group of people to Filipinos, although they're considered Pacific Islanders
Yes, they are. Of course if Chamorros are considered Hispanic, then so are Filipinos. I haven't read that to be the case for the US census definition though. Reason I bring up Malaysians and Indonesians is because they represent Asian culture that Filipinos have that are not derived from Spain.
 
Old 03-15-2014, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
I'm voting "Not at all" and the reason is not because the Philippines has no Spanish influence, but the Spanish influence is much, much less compared to the least Hispanic of any Latin American country. I think the most indigenous (and therefore least Hispanic) of the Latin American countries are Guatemala and Bolivia. However, Spanish is still the main official language there, and as many as 85% or more of the people there can still speak Spanish (even though a lot do not speak it as a first language). Also, as much as 40 to 50% in both countries still have some Spanish ancestry (either identifying as white or mestizo). Contrast that with the Philippines wherein the only people who can speak Spanish are very few, even if we include Chavacano. As a percentage, that will be much, much less compared to any "Hispanic" country. I am also sure that less than 25% of the Philippine population can claim to have 12.5% or more Spanish ancestry. Also, based on US census publications, there has been no specific mention of the Philippines as being Hispanic, and most Filipinos I know do not self-identify as such unless they have significant Spanish ancestry.
Not at all is like saying there is no Spanish culture in the Philippines and 333 of Spanish colonisation never existed.
Being hispanic doesn't mean having Spanish ancestry otherwise Philippines wouldn't have been included in the La Hispanidad organisation.
 
Old 03-15-2014, 02:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
I guess it's a matter of interpretation. I just chose that as a simple "No", while interpreting "Semi-Hispanic" as having about 50% Hispanic culture compared to Latin America.
Fair enough. "Semi" is usually interpreted as at least 50% anyways. Due to the semantics, this poll should have been revised to include a fourth option, one between "semi-Hispanic" and "no, not at all."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Without the Spanish, there wouldn't have been a united Philippines.
And Mindanao may have belonged to Malaysia in an alternate history. Either way, "Philippines" would inevitably be colonized even if the Spanish never arrived since the islands were not united and thus could not defend themselves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
I grew up around many Filipinos and my cousin is Married to one. From what I have seen, Filipinos relate more to other Asians than to Hispanics. I am Mexican and my Filipino friends like hanging out in Asian areas where there are boba shops and Asian cafes. Alot of them, even though they are from areas with a large Mexican population, do not frequent Mexican restaurants or food places very often. In most of my jobs, they don't hang out with Hispanics in a 'we are the same' type of way.
I must corroborate with your personal experiences as well, to an extent. I too live in a big city that has large Filipino and Mexican communities as the minority populations. Although they are more-or-less on friendly terms, they usually keep to their own and are largely ignorant of their "Hispanic similarities."

I think language plays a huge role in their sociocultural divide. For example, I have a Mexican co-worker who tried to mock the Filipino language (in a friendly joking way) and it sounding more like Chinese/Viet with the ching chong sounds and such. It's not like a Mexican will hear/notice a random Spanish word/phrase that a Filipino person said and say, "Hey, I noticed you have some Spanish in your language....let's be friends!" The Mexicans also like to listen to loud mariachi-type music and the youth embrace a sort of cholo/chicano/azteca pride culture, something that Filipinos cannot relate with.

For an interesting observation, it seems Filipinos are assimilating Pacific Islander culture to their own. Just go to any local Filipino cultural festival and you will see hula dances, and a lot of Filipino youth will claim "Pacific Islander pride." I think this is due to the fact that "Asian pride" is usually stereotyped and associated with East Asian culture, and a lot of ignorant people fail to realize that China/Japan/Korea/Vietnam do not solely represent Asians and Asian culture.

Although both groups are lumped together as "brown people," Filipinos and Mexicans have distinct phenotypes which also plays one (of many) factors in the hindrance of finding commonalities between the two groups. As an example, if you take out the language factor, a Filipino could easily blend in a crowd of Malaysian/Indonesian people and not so much in a crowd of Central/South American people.

On the other hand, Mexican food is quite popular with the Filipino youth (at least the Fil-Ams), especially with the California burritos and carne asada fries (which ironically, is Americanized and not really Mexican).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Not at all is like saying there is no Spanish culture in the Philippines and 333 of Spanish colonisation never existed.
The problem here is that Filipinos who DO embrace the 333 years of Spanish colonization tend to have a mentality that thousands of years of thriving, pre-Hispanic Austronesian society never existed at all.

Last edited by kanjelman7; 03-15-2014 at 02:51 PM..
 
