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View Poll Results: Do you consider Philippine people Hispanic?
Yes 44 7.01%
Semi-Hispanic 143 22.77%
Not at all 441 70.22%
Voters: 628. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-22-2014, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
I see your point and respect your point of view. However, I have a lot of Filipino friends/family in real life. These people do not consider themselves Hispanic/Latino. I have had this conversation with many of them because I know of the Spanish history and cultural presence there, and I like being well informed about other cultures, so I ask a lot of questions! They always recognize the Spanish influence and history, but they are very proud of their pinoy culture. Why not just accept that the Philippines is a very unique place? Good for them actually that they do not speak Spanish! They got to retain their local language which is very meaningful.

It seems like there is division on this, but from my personal experience, I will respect their choices and opinions, and not fit them into a box/category that they don't relate to. the point isn't to be right, but to be respectful.

Mixed cultures and colonized cultures will always have these dilemmas. For example, there are also 100% pure Native American Mexicans who have migrated to the US and get categorized as Hispanic, even though they are not.
If you ask a Filipino from a hundred years ago if he is hispanic, for sure he will say he is.
It is quite different now. Eversince Philippines got disconnected from Spain and Latin America and started embracing English and American culture, most have been totally clueless about the origins of their culture and even most of the words that that come out of their mouths everyday. Most are totally clueless that the traditions and practices they have are also practised in Spain and Latin America like the Semana Santa practises that are not practised in all catholic countries but are only exclusive to Spain and Spanish colonies.
Another one, the wedding rituals like using Arras ( 13 coins given by the groom to the bride as a promise to take care of her and the family they are going to build ) and the Lazo that binds them together. Most Filipinos think these practises are exclusive to Filipino culture that they are totally clueless that it's also practised in Spain and Mexico. Also some of the foods that they eat like Empanadas, Flan de Leche, yemas, ensaimada to name a few.
Also, there is a stereotype that the only ones that qualifies as Hispanics are the ones from Latin America or descendants from Latin America which excludes Spanish colonies outside of the Americas which I believe is a mistake and plain ignorance because Spain also colonised countries in other continents and those countries also share the same culture and history as those countries in Latin America.

Last edited by Hermosaa; 03-22-2014 at 09:59 PM..

 
Old 03-22-2014, 09:48 PM
 
201 posts, read 265,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
If you ask a Filipino from a hundred years ago if he is hispanic, for sure he will say he is.
It depends where you ask in the Philippines. For example, if you asked a Filipino from the southern Philippines if he is hispanic, for sure he will say he isn't. Though I don't affiliate myself with Islam and its culture, I admire how its people are able to resist outside influences (i.e. colonialism) at all costs. For example, the Moros gave the Americans a very hard time and were also the last ones to defeat before the Philippine-American War ended. Another prominent example elsewhere in the world would be the Afghans repelling Soviet forces in the 1980s.

Quote:
It is quite different now. Eversince Philippines got disconnected from Spain and Latin America and started embracing English and American culture, most have been totally clueless about the origins of their culture and even most of the words that that come out of their mouths everyday.
It's just a consequence of time. The Spaniards had their "turn" of colonizing the Filipinos and forcing their Hispanic culture on them. Then the Americans came and had their "turn" (and also the Japanese for a short time during World War II). It wouldn't make sense to "accept" Spanish culture and then reject the following American culture. In other words, every colonizer will leave its "mark" on the colonized people.

Quote:
Also, there is a stereotype that the only ones that qualifies as Hispanics are the ones from Latin America or descendants from Latin America which excludes Spanish colonies outside of the Americas which I believe is a mistake because Spain also colonised in other continents and those countries also share the same culture and history as those countries in Latin America.
I think language is a big component of culture, and not enough Filipinos speak Spanish as a first language so they are considered semi-Hispanic at best.

Though most Mozambicans speak Portuguese as a first language, it seems like they would be considered semi-Hispanic too because native Bantu culture is still very much alive in that country.
 
