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Old 11-15-2010, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,122,478 times
Reputation: 2162

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It seems that the way of all American/Western companies & corporations is through monopoly. Maybe that's a function of our human need for services, technology, and media that conforms to our narrow points of view and bias systems.

Wired Magazine wrote an excellant article on the consolidating of the internet media & why it's happening. If you have any time to spare, give it a read.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
I can't honestly think of another major metro that has such a huge portion of its news filtered through one conglomerate (Cox) the way we do, what with the AJC, WSB TV and WSB AM & FM dominating this market. Not a good thing at all, and they are beyond devisive for the region in their coverage (or lack thereof) and opinions.
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Old 11-15-2010, 08:49 PM
 
12,948 posts, read 21,050,130 times
Reputation: 4101
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Daily newspapers have played an enormous role in shaping American cities. They are the record and the voice of the community. Even more importantly, they are its watchdog and its conscience. Too liberal for some? Sure, but that's the nature of almost every great reporting enterprise. If you're simply going to be the voice of reaction and the status quo, who really gives a hoot?

The AJC represents one of Atlanta's proudest traditions, and I think the loss of that is what Maria Saporta is really grieving for. In times when other Southern cities were mired in hate, backwardness and violence, the AJC exhorted us to rise above. Its editors and columnists told us we could be bigger and better than that. Don't be Birmingham, don't be Mississippi.

And don't be small-minded! Sure, the Crackers at Ponce de Leon ballpark were fun, but Atlanta charted a destiny that took it beyond other Southern cities. We were going for the big leagues, and danged if we didn't make it. We needed our own subway, like those big cities up north. Our own pro sports teams, so we could duke it out in the World Series and the Superbowl. We wanted our own cable network, the world's biggest airport, and the tallest building outside of New York and Chicago. Nobody believed a little Southern town could do that, but the AJC said, "Oh, yeah, just watch us!" If you grew up here, you understand the utterly transformative role the AJC has played.

Of course the AJC has always chronicled Atlanta's unique character as well. Furman Bisher, Hugh Park, Celestine Sibley, Lewis Grizzard, Cliff Baldowski, Charles Seabrook and countless others who told us every day what was on their minds and those of our fellow citizens. You may not agree with Cynthia Tucker but she knows how to write a column that makes people squirm. The internet is great for a quick read, but there is nothing like having the newspaper in your hands and sitting down with a good cup of coffee. Or picking up the sports section left lying in the chair while you're waiting for a haircut. Or delighting in the curiosities of the want ads, or sharing the comics with your kids or working the crossword on Sunday morning.

All of those things and more are what goes away when you lose your daily paper.

So yeah, I've got my beefs with the AJC. It hasn't always hit the mark, and sometimes it veered way off target. But I'd sure rather have it than not. For well over a century it has been the persistent, quirky, sometimes timid but occasionally bold, brilliant and inspiring voice of Atlanta. We're not the same place without it.

And this, this, and this as well!
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Old 11-15-2010, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,122,478 times
Reputation: 2162
Yes!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
daily newspapers have played an enormous role in shaping american cities. They are the record and the voice of the community. Even more importantly, they are its watchdog and its conscience. Too liberal for some? Sure, but that's the nature of almost every great reporting enterprise. If you're simply going to be the voice of reaction and the status quo, who really gives a hoot?

The ajc represents one of atlanta's proudest traditions, and i think the loss of that is what maria saporta is really grieving for. In times when other southern cities were mired in hate, backwardness and violence, the ajc exhorted us to rise above. Its editors and columnists told us we could be bigger and better than that. Don't be birmingham, don't be mississippi.

And don't be small-minded! Sure, the crackers at ponce de leon ballpark were fun, but atlanta charted a destiny that took it beyond other southern cities. We were going for the big leagues, and danged if we didn't make it. We needed our own subway, like those big cities up north. Our own pro sports teams, so we could duke it out in the world series and the superbowl. We wanted our own cable network, the world's biggest airport, and the tallest building outside of new york and chicago. Nobody believed a little southern town could do that, but the ajc said, "oh, yeah, just watch us!" if you grew up here, you understand the utterly transformative role the ajc has played.

Of course the ajc has always chronicled atlanta's unique character as well. Furman bisher, hugh park, celestine sibley, lewis grizzard, cliff baldowski, charles seabrook and countless others who told us every day what was on their minds and those of our fellow citizens. You may not agree with cynthia tucker but she knows how to write a column that makes people squirm. The internet is great for a quick read, but there is nothing like having the newspaper in your hands and sitting down with a good cup of coffee. Or picking up the sports section left lying in the chair while you're waiting for a haircut. Or delighting in the curiosities of the want ads, or sharing the comics with your kids or working the crossword on sunday morning.

All of those things and more are what goes away when you lose your daily paper.