Old 03-15-2014, 06:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
The problem here is that Filipinos who DO embrace the 333 years of Spanish colonization tend to have a mentality that thousands of years of thriving, pre-Hispanic Austronesian society never existed at all.
No, I dont sense that at all. Filipinos dont call themselves Hispanic (because the term is unheard of in the Philippines) but most Filipinos do consider themselves part of the "Malay race" It shows that they're aware of pre-Spanish history.

I remember a few years ago when the historical fiction TV shows like this were popular.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9GnNX0oUbc

The funny thing is, the main character is played by a half Spanish half Filipino But it somewhat fits, because the princesses were light-skinned.
 
Old 03-16-2014, 01:44 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post

The problem here is that Filipinos who DO embrace the 333 years of Spanish colonization tend to have a mentality that thousands of years of thriving, pre-Hispanic Austronesian society never existed at all.
That's why I voted Semi-Hispanic because I acknowledge both my native Pre-Hispanic culture and the culture that is part Filipino which origin can be traced during the Spanish Occupation. Like for example my religion, I am Catholic. I respect Filipinos that are Animist or Filipinos that are Muslims or other Non-Catholics or those Anti-Hispanic sometimes they used Spanish era to dissed our religion & culture that is not part of Pre-Hispanic.

Last edited by pinai; 03-16-2014 at 01:56 AM..
 
Old 03-17-2014, 04:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
most Filipinos do consider themselves part of the "Malay race" It shows that they're aware of pre-Spanish history.
What migration model are Filipino students usually taught these days? Is it from PI to Malaysia/Indonesia or the other way around?

They should at least update the curriculum so that Filipinos will consider themselves as part of the "Austronesian race" since "Malay race" is kinda outdated.
 
Old 03-17-2014, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
The problem here is that Filipinos who DO embrace the 333 years of Spanish colonization tend to have a mentality that thousands of years of thriving, pre-Hispanic Austronesian society never existed at all.
See, I am most interested in this. There almost no trace of pinoy's pagan heritage. All that seems to remain after islamic influence and Spanish influence are Sanskrit words in Tagalog. Pinoy's don't even talk about the pagan past or maybe they don't even know. How much influence was from there hindu/buddhist kingdoms in southeast asia? Maybe its kind of like the same attitude when when you tell an asian muslim that their ancestors were kafirs. The closest thing i can find on the subject is:

The Indianized States of South-East Asia - George Cds - Google Books

But that focuses mostly on indonesia, malaysia, and indo-china.


What did the pinoy's even call themselves before king phillip of spain? And why would name your nationality after a european that enslaved you?

Why don't all pinoys return to paganism? it might solve all the problems between the xtians, Saracens, and communists.

As for hispanicness, the culture still seems very hispanic. Even with american colonialism, pinoys still retained spanish names instead of adopting anglo ones. Pinoy culture seems like an anomaly when comparing to the rest of asia. Even though koreans are heavily xtianized, they still retain most of their native culture. Their english sucks though.
 
Old 03-17-2014, 08:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
What migration model are Filipino students usually taught these days? Is it from PI to Malaysia/Indonesia or the other way around?

They should at least update the curriculum so that Filipinos will consider themselves as part of the "Austronesian race" since "Malay race" is kinda outdated.
They still teach the 3 wave hypothesis. First were the Negrito, then the Indonesians, then the Malays.

In reality, it's more like: first were the Negritos, then the Taiwanese Aborigines, and then thousands of years later there were several kingdoms from Malaysia/Indonesian that overlapped into the Philippines.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangerous-Boy View Post
See, I am most interested in this. There almost no trace of pinoy's pagan heritage. All that seems to remain after islamic influence and Spanish influence are Sanskrit words in Tagalog. Pinoy's don't even talk about the pagan past or maybe they don't even know. How much influence was from there hindu/buddhist kingdoms in southeast asia? Maybe its kind of like the same attitude when when you tell an asian muslim that their ancestors were kafirs. The closest thing i can find on the subject is:

The Indianized States of South-East Asia - George Cds - Google Books

But that focuses mostly on indonesia, malaysia, and indo-china.


What did the pinoy's even call themselves before king phillip of spain? And why would name your nationality after a european that enslaved you?

Why don't all pinoys return to paganism? it might solve all the problems between the xtians, Saracens, and communists.

As for hispanicness, the culture still seems very hispanic. Even with american colonialism, pinoys still retained spanish names instead of adopting anglo ones. Pinoy culture seems like an anomaly when comparing to the rest of asia. Even though koreans are heavily xtianized, they still retain most of their native culture. Their english sucks though.

Filipinos are very very pagan to this day. The Catholicism that is practiced is not strict Roman Catholicism. Many of the beliefs are against official church teaching. For example, many people make food offerings to dwarfs
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