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Old 11-15-2010, 04:52 PM
 
1,498 posts, read 2,547,779 times
Reputation: 550

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Well obviously they had to do something, since being a liberal propaganda ragsheet wasn't working out to well for them:

Atlanta Journal Constitution is losing $1 million a week

I like their new style. It seems pretty fair and balanced, which is what people want. refusing to endorse political candidates was a good decision. No body wants a socialist newspaper, but no body would want an psycho-conservative one either (if that actually existed...). Its nice to hear both sides. They also did a great job uncovering the thuggery going on at Atlanta Public Schools. I did find some of the comments in one of the street car articles a bit ridiculous though:

"Brown said the streetcar will eliminate the hassle of getting around the community and make it easier for businesses to see the area's potential. Her caution, however, is that it's critical to keep the area's character as a black business mecca. Like Little Five Points, which is a destination because of its alternative appeal, she said Sweet Auburn should not look like a mall."

How inclusive of her. Its more important to keep the businesses black owned then attracting business in general.

As for their move to Perimeter, who cares? That's been a long time coming. Does anybody besides the government still have offices in that part of downtown?
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Old 11-15-2010, 04:59 PM
 
876 posts, read 1,885,834 times
Reputation: 259
Newsboy wrote:
Quote:
The entire staff (what's left of it) moved to two floors in Cox's corporate HQ in Dunwoody last spring. There is no downtown "bureau." When reporters in the city need desk space, they go to WSB where there's a cubicle assigned to them. That's it.
So they are in the Dunwoody digs then. Where is the other Cox major office? Is it in Sandy Springs or Roswell? Just curious. I have seen it driving by in the recent past.

Anyway, newspapers are money losers I don't know about the politics of executives at Cox, but they want to cut costs where they can. Newspapers have been in decline for at least a decade now, just in the past few years, does it appear very obvious with the downturn of the economy. The Internet has replaced many of the needs of print media.

Older people and those who do not use the Internet tend to be AJC subscribers along with people who have done so as habit for many years, but just as with most other print newspapers, circulation has been way down for years. This fact doesn't matter if the paper is liberal, libertarian, or librarian in its political outlook.
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Old 11-15-2010, 05:49 PM
 
155 posts, read 238,136 times
Reputation: 145
Do people still read the AJC ? They've merged with the Journal, downsized , downsized some more, offered early retirement, and downsized yet more. Biased reporting was what led me to abandon this paper. And local news was filtered to omit negative news about Atlanta institutions like Coke and Emory - except when to do so would be impossible (i.e. other newspapers and news services reported on them). Even the best newspapers in the country are facing tough times so how could something like the AJC have a bright future at this point ?
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:02 PM
 
7,113 posts, read 8,126,575 times
Reputation: 1777
I'm worried about the loss of in-depth reporting. The local TV stations give superficial coverage that's over in a few minutes. Not only do I not watch the news; I don't watch television in general. And radio is no help as talk-radio is mostly opinion for entertainment's sake. The AJC was decent in its Atlanta reporting but it is going superficial too. ABC seems to be the best source for now.

The internet is killing papers as places like craigslist are robbing them of revenue so it's not like newspapers can sell classifieds on the web. They tried subscription based but there's too much free stuff out there. Some have predicted an eventual falling away and consolidation of web news services as the "pie" can only be divided in just so many pieces. People are overwhelmed by the number of sites fighting for their attention. Maybe the AJC should soon shut down printing and go on-line. Merge with WSB and offer a single website.

I don't know what is the mood of the public these days. The internet has been a blessing in allowing any person a say but it has also made us a bit superficial. We don't spend much time understanding a topic to a deep level. I'm as guilty as anyone in googling for a fast answer and when I have it...I move on.
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 11,780,088 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post

Thanks for posting this arjay57, and I absolutely agree with every single thing Maria (who I LOVE) wrote on her blog.

Can any of you think of another single major city daily that has decamped for the suburbs of its core city? I can't.

I know that all newspapers are in trouble. One of my favorites, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer actually ceased publication last year, and is now only available online. I think the AJC will probably be next, and they only have their whack-job of an Editor to blame for this.

