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Old 12-15-2009, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
597 posts, read 1,156,992 times
Reputation: 414

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Chinese export their products to the world because their low prices.
However I consider them a big waste because they have zero quality.
Their durability is very short.
And what about you? What do you think about Chinese products?
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Old 12-15-2009, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Houston
441 posts, read 1,182,824 times
Reputation: 468
Supply/demand, duh. They export because somebody is willing to pay for it. I don't think somebody is forcing you to buy it. You can buy clearly superior products from XXXX
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Old 12-15-2009, 07:17 PM
 
23 posts, read 49,319 times
Reputation: 28
100% of Chinese exporters want to raise the prices with better quality, but not acceptable to the overseas importers, they just want it cheap and continue to make big margins. I bought a China-made T-shirt in New York with $12, here in China the retail price is about $1.5. I assume the cost of a US importer is $0.5. Who make the biggest money from the T-shirt? The new york retailer, then the US importer.

A friend of mine is in wheel caster business with an American company, they produce with designs and quality requirements from the US counterparts. The casters they export can pass the most strict quality test in the US, only if the importer want it good and would pay a little higher. Profit margin of the factory used to be 20%, but was cut down to 15% last year by the importers due to bad economy, they import and simply resell it to Mexicans with 80-120% margins. Reality bites.

China made is not always of bad quality, all depends on what the market need and how much the consumers would pay. However the milk powder accident in China last year was a big shame of all Chinese people, which ruined the confidence in the industry, both abroad and home.
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Old 12-15-2009, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,791 posts, read 7,687,910 times
Reputation: 17728
After too many bad experiences with poorly made Chinese products, I would prefer to pay more for better quality made elsewhere. But I look for goods made elsewhere and can't find them. Everything is made in China. The quality ranges from ordinary to abysmal. I don't think they have to try. They have the market cornered. Some competition from elsewhere would be good, but where is that?

It also encourages a terribly wasteful attitude in consumers with people buying all sorts of useless crap just because they're cheap, and then throwing cheap goods out the minute they fail instead of fixing them.
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Old 12-15-2009, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,080 posts, read 9,941,187 times
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I've worked in the import business and I can attest to the fact that the quality of Chinese imports is rising, albeit sporadically. It all depends on the factory. There are still plenty of cheap corner-cutting sweatshops who can't follow tech packs to save their life, but there are also a growing number of respectable high-quality factories who pay fair wages and produce quality products.

The key is for businesses here to do their own inspections. You must personally fly to your supplier, speak with the workers and managers about how things have to be done and what quality you expect, and then hold them to that. Most businesses, however, go through Chinese purchasing agent middlemen. Some are honest, but the majority are not. The really sad thing is that the Chinese are cutting dangerous corners to save a very tiny % of the product's total value when a little better communication (or bargaining) could see them paid to produce quality goods.

In my experience, however, the Chinese are--surprisingly--not the world's best bargainers. They have a tendency to circumvent the system or give up too easily rather than stand up and bargain hard for fair exchange. Indians, Malaysians, Vietnamese, and especially Cambodians are much better at bargaining and haggling.

Cheap production is shifting away from China to Vietnam and Cambodia as wages and working conditions improve in China. Be sure to check the label or tag on your next purchase before you go assuming that everything (cheap) is still Made In China.

Some people fail to recognize that Asia is extremely dynamic and conditions are changing rapidly. I still overhear people talking about "Made In Taiwan" in a derogatory manner when the truth is that Taiwanese goods are now nearly on par with Japanese and American manufacturing. So if you happen to buy a shirt or piece of electronics with "Made In Taiwan" stamped on it, you've likely found yourself some quality craftsmanship.

After saying all this, I would caution anyone buying Chinese products not to use them in any health-related applications. Regulation in China, despite--or perhaps because of the Communist government--is abysmal with massive corruption at all levels of the barely-functioning regulatory structure.
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Old 12-15-2009, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,080 posts, read 9,941,187 times
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I would hardly say quality is assured, but things are certainly improving.

Last edited by Cornerguy1; 12-15-2009 at 09:50 PM.. Reason: orphaned material removed
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Old 12-15-2009, 10:23 PM
 
2,542 posts, read 3,621,605 times
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Never found anything that was "made in china" to be anything but junk!
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Old 12-15-2009, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,791 posts, read 7,687,910 times
Reputation: 17728
Thanks for that, sponger42. I was thinking myself that it may be a similar situation like the "olden days" when Made in Japan was a label meaning "crap made". How far they've come since then! Hopefully, Chinese-made goods will also improve in quality. I still don't like that Western countries are giving away all their manufacturing industries though.

And yes, I wouldn't use any health related products out of China, and definitely not any food either.
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Old 12-16-2009, 08:22 AM
 
12,693 posts, read 14,074,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
Thanks for that, sponger42. I was thinking myself that it may be a similar situation like the "olden days" when Made in Japan was a label meaning "crap made". How far they've come since then! Hopefully, Chinese-made goods will also improve in quality. I still don't like that Western countries are giving away all their manufacturing industries though....
I can remember the era of products stamped "Made in Occupied Japan." They were mostly very cheap decorative items and toys, and they were - and looked - cheesy. These were superseded by the wave of "Made in Japan" items - a far wider array of products, and of better quality. And, as they say, the rest is history.

One of the industries that the U.S. gave away was home electronic...but the Japanese products, and now other Asian ones, were superb.

I would fully expect that China will repeat the scenario.

My concern is what is the U.S. going to be exporting to make up for all that it imports in the way of consumer good?

If China is the new U.S., then perhaps the U.S. will become the old China - low paid workers producing low quality products for quick sale.
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Old 12-16-2009, 01:34 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,178 posts, read 4,845,815 times
Reputation: 1242
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRAZILIAN View Post
Chinese export their products to the world because their low prices.
However I consider them a big waste because they have zero quality.
Their durability is very short.
And what about you? What do you think about Chinese products?
It's becoming a moot point. China practically owns the United States now.

Once upon a time, our cheap products came from Japan. Then things changed for the better for Japan & our things started to come from elsewhere. Now it seems all or most of our cheaply made things come from China.

China wisely loaned our country so much money that we can probably never repay them...

I recommend making a mental adjustment & learning Mandarin to the best of one's ability. Make an adjustment to the trade of Quality for... convenience for our "supplier" of all our country has led us to believe we need. Our country's financial people traded our security & quality of life for... cr*p.

It'll probably be a feudal system lifestyle in 20 years time.
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