Old 03-23-2014, 02:01 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
It depends where you ask in the Philippines. For example, if you asked a Filipino from the southern Philippines if he is hispanic, for sure he will say he isn't. Though I don't affiliate myself with Islam and its culture, I admire how its people are able to resist outside influences (i.e. colonialism) at all costs. For example, the Moros gave the Americans a very hard time and were also the last ones to defeat before the Philippine-American War ended. Another prominent example elsewhere in the world would be the Afghans repelling Soviet forces in the 1980s.

It's just a consequence of time. The Spaniards had their "turn" of colonizing the Filipinos and forcing their Hispanic culture on them. Then the Americans came and had their "turn" (and also the Japanese for a short time during World War II). It wouldn't make sense to "accept" Spanish culture and then reject the following American culture. In other words, every colonizer will leave its "mark" on the colonized people.

I think language is a big component of culture, and not enough Filipinos speak Spanish as a first language so they are considered semi-Hispanic at best.

Though most Mozambicans speak Portuguese as a first language, it seems like they would be considered semi-Hispanic too because native Bantu culture is still very much alive in that country.
The Muslims in the Philippines do not even consider themselves Filipino to begin with, as Filipinos only became Filipinos when Spain colonised it.
Anyway, in Zamboanga I think they would proudly call themselves Hispanic because they even call their city " Asia's Latin City.



Zamboanga City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Old 03-23-2014, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinai View Post
Photos from Pearl of the Orient: Discover the Old Philippines








The picture that are all boys are mostly mestizos ( 29 to be exact ) they're Filipino Spanish ? So there were really more before.
 
Old 03-23-2014, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinai View Post









More about old Philippines here
https://www.facebook.com/DiscoverOld.../photos_albums



Filipinos are still traditional even after Spanish Colonization, you'll see even in American era.

How I wish to see people still carrying 3 carabaos like this
I love those old photos and I love their Filipiniana clothes. very nostalgic.
 
Old 03-23-2014, 09:00 AM
 
83 posts, read 153,869 times
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From the Pearl of the Orient Facebook page:

Quote:
THE FAIR MESTIZAS [circa 1890's]
Photo Dimensions: 1247 x 871 pixels
----------------
"The mestizos, or half-breeds are usually the children of Chinese or Spanish fathers and native mothers, largely of the former, though the Spanish mestizos occupy the superior place in the community. The latter are generally handsome, and are more intelligent, enterprising, and energetic than the pure natives, many of them becoming wealthy merchants and attaining positions of influence.

Many of the mestiza women and girls are beautiful, with a soft olive complexion, red lips, pearly teeth, and liquid black eyes. Their hair, like that of the native women, is of a glossy black, reaching frequently to the ground. They are very proud of it, and also of their small feet, when endowed with them by nature. To enhance the seeming smallness of their feet, they often wear slippers much too small for them, and leaving one or more of the toes outside.

They are lithe and graceful in movement and are famed for their dancing. Those educated in the convent schools are trained in music and possess other accomplishments. The fair mestizas wear the native dress, the camisa, or waist, and the panuelo, or neck-kerchief, being, with those of wealth, made of the beautiful and costly piña, or pineapple silk, which is handsomely embroidered.

This dress, with the gay-colored skirt and long train, is very pretty, and is so comfortable in its adaptation to the climate that many of the European ladies wear it as a home attire. The characteristics of the Spanish mestizo soon disappear if not maintained by admixture of blood in the second or later generations."

- Charles Morris,
Our Island Empire
The Lippincot Co., Philadelphia. 1906
https://www.facebook.com/DiscoverOldPhilippines
 
Old 03-23-2014, 04:22 PM
 
3,308 posts, read 2,764,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
If you ask a Filipino from a hundred years ago if he is hispanic, for sure he will say he is.
It is quite different now. Eversince Philippines got disconnected from Spain and Latin America and started embracing English and American culture, most have been totally clueless about the origins of their culture and even most of the words that that come out of their mouths everyday. Most are totally clueless that the traditions and practices they have are also practised in Spain and Latin America like the Semana Santa practises that are not practised in all catholic countries but are only exclusive to Spain and Spanish colonies.
Another one, the wedding rituals like using Arras ( 13 coins given by the groom to the bride as a promise to take care of her and the family they are going to build ) and the Lazo that binds them together. Most Filipinos think these practises are exclusive to Filipino culture that they are totally clueless that it's also practised in Spain and Mexico. Also some of the foods that they eat like Empanadas, Flan de Leche, yemas, ensaimada to name a few.
Also, there is a stereotype that the only ones that qualifies as Hispanics are the ones from Latin America or descendants from Latin America which excludes Spanish colonies outside of the Americas which I believe is a mistake and plain ignorance because Spain also colonised countries in other continents and those countries also share the same culture and history as those countries in Latin America.
In regards to pastries, I always wonder how putos and mamones got named! Are these tagalog words, or did you incorporate them from Spanish? I always crack up when I see these, since as you may know they are bad words for us. 😮
 
