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Old 08-04-2011, 06:44 AM
 
2,199 posts, read 1,210,631 times
Reputation: 805
Quote:
Originally Posted by akylin View Post
Since I am a student, my suggestion is to at least expand the marta to the three main universities in our city: Georgia Tech, Georgia State and Emory. The apartments near school are too expensive. If there is marta, we can choose to leave further.
Georgia Tech is near two MARTA stations.

Georgia State is near several MARTA stations.

Emory is not... but if you are going to Emory, a $40,000 a year school, rent probably is not a huge concern.
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Old 08-04-2011, 09:39 AM
 
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They are expanding it towards Emory its called the Clifton Corridor project. Voting for the sales tax will allow for it to get done.
MARTA > About Marta > Planning
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Old 08-04-2011, 10:04 AM
 
2,199 posts, read 1,210,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listennow32 View Post
They are expanding it towards Emory its called the Clifton Corridor project. Voting for the sales tax will allow for it to get done.
MARTA > About Marta > Planning
I believe it was removed from the list of projects. Again, $1 billion for a 4 mile extension just doesn't make sense.
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Old 08-04-2011, 11:04 AM
 
362 posts, read 204,117 times
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^It does when it's the transit project with the highest ridership projection per mile. Word on the street is that it's being added back in to the list.
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Old 08-04-2011, 11:07 AM
bu2
 
1,304 posts, read 513,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcorndog View Post
Comments above.

On the $1 billion 4 mile project I presume you are referring to the Emory line. Certainly you can't ignore cost-benefit, but this is one of the most important lines. Atlanta rated 91 out of 100 metro areas in a recent transit rating despite having one of the most extensive rail systems in the country. Outside of the northeast, only Chicago, San Francisco and relative newcomers LA and Dallas have bigger rail systems. Atlanta rated low because it doesn't take people where they want to go. Emory and Cumberland Mall/Galleria are two of the largest employment centers in the area and both are poorly served and not served at all by rail.

The Emory line is projected to go out towards Doraville because many of the employees come from Gwinnett County. So it serves more than just the Emory area. Actually, it serves those outside the immediate area who work in the area best.

I think its important to connect Cumberland Mall/Galleria in an effective fashion (I don't like light rail that ends at the Arts Center) but the reality is that the area it would run through (west of I-75) is one of the least densely populated areas in the city of Atlanta. Its only the two ends of the line that directly serve a lot of people.

Running lines into the suburbs is useless if it doesn't take people where they want to go. And once you get well outside 285, the density is such that park-n-ride buses not only cost much less, they provide better service since they stop more frequently.
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Old 08-04-2011, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Georgia
2,231 posts, read 1,205,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcorndog View Post
Georgia Tech is near two MARTA stations.

Georgia State is near several MARTA stations.

Emory is not... but if you are going to Emory, a $40,000 a year school, rent probably is not a huge concern.
Don't forget, college students are more likely to ride than the average commuter. If you've ever seen what some of these kids have to pay in parking, the prospect of riding transit can be awfully appealing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcorndog View Post
I believe it was removed from the list of projects. Again, $1 billion for a 4 mile extension just doesn't make sense.
But again, dollars per mile is the wrong number to use. One should instead use dollars per daily person-mile (for those so curious, that translates to $-days/person-miles, a rather awkward unit, lol). In a little more plain English, if there are two separate lines being proposed--Line A, which costs $100 million and would move 50,000 people 5 miles--and Line B, which costs $200 million and would move the 100,000 people 10 miles--then if all other factors are equal, the capital efficiency of each line is the same.
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Old 08-10-2011, 04:38 PM
 
83 posts, read 45,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcorndog View Post
See comments above.
First thing...
.13% (yes thats a decimal point) is the effective rate the US GOVERNMENT pays on money it borrows NOW...the interest rate the fed sets is effectively 0. No, we (you and I) cant borrow at that rate.
As for a debt crisis, no, I dont believe we have a "current" debt crisis. We have a no growth crisis (job crisis). We will have a debt crisis in 10-15 years if we dont solve the growth crisis and dont have a LONG TERM plan. Cutting spending now would be just about the stupidest thing the Federal Govt could do (notice I said NOW), yet some who dont know any better scream from the mountain tops that we are all going to go broke...not true. The US debt would be moot if we grow the economy 3-6% over the next 10 years even if spending increases mildly. The problem is, its very easy to make this look like we are about to go "broke" and politicians milk it for all its worth. Thats a big problem in our political system right now. Macro econ is not a simple concept to grasp and anyone who is knowledgeable is dismissed as irrelevant (btw...a good portion of the debt is owed back to the government but I'm not gonna explain that here).
As for Cherokee Co., they would receive 15% of all the tax money they raise locally as well as benefit from the 30 years that Dekalb, Fulton, and Atlanta have funded MARTA...and frankly if they vote no...so be it. Thats why we vote
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Old 08-10-2011, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Georgia
2,231 posts, read 1,205,417 times
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The trolling seems to have died down, so I figure this is as good a time as any to get back to the OP...and reveal my personal idea for a metro Atlanta transit expansion. Keep in mind that this was done with zero knowledge other than a basic understanding of where the high traffic corridors are around here and what lines could possibly fit in. So here we are:

Left: System Transit Map. Right: Legend




Buckhead, Emory




Midtown, Downtown, Virginia-Highlands




Downtown, satellite view (for improved color contrast)




Thoughts on the individual lines

I decided to rename all the lines except the streetcars by number, for two reasons: Once the number of lines starts to increase, it's a lot easier to remember the appropriate numbers than a bunch of odd colors. Also, avoiding such name-clogging avoids the effect of running out of common colors as being an excuse to not build a line!

