U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-04-2010, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Lakewood Ranch, FL
5,148 posts, read 7,728,457 times
Reputation: 6058

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
The non-Christians can deal with it. The U.S. is a majority-Christian country, and if they don't like it, they can move. We should force these people to live in Saudi Arabia or Iran - it would really put things in perspective for them.

No doubt the people complaining are the hyper-secular liberal atheists who are disgusted by any trace of Christianity, regardless of whether it's a graduation ceremony or a Christmas tree in the office lobby. Their ultimate goal is to sever the link between Western society and Christianity by completely erasing it from the public realm.
Speaking as a Christian, I have to say that your attitude doesn't reflect a very Christian approach to the question. Perhaps you might reflect on what it means to turn the other cheek.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-04-2010, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Acworth
1,352 posts, read 3,788,157 times
Reputation: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbronston View Post
Speaking as a Christian, I have to say that your attitude doesn't reflect a very Christian approach to the question. Perhaps you might reflect on what it means to turn the other cheek.



Perhaps you need to read up on the historical religious references... Hmmm.. say 1200, 1300s... 800s...

these are right off the top of my head. turn the other cheek suddenly becomes smack the other cheek, doesn't it
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2010, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,844 posts, read 14,583,496 times
Reputation: 3484
Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
The non-Christians can deal with it. The U.S. is a majority-Christian country, and if they don't like it, they can move. We should force these people to live in Saudi Arabia or Iran - it would really put things in perspective for them.

No doubt the people complaining are the hyper-secular liberal atheists who are disgusted by any trace of Christianity, regardless of whether it's a graduation ceremony or a Christmas tree in the office lobby. Their ultimate goal is to sever the link between Western society and Christianity by completely erasing it from the public realm.
lt's comments like your that provide the fodder for liberals when they want to portray conservatives as extreme. You need to try reading the US Constitution, and specifically the Bill of Rights.

What makes this country great is that it was founded by people escaping religious persecution and they took steps to ensure that gov't would stay out of the religion business. Public schools shouldn't be promoting religion of one type or another. As I said, i don't think this situation rises to that level.

As far as leaving the country if I as a non-Christian don't agree with bible thumpers whose whole life revolves around religion and are oblivious to those aho believe differently, i can only thank our founding fathers for being as wise as they were and protecting us from such people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2010, 06:02 PM
 
1,498 posts, read 2,558,027 times
Reputation: 550
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbronston View Post
Speaking as a Christian, I have to say that your attitude doesn't reflect a very Christian approach to the question. Perhaps you might reflect on what it means to turn the other cheek.
Turning the other cheek and giving into these demands could eventually result in the end of our civilization. I know that sounds dramatic, but do some reading on Antonio Gramsci, an Italian communist. He argued the only way communism would be embraced in the West was by undermining and destroying Western society's foundation, Christianity. This in turn required a "long march though the institutions" where anti-capitalists gain a dominant voice in media, academia, the arts, and other mass institutions. From there, they subvert Christianity under a banner of multi-culturalism and extreme separation of church and state.

Europe in 30 years is a good example for what this can result in. They have successfully erased Christianity from society, causing a destruction of the family and sub-replacement fertility. As the European population and Christianity declines, the Muslim population rises and Islam fills the spiritual void.

Which is why these complainers need to be sent to Iran. I doubt they would be complaining if they experienced life in a society based on the alternative.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2010, 06:21 PM
 
1,498 posts, read 2,558,027 times
Reputation: 550
Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
lt's comments like your that provide the fodder for liberals when they want to portray conservatives as extreme. You need to try reading the US Constitution, and specifically the Bill of Rights.

What makes this country great is that it was founded by people escaping religious persecution and they took steps to ensure that gov't would stay out of the religion business. Public schools shouldn't be promoting religion of one type or another. As I said, i don't think this situation rises to that level.

As far as leaving the country if I as a non-Christian don't agree with bible thumpers whose whole life revolves around religion and are oblivious to those aho believe differently, i can only thank our founding fathers for being as wise as they were and protecting us from such people.
I have read the entire constitution and the bill of rights. I wouldn't have passed Constitutional Law if I hadn't. I don't agree with those who try to force their religion on others, and have had much experience with that as a Catholic living in the bible belt.

I also don't agree with public schools or government promoting religion. What I have a problem with is people using separation of church and state as a proxy for purging Christianity from society in general or converting others to atheism. And it's really not an atheist thing. Some of my best friends are atheist. However, they still recognize that Christianity plays a beneficial role in our society. They aren't bothered by public displays of it and do not look down upon Christians.