Old 03-23-2014, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,437,604 times
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In those pictures I noticed that there are several pictures with women wearing traditional dresses. Some of those dresses look very similar to what some Native people in Latin America wear. It seems to be more Spanish influence instead of being purely Native. If you go to Southern Mexico, Guatemala and some Andean countries you will see very similar traditional Native clothes. I am talking about style of clothing more so than the designs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
In regards to pastries, I always wonder how putos and mamones got named! Are these tagalog words, or did you incorporate them from Spanish? I always crack up when I see these, since as you may know they are bad words for us. 😮
Ooops.
 
Old 03-23-2014, 06:38 PM
 
201 posts, read 265,012 times
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Quote:
Anyway, in Zamboanga I think they would proudly call themselves Hispanic because they even call their city " Asia's Latin City.
Well of course they would; Zamboanga was used by the Spaniards as a foothold to establish hegemony in the southern Philippines (Mindanao).

from wikipedia:
Quote:
Zamboanga was one of the main strongholds in Mindanao, supporting colonizing efforts in the south of the island and making way for Christian settlements. It also served as a military outpost, protecting the island against foreign invaders and Moro pirates. After three decades (1599), the Zamboanga fort was closed and transferred to Cebú due to great concerns about attack by the English on that island, which did not occur. After having abandoned the city, the Spaniards joined forces with Visayan troops and reached the shore of Zamboanga to bring peace to the island against Moro pirates.[13]
Zamboanga became the main headquarters of the Spaniards in June 23, 1635 upon approval of King Philip IV of Spain, and the Spanish officially founded the city.[13] Thousands of Spanish troops headed by a governor general from Spain took the approval to build the first Zamboanga fortress (now called Fort Pilar) in Zamboanga to forestall enemies in Mindanao like Moro pirates and other foreign invaders.[14] The Zamboanga fortress became the main focus of a number of battles between Moros, Chinese and Spaniards while the Spanish ruled the region from 16th to 18th centuries. While the region was already dominated by Catholicism, Muslims kept up a protracted struggle against the ruling Spaniards in the country into the 18th century.
Given its history, it's obvious why Zamboanga would be considered "Asia's Latin City." Why don't you consider a city or province that belonged to the Sultunate of Sulu, which resisted the Spanish for much longer until the late 19th century?

Perhaps its a good thing the Spanish did not totally dominate the southern Philippines, or else rich, pre-Hispanic cultural history such as Kulintang music would have been lost in the Philippines.
 
Old 03-23-2014, 08:02 PM
 
1,514 posts, read 999,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
Which parts exactly? Go to National City and Mira Mesa, for example, and you will notice that the two groups largely stick to their own kind. Yes, there are exceptions such as the ones you observed. Also note that Filipinos in SD tend to live in areas where there are not a lot of whites and (East) Asians, meaning they are more likely to have Filipinos, Mexicans, or blacks as neighbors.
Yes, it was National City (sometimes maligned as "Nasty City"). I see your point about National City Phillipinos having more contact with Mexicans as there are simply more of them around that area than east Asians.

At the same time, the Phillipines was directly helped by two nations in WWII (USA and Mexico). Though the Mexican assistance was relatively small, the Mexicans sent what they could - a few squadrons of planes. Likewise, the Phillipines were not administered from Spain. Rather, they were adminstered from Mexico.

In short, there is a historical cultural connection between the two. My guess is that Phillipinos might say have a cultural mixture that is 50 / 50 asian and hispanic? Or maybe 60% asian, 40% hispanic?
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