So yeah, i've got my beefs with the ajc. It hasn't always hit the mark, and sometimes it veered way off target. But i'd sure rather have it than not. For well over a century it has been the persistent, quirky, sometimes timid but occasionally bold, brilliant and inspiring voice of atlanta. We're not the same place without it.
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Old 11-15-2010, 10:07 PM
 
Location: International Spacestation
5,207 posts, read 5,978,713 times
Reputation: 1415
lol this topic is interesting lol.
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Old 11-15-2010, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,163 posts, read 15,988,005 times
Reputation: 9182
THANK YOU ARJAY ... for making me cry. Seriously! And I'm sure, the tears are being shared in Heaven ...

http://www.itsourturn.us/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/margaret-mitchell2.jpg (broken link)


Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Daily newspapers have played an enormous role in shaping American cities. They are the record and the voice of the community. Even more importantly, they are its watchdog and its conscience. Too liberal for some? Sure, but that's the nature of almost every great reporting enterprise. If you're simply going to be the voice of reaction and the status quo, who really gives a hoot?

The AJC represents one of Atlanta's proudest traditions, and I think the loss of that is what Maria Saporta is really grieving for. In times when other Southern cities were mired in hate, backwardness and violence, the AJC exhorted us to rise above. Its editors and columnists told us we could be bigger and better than that. Don't be Birmingham, don't be Mississippi.

And don't be small-minded! Sure, the Crackers at Ponce de Leon ballpark were fun, but Atlanta charted a destiny that took it beyond other Southern cities. We were going for the big leagues, and danged if we didn't make it. We needed our own subway, like those big cities up north. Our own pro sports teams, so we could duke it out in the World Series and the Superbowl. We wanted our own cable network, the world's biggest airport, and the tallest building outside of New York and Chicago. Nobody believed a little Southern town could do that, but the AJC said, "Oh, yeah, just watch us!" If you grew up here, you understand the utterly transformative role the AJC has played.

Of course the AJC has always chronicled Atlanta's unique character as well. Furman Bisher, Hugh Park, Celestine Sibley, Lewis Grizzard, Cliff Baldowski, Charles Seabrook and countless others who told us every day what was on their minds and those of our fellow citizens. You may not agree with Cynthia Tucker but she knows how to write a column that makes people squirm. The internet is great for a quick read, but there is nothing like having the newspaper in your hands and sitting down with a good cup of coffee. Or picking up the sports section left lying in the chair while you're waiting for a haircut. Or delighting in the curiosities of the want ads, or sharing the comics with your kids or working the crossword on Sunday morning.

All of those things and more are what goes away when you lose your daily paper.

So yeah, I've got my beefs with the AJC. It hasn't always hit the mark, and sometimes it veered way off target. But I'd sure rather have it than not. For well over a century it has been the persistent, quirky, sometimes timid but occasionally bold, brilliant and inspiring voice of Atlanta. We're not the same place without it.
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Old 11-15-2010, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 11,792,175 times
Reputation: 2774
^Oh, wow! Thanks for the wonderful pics.

Sigh.......
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Old 11-15-2010, 10:44 PM
 
248 posts, read 544,607 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Daily newspapers have played an enormous role in shaping American cities. They are the record and the voice of the community. Even more importantly, they are its watchdog and its conscience. Too liberal for some? Sure, but that's the nature of almost every great reporting enterprise. If you're simply going to be the voice of reaction and the status quo, who really gives a hoot?

The AJC represents one of Atlanta's proudest traditions, and I think the loss of that is what Maria Saporta is really grieving for. In times when other Southern cities were mired in hate, backwardness and violence, the AJC exhorted us to rise above. Its editors and columnists told us we could be bigger and better than that. Don't be Birmingham, don't be Mississippi.

And don't be small-minded! Sure, the Crackers at Ponce de Leon ballpark were fun, but Atlanta charted a destiny that took it beyond other Southern cities. We were going for the big leagues, and danged if we didn't make it. We needed our own subway, like those big cities up north. Our own pro sports teams, so we could duke it out in the World Series and the Superbowl. We wanted our own cable network, the world's biggest airport, and the tallest building outside of New York and Chicago. Nobody believed a little Southern town could do that, but the AJC said, "Oh, yeah, just watch us!" If you grew up here, you understand the utterly transformative role the AJC has played.

Of course the AJC has always chronicled Atlanta's unique character as well. Furman Bisher, Hugh Park, Celestine Sibley, Lewis Grizzard, Cliff Baldowski, Charles Seabrook and countless others who told us every day what was on their minds and those of our fellow citizens. You may not agree with Cynthia Tucker but she knows how to write a column that makes people squirm. The internet is great for a quick read, but there is nothing like having the newspaper in your hands and sitting down with a good cup of coffee. Or picking up the sports section left lying in the chair while you're waiting for a haircut. Or delighting in the curiosities of the want ads, or sharing the comics with your kids or working the crossword on Sunday morning.

All of those things and more are what goes away when you lose your daily paper.

