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Old 01-14-2011, 11:40 AM
 
1,546 posts, read 2,553,367 times
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To avoid getting the thread about Atlanta songs closed, I decided to start a new thread where the sociocultural ramifications on music in Atlanta can be discussed. I'd rather keep the other thread pretty light...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
-You have it all mixed up. Rap music hurt Atlanta's image, it didn't help it. Things were going great in the post-segregation era. Some would even consider the 70s-90s Atlanta's golden age. Then the 2000s hit, rappers discovered "the ATL" and things have been going downhill since.
Even if you consider the 70's to the 90's Atlanta's golden era, the negative things that Atlanta rappers were talking about were going on then -- in may cases moreso than today -- the only thing hip-hop did was expose these things (crime/poverty/drugs, etc.) and place them in the public eye.

It is kind of a double-edged sword because people had gotten rich from exposing these truths. Then, in the 2000's, people thought that if they continued to talk about the same stuff, (whether its real of not) they can get rich too... Then the listeners start thinking its real and repeating the formula...

After all, Goodie Mob talking about how "Dirty" the south was/is is a far cry from Roscoe Dash talking about how he blows stacks at Lenox every weekend on Polo...

Just my humble opinion...
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Old 01-14-2011, 12:11 PM
 
1,301 posts, read 1,859,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
To avoid getting the thread about Atlanta songs closed, I decided to start a new thread where the sociocultural ramifications on music in Atlanta can be discussed. I'd rather keep the other thread pretty light...



Even if you consider the 70's to the 90's Atlanta's golden era, the negative things that Atlanta rappers were talking about were going on then -- in may cases moreso than today -- the only thing hip-hop did was expose these things (crime/poverty/drugs, etc.) and place them in the public eye.

It is kind of a double-edged sword because people had gotten rich from exposing these truths. Then, in the 2000's, people thought that if they continued to talk about the same stuff, (whether its real of not) they can get rich too... Then the listeners start thinking its real and repeating the formula...

After all, Goodie Mob talking about how "Dirty" the south was/is is a far cry from Roscoe Dash talking about how he blows stacks at Lenox every weekend on Polo...

Just my humble opinion...
I wont dabble to much into this thread but I would like someone to point out the positives that hip-hop has contributed to black culture in Atlanta. For many the negatives of this music far out way the positives. Interesting to see what can be said in a positive light about a music that glorifies, prison, murder, selling drugs, abusing women, killing snitches, etc. to name just a few.
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Old 01-14-2011, 12:47 PM
 
864 posts, read 855,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suprascooby22 View Post
I wont dabble to much into this thread but I would like someone to point out the positives that hip-hop has contributed to black culture in Atlanta. For many the negatives of this music far out way the positives. Interesting to see what can be said in a positive light about a music that glorifies, prison, murder, selling drugs, abusing women, killing snitches, etc. to name just a few.
None of that is real hip hop. You don't have a clue what you are talking about.
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Old 01-14-2011, 12:56 PM
 
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Well its made most young people regardless of race in the south aspire to become drug dealers or rappers.
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Old 01-14-2011, 12:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suprascooby22 View Post
I wont dabble to much into this thread but I would like someone to point out the positives that hip-hop has contributed to black culture in Atlanta. For many the negatives of this music far out way the positives. Interesting to see what can be said in a positive light about a music that glorifies, prison, murder, selling drugs, abusing women, killing snitches, etc. to name just a few.
I think it just depends on the artist... For example, Outkast, Goodie Mob, B.o.B, and even Ludacris (to a certain extent) have had a more positive impact than say a Jeezy, Gucci, Waka, or O.J. Da Juiceman... I think the real question is which type of artist is promoted more heavily and why...
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Old 01-14-2011, 01:01 PM
 
1,546 posts, read 2,553,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nedergras View Post
Well its made most young people regardless of race in the south aspire to become drug dealers or rappers.
Do you think that this is just an issue in the south or nationwide?
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Old 01-14-2011, 01:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
Do you think that this is just an issue in the south or nationwide?
It's nationwide, but it is more amplified in the south due to the music and culture.
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Old 01-14-2011, 01:04 PM
 
1,158 posts, read 2,265,824 times
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Most of the Hip Hop coming out of the South is what I call strip club music. It sounds best in a strip club. Other than tht it has zero value. (So obviously, when or if I go to such a place, I want to hear..."all that a$$ in those jeans..."
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Old 01-14-2011, 01:06 PM
 
1,301 posts, read 1,859,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muxBuppie View Post
None of that is real hip hop. You don't have a clue what you are talking about.
Please enlighten us oh wise one.
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Old 01-14-2011, 01:30 PM
 
99 posts, read 179,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suprascooby22 View Post
Please enlighten us oh wise one.
I'm guessing he's focused on what would be the semantics for broader society.

For him, what you speak of is merely rap and true hip-hop is much more enlightening. There is a real distinction, but for the most part, rap as an industry has been lumped with hip-hop (in its historical context) and has diluted its significance culturally.
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