The dumbing-down of the paper in the last 10 or so years has been nothing short of spectacular. I can't honestly think of another major metro that has such a huge portion of its news filtered through one conglomerate (Cox) the way we do, what with the AJC, WSB TV and WSB AM & FM dominating this market. Not a good thing at all, and they are beyond devisive for the region in their coverage (or lack thereof) and opinions.
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Old 11-15-2010, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 11,780,088 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
I did find some of the comments in one of the street car articles a bit ridiculous though:

"Brown said the streetcar will eliminate the hassle of getting around the community and make it easier for businesses to see the area's potential. Her caution, however, is that it's critical to keep the area's character as a black business mecca. Like Little Five Points, which is a destination because of its alternative appeal, she said Sweet Auburn should not look like a mall."

How inclusive of her. Its more important to keep the businesses black owned then attracting business in general.
And? Auburn Avenue has a history of being the black business mecca of the entire Southeast. There's a reason it used to be known as the "Black Wall Street" back in the day. There is absolutely nothing wrong with holding onto that history, and the new businesses that are flourishing there are certainly inclusive to all - such as the extremely popular (and white owned) Sound Table, among other businesses that have a very diverse mix of patrons. This is THE new emerging club district, and everyone is welcome there. At the same time, it's never a good idea to erase history, and I personally agree that it should "not look like a mall." It seems as if you are looking for racism where it doesn't exist, in my humble opinion.

Quote:
As for their move to Perimeter, who cares? That's been a long time coming. Does anybody besides the government still have offices in that part of downtown?
Uh, ever heard of a couple of small institutions like The State Bar of Georgia and Time-Warner, to name just two?
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Old 11-15-2010, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,118,630 times
Reputation: 2162
I actually think that the internet is good thing. It democratizes to a certain degree access to information. So many Corporations in the past have been able to get away with bloody murder because it's so hard to get any info on their shenanigans in a timely and easy to read manner.

The problem I think is that maybe people have too much choice, perhaps? I wonder how well the human mind is capable of taking in & sorting out so much data.

There are literally hundreds & thousands of websites one can go to for information be it objective or subjective. No longer is a person held hostage to a singular medium for instantaneous knowledge like in the past.

Honestly I wouldn't consider any mainstream media organization as a good info source, not even ABC (case in point: lack of aggressive reporting on the reasons for the current war in Iraq). Each forum has its own bias, so what I do is read the same topic in as many different media perspectives as possible & ultimately piece together an opinion that I can live with.

But I do have to say though that at least for the younger generation, the internet has made people less sociable. I notice more and more that people lack even the most basic of common graces, like saying hello to a stranger or maintaining good eye contact. I feel that a society is in danger when men & women can't even talk to each other on a basic human level without some sort of fear/paranoia based reaction involved.

Just my thoughts on the matter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
I'm worried about the loss of in-depth reporting. The local TV stations give superficial coverage that's over in a few minutes. Not only do I not watch the news; I don't watch television in general. And radio is no help as talk-radio is mostly opinion for entertainment's sake. The AJC was decent in its Atlanta reporting but it is going superficial too. ABC seems to be the best source for now.

The internet is killing papers as places like craigslist are robbing them of revenue so it's not like newspapers can sell classifieds on the web. They tried subscription based but there's too much free stuff out there. Some have predicted an eventual falling away and consolidation of web news services as the "pie" can only be divided in just so many pieces. People are overwhelmed by the number of sites fighting for their attention. Maybe the AJC should soon shut down printing and go on-line. Merge with WSB and offer a single website.

I don't know what is the mood of the public these days. The internet has been a blessing in allowing any person a say but it has also made us a bit superficial. We don't spend much time understanding a topic to a deep level. I'm as guilty as anyone in googling for a fast answer and when I have it...I move on.
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Old 11-15-2010, 08:39 PM
 
28,151 posts, read 24,696,070 times
Reputation: 9549
Daily newspapers have played an enormous role in shaping American cities. They are the record and the voice of the community. Even more importantly, they are its watchdog and its conscience. Too liberal for some? Sure, but that's the nature of almost every great reporting enterprise. If you're simply going to be the voice of reaction and the status quo, who really gives a hoot?

The AJC represents one of Atlanta's proudest traditions, and I think the loss of that is what Maria Saporta is really grieving for. In times when other Southern cities were mired in hate, backwardness and violence, the AJC exhorted us to rise above. Its editors and columnists told us we could be bigger and better than that. Don't be Birmingham, don't be Mississippi.