Heavy Rail:
Line 1--Red line. The regional roundtable would extend it 400 to Holcomb Bridge Road, but I'd like it extend it one exit further, for one simple reason: The Mansell Road exit has a park-and-ride lot. Whichever station serves as the line terminus will have a disproportionate demand for parking, and it will be important to plan for that.
Line 2--Gold line. Extends it one stop on the north end and to the future international terminal on the south end.
Line 3--Green line. If the Clifton Road Corridor were extended southward to the existing blue line, it could continue westward until it picked up the existing green line. Running in reverse, it could go up the northeast or the north rail line, but I'm thinking that to have a more nearly straight path, it should go north with the red line.
Line 4--Blue line. Extends one stop west to I-285, hopefully creating a long-term parking lot or garage.
Line 5--New heavy rail line. By far, I think, this would be the least feasible line to build simply because of how long it would be underground. So it may need to be held off for a couple decades. However, it would add a much-needed second north-south line through downtown. It would also add a direct rail connection to Georgia Tech's west campus and to Turner Field. And since it runs parallel to a freight rail line on the south side, it could be extended in the future. Note: I originally had this line looping around Brookhaven and finishing at Arts Center, but I think it makes far more sense to merge it with the northbound lines and run it up through Lindbergh. That wouldn't require any extra track.

Note: Because lines 1&3 and then 2&5 share lines on the north side, lines 3 and 5 can easily be swapped north of Lindbergh.

Light rail:
Line 6--Cobb County light rail. Strictly speaking in terms of right-of-way width, upon further study, I think this line will actually fit up US 41, parallel to the highway on the east side. But instead of taking it straight up the highway all the way to Kennesaw, I think it might be nice to detour it into downtown Marietta--and yes, it would go underground there. But this would not be the northernmost park-and-ride--CCT already has a park-and-ride lot off South Marietta Pkwy.
Line 7--I-285 North and Gwinnett County light rail. I think it makes a lot more sense to run it straight up the freight rail corridor instead of snaking it up Satellite Blvd., simply because a straighter route = faster route. And in Sandy Springs, going up to Abernathy and THEN cutting across toward Dunwoody avoids having to widen Hammond Dr.
Line 8--I-20 East. Basically runs right beside I-20 the whole way except in downtown. Also runs reasonably close to Turner Field, though not as close as Line 5. Note: These two lines do not intersect except near Garnett station.
Beltline. This line needs no introduction. On the east side, I routed it through Little Five Points and down Moreland Ave., per this thread. I honestly don't expect that to be the route it takes, but hey, this thread is just for fun.

Streetcars:
Auburn--Actual route of the planned streetcar, both named and colored for Auburn Ave. (Sorry, War Eagle fans, I'm NOT coloring this line blue and orange!)
Peach--Peachtree Streetcar. Runs almost entirely on Peachtree St./Rd. from Garnett to Brookhaven station.
10th St. I know there have been plans for running an east-west streetcar through Midtown and across the downtown connector. Only question in my mind is whether it should go here or along North Ave. instead.
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Old 08-10-2011, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Georgia
2,231 posts, read 1,205,417 times
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Now it's time for my commuter rail routes. Note that these are all rather similar to what's been proposed before, which makes sense, considering that there are only so many rail lines around. All these routes would use about 99% existing track, the other 1% for switches, turns, etc. The legend lists the proposed stops, which of course can be increased or decreased in number. Because of this, I won't go into great detail, but here are a few notes:

-All commuter rail routes have the proposed Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal, which will be walking distance from three of the downtown transit stops, as one of their termini.
-Whenever possible, routes stop at outer termini of light or heavy rail lines. This is the justification for extending heavy rail Line 2 (gold line), to have room for a commuter rail station.
-There is a Columbus-Macon route not visible on the map, but it is in the legend. It's not just about Atlanta, you know; once we're at this level, this has to be a statewide initiative.
-With the exception of routes between Columbus and Macon on that line, you can reach any stop on any line with a maximum of two transfers. Within the metro area itself, most point-to-point trips require at most one transfer.

Left: Map. Right: Legend

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Old 08-10-2011, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,182 posts, read 2,095,246 times
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That commuter rail line map.... aren't those lines official, in teh planning books?
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