Since you yourself are an atheist, I am sure you understand there is a difference between an atheist who may not believe in Christianity but respects its role as the foundation of our society and those atheists who are disgusted by Christianity and want it extinguished. The latter group is one who the founding fathers were also worried about - they recognized that religious persecution can be carried out by non-religious people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2010, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,844 posts, read 14,583,496 times
Reputation: 3484
Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
I have read the entire constitution and the bill of rights. I wouldn't have passed Constitutional Law if I hadn't. I don't agree with those who try to force their religion on others, and have had much experience with that as a Catholic living in the bible belt.

I also don't agree with public schools or government promoting religion. What I have a problem with is people using separation of church and state as a proxy for purging Christianity from society in general or converting others to atheism. And it's really not an atheist thing. Some of my best friends are atheist. However, they still recognize that Christianity plays a beneficial role in our society. They aren't bothered by public displays of it and do not look down upon Christians.

Since you yourself are an atheist, I am sure you understand there is a difference between an atheist who may not believe in Christianity but respects its role as the foundation of our society and those atheists who are disgusted by Christianity and would prefer for it to be extinguished.
Interesting that you say you're a constitutional lawyer, yet you espouse the views you do. Not sure where you went to school, but let us know so I can be sure to send my kids elsewhere.

The fundamental and guiding principle of our founding fathers, through their private writings and their imprint on our nation is that we err on the side of caution to protect the rights of the minority. It's simple to protect the majority. What you espouse in your comments that the country is a majority Christian country, therefore non-Christians can take it or leave it is exactly NOT what the constitution has in mind.

Religion or lack thereof is a personal thing. The problem is those people who feel compelled to wear religion on their sleeve. This situation in Cherokee doesn't rise to that level, but frankly I see no need for an Xmas tree, menorah, Kwanzaa symbol or anything else put up by the gov't.

Why can't the gov't just stay secular and let religion be a personal and private matter? Why do people feel it necessary to constantly put religion in our faces?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2010, 07:29 PM
 
1,498 posts, read 2,558,027 times
Reputation: 550
Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
Interesting that you say you're a constitutional lawyer, yet you espouse the views you do. Not sure where you went to school, but let us know so I can be sure to send my kids elsewhere.

The fundamental and guiding principle of our founding fathers, through their private writings and their imprint on our nation is that we err on the side of caution to protect the rights of the minority. It's simple to protect the majority. What you espouse in your comments that the country is a majority Christian country, therefore non-Christians can take it or leave it is exactly NOT what the constitution has in mind.

Religion or lack thereof is a personal thing. The problem is those people who feel compelled to wear religion on their sleeve. This situation in Cherokee doesn't rise to that level, but frankly I see no need for an Xmas tree, menorah, Kwanzaa symbol or anything else put up by the gov't.

Why can't the gov't just stay secular and let religion be a personal and private matter? Why do people feel it necessary to constantly put religion in our faces?
I'm not a Constitutional Lawyer. Con. Law is a required course for law students.

The founders themselves were mostly atheist or agnostic. They were more worried about a Christian government persecuting other Christians, such as Puritans being persecuted by an Anglican government.

Your last comments are the most troubling though. Do you really think our government is in danger of becoming evangelized? Please. That is an unrealistic and irrational fear. Christmas trees are not in government buildings and haven't been for decades. Public schools today cant even use the term "Holiday Break" because it will offend those who do not celebrate holidays. People are taking secularism too far, and its worrisome that they could eventually use a secular government to channel their hate of Christianity into action.

I'm fine with a secular government, and if people don't want to be Christian, that's their decision. But when those people start complaining about religion being "put in their face" by having to be in the same room as a cross or the dollar-bill having the word God printed on it, I start to get worried. Those people have no place in this country, for they desire more than just a secular government - they want state-sponsored and state-promoted atheism, which of course goes hand in hand with communism.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2010, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Lakewood Ranch, FL
5,148 posts, read 7,728,457 times
Reputation: 6058
Cityrover...I understand your point. I am only saying that a lot of Christians appear to believe that their faith gives them a right to fight for the defense of their faith and whatever state entity they happen to live under. The problem with that, in my opinion, is that Christ never told Christians to do that. In fact, his instruction to his followers was to demonstrate God's love by doing just the opposite even if it means losing all that you care about. THAT is what was meant by turn the other cheek. In other words, Christ didn't really care a bit about nations or government. That stuff was completely unimportant compared to keeping and honoring God by loving one another. No, I don't want to be overrun by some other country, religion, etc. but, if I stay true to my Christianity, I wouldn't fight them...I'd forgive them. And the same should apply to those who are perturbed by the efforts of non-Christians to keep all aspects of religion out of the public square. A real Christian wouldn't fight against those people or have contempt for them. Their love would embrace those people and, in doing so, show those people why Christianity really is so special. It's not easy to be truly Christian.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top