And don't be small-minded! Sure, the Crackers at Ponce de Leon ballpark were fun, but Atlanta charted a destiny that took it beyond other Southern cities. We were going for the big leagues, and danged if we didn't make it. We needed our own subway, like those big cities up north. Our own pro sports teams, so we could duke it out in the World Series and the Superbowl. We wanted our own cable network, the world's biggest airport, and the tallest building outside of New York and Chicago. Nobody believed a little Southern town could do that, but the AJC said, "Oh, yeah, just watch us!" If you grew up here, you understand the utterly transformative role the AJC has played.

Of course the AJC has always chronicled Atlanta's unique character as well. Furman Bisher, Hugh Park, Celestine Sibley, Lewis Grizzard, Cliff Baldowski, Charles Seabrook and countless others who told us every day what was on their minds and those of our fellow citizens. You may not agree with Cynthia Tucker but she knows how to write a column that makes people squirm. The internet is great for a quick read, but there is nothing like having the newspaper in your hands and sitting down with a good cup of coffee. Or picking up the sports section left lying in the chair while you're waiting for a haircut. Or delighting in the curiosities of the want ads, or sharing the comics with your kids or working the crossword on Sunday morning.

All of those things and more are what goes away when you lose your daily paper.

So yeah, I've got my beefs with the AJC. It hasn't always hit the mark, and sometimes it veered way off target. But I'd sure rather have it than not. For well over a century it has been the persistent, quirky, sometimes timid but occasionally bold, brilliant and inspiring voice of Atlanta. We're not the same place without it.
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Old 11-15-2010, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 11,780,088 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Daily newspapers have played an enormous role in shaping American cities. They are the record and the voice of the community. Even more importantly, they are its watchdog and its conscience. Too liberal for some? Sure, but that's the nature of almost every great reporting enterprise. If you're simply going to be the voice of reaction and the status quo, who really gives a hoot?

The AJC represents one of Atlanta's proudest traditions, and I think the loss of that is what Maria Saporta is really grieving for. In times when other Southern cities were mired in hate, backwardness and violence, the AJC exhorted us to rise above. Its editors and columnists told us we could be bigger and better than that. Don't be Birmingham, don't be Mississippi.

And don't be small-minded! Sure, the Crackers at Ponce de Leon ballpark were fun, but Atlanta charted a destiny that took it beyond other Southern cities. We were going for the big leagues, and danged if we didn't make it. We needed our own subway, like those big cities up north. Our own pro sports teams, so we could duke it out in the World Series and the Superbowl. We wanted our own cable network, the world's biggest airport, and the tallest building outside of New York and Chicago. Nobody believed a little Southern town could do that, but the AJC said, "Oh, yeah, just watch us!" If you grew up here, you understand the utterly transformative role the AJC has played.

Of course the AJC has always chronicled Atlanta's unique character as well. Furman Bisher, Hugh Park, Celestine Sibley, Lewis Grizzard, Cliff Baldowski, Charles Seabrook and countless others who told us every day what was on their minds and those of our fellow citizens. You may not agree with Cynthia Tucker but she knows how to write a column that makes people squirm. The internet is great for a quick read, but there is nothing like having the newspaper in your hands and sitting down with a good cup of coffee. Or picking up the sports section left lying in the chair while you're waiting for a haircut. Or delighting in the curiosities of the want ads, or sharing the comics with your kids or working the crossword on Sunday morning.

All of those things and more are what goes away when you lose your daily paper.

So yeah, I've got my beefs with the AJC. It hasn't always hit the mark, and sometimes it veered way off target. But I'd sure rather have it than not. For well over a century it has been the persistent, quirky, sometimes timid but occasionally bold, brilliant and inspiring voice of Atlanta. We're not the same place without it.


Absolutely excellent post!
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Old 11-15-2010, 08:47 PM
 
12,928 posts, read 21,014,421 times
Reputation: 4088
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
And? Auburn Avenue has a history of being the black business mecca of the entire Southeast. There's a reason it used to be known as the "Black Wall Street" back in the day. There is absolutely nothing wrong with holding onto that history, and the new businesses that are flourishing there are certainly inclusive to all - such as the extremely popular (and white owned) Sound Table, among other businesses that have a very diverse mix of patrons. This is THE new emerging club district, and everyone is welcome there. At the same time, it's never a good idea to erase history, and I personally agree that it should "not look like a mall." It seems as if you are looking for racism where it doesn't exist, in my humble opinion.



Uh, ever heard of a couple of small institutions like The State Bar of Georgia and Time-Warner, to name just two?

This, this, and this.
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