So yeah, I've got my beefs with the AJC. It hasn't always hit the mark, and sometimes it veered way off target. But I'd sure rather have it than not. For well over a century it has been the persistent, quirky, sometimes timid but occasionally bold, brilliant and inspiring voice of Atlanta. We're not the same place without it.
Dude, seriously -- you should submit this to the AJC op-ed page. Awesome.

I think Maria is making a great point that, instead of working overtime to appeal to the wider spectrum of the northern metro area -- an area that already has it's own local news publications (as a former staff writer at the Marietta Daily Journal, I outta know) -- the AJC has an obligation to be a great news source for the city of Atlanta. They can be inclusive of the metro without brazenly turning their back on Atlanta and catering to anti-urban sentiment.
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Old 11-15-2010, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,936,601 times
Reputation: 3853
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Daily newspapers have played an enormous role in shaping American cities. They are the record and the voice of the community. Even more importantly, they are its watchdog and its conscience.
Much of that hasn't been true in most cities for years, however, as more and more newspapers are purchased by giant media companies and generally spew top stories from the major news bureaus instead of writing their own.

Yes, you see local sports and sometimes editorial coverage from those papers, but they are no longer unique sources for that information.

Quite frankly, my own personal interest in local newspapers was lost when it became apparent to be that they were too stupid to realize the potential of the net, and when it became clear to me that I could obtain much of the very same content from other sites without having to deal with piles of waste paper and childish threats from local companies about creating paywalls. That demonstrates a major lack of understanding on their part.

Record companies are going through the same process and for the same reason ... they've changed the nature of much their product to fit the lowest common denominator in far too many ways in the name of the almighty dollar, and I'd rather have fun finding original content on my own.

Bye bye big media...
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Old 11-15-2010, 11:33 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
7,803 posts, read 11,759,530 times
Reputation: 5408
I think the best point everyone has made about what the AJC is now and what it was is the move from being columnist/report focused and not. Specifically, this is more of a culture change that popped up in the merger of the Journal and the Constitution. While Cox has owned both since 1950, it wasn't until 2001 when the paper truly became one and they stopped producing separate papers (something some of the whipper snappers on this thread might not know )

While this might not seem like much, the newsrooms and the editorial staff couldn't be more different from each other. The Journal was always more conservative both politically and for efforts in the way the city should be shaped, while the Constitution was more progressive both politically and in it's advocacy. In fact, I think it could be argued that the Constitution was one of the driving forces for Atlanta becoming the city it is today. Consider the following:

-Constitution was once ran by Henry Grady, the main advocate of the idea of the "New South", among other things.
-Under the leadership of Ralph McGill, the Constitution was one of the few newspapers (and largest) in the South advocating for desegregation
-Then there are the award winning columnists and reporters such as Lewis Grizzard, Celestine Sibley, Doug Marlette, Mike Luckovich, Cynthia Tucker, and even Maria Saporta to name just a few.

The last point is the most salient as from what I understand, when the full merger happened in 2001, the Journal's editorial staff took over and the reporters from the Constitution took a back seat.

We once had a great paper in this city, but it really put journalism on the back burner over the last decade. I guess it is a little comforting to know that this is a phenomena that has been occurring with pretty every major daily nationwide. They all seem to have not adjusted well to the shift to the web being the preferred news source of most people.
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Old 11-16-2010, 01:35 AM
 
1,498 posts, read 2,550,446 times
Reputation: 550
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
And? Auburn Avenue has a history of being the black business mecca of the entire Southeast. There's a reason it used to be known as the "Black Wall Street" back in the day. There is absolutely nothing wrong with holding onto that history, and the new businesses that are flourishing there are certainly inclusive to all - such as the extremely popular (and white owned) Sound Table, among other businesses that have a very diverse mix of patrons. This is THE new emerging club district, and everyone is welcome there. At the same time, it's never a good idea to erase history, and I personally agree that it should "not look like a mall." It seems as if you are looking for racism where it doesn't exist, in my humble opinion.



Uh, ever heard of a couple of small institutions like The State Bar of Georgia and Time-Warner, to name just two?
And how exactly should we hold onto that history? Ban white businesses from opening up in the neighborhood?

Auburn Ave. has history... but that doesn't mean the neighborhood must stay black forever. In a free market system, there are no rules when it comes to demographics, which can alter a neighborhood beyond recognition in less than a decade. If white businesses want to move to Sweet Auburn, they should be welcomed with open arms. There shouldn't be any underlying animosity by the original businesses and people like you that whitey is taking over the neighborhood. Economic development is economic development, no matter what color it is.

Sweet Auburn will turn white quickly, mostly due to its architectural assets. Unlike the rest of downtown, Sweet Auburn was skipped in the 60s building boom that ridded the rest of downtown of its historical buildings. Sweet Auburn buildings have a character and charm that is hard to duplicate, and therefore is very valuable. The street car will only speed up the process.

Last edited by BringBackCobain; 11-16-2010 at 02:29 AM..
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