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Old 01-20-2011, 08:19 AM
 
3,130 posts, read 3,076,907 times
Reputation: 1534

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That was a brilliant piece in how efficient and straight to the point it was. Sad but true.
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Old 01-20-2011, 10:38 AM
 
1,132 posts, read 1,568,580 times
Reputation: 486
wow
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Old 01-20-2011, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
708 posts, read 1,363,820 times
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Someone used up all the pages of his Word a Day calendar, and it's not even 3 weeks into the New Year.

As a white former student in that district back in the 70's (Bob Mathis elementary) I had hoped to read that the environment had gotten better. It clearly hasn't. My parents put me in private school after I was dragged into the boy's bathroom in the 3rd grade (fortunately a teacher saw the incident and came running in after them).

It's disappointing to read that the environment is still charged, and that they're still catering to the lowest common denominator, to be sure.
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Old 01-20-2011, 12:17 PM
 
Location: ATL by way of Los Angeles
394 posts, read 531,434 times
Reputation: 278
As a former DeKalb County educator and the ex-husband of a current DeKalb County educator, I can attest that this article is accurate. The bureaucracy and top-heaviness that I saw in DeKalb was one of things that drove me out of the field.

Where I'm from, most schools had maybe one or two assistant principals at the most and they were always visible and vigilant. Where I taught, there were four assistant principals that simply turned their heads when they saw kids hanging out in the halls during classes or doing things that were obviously wrong. One of the assistant principals was the so-called "Dean of Discipline". In our orientation, his message to the teachers was, in his own words, "Don't send them to us". Well, if you are the Dean of Discipline and a teacher has limited disciplinary power, then what is stopping you from doing your job? What was really disheartening is that they would have the students sign the Student Handbook every year, yet they would not follow through with the actions that were detailed in the book. If you have in writing that a child should be suspended or expelled for certain actions, then that is what needs to be honored.

The administrators also bowed down to the parents as well. When I was in high school, if a teacher gave me detention or if I was written up for an offense, my parents never questioned the teacher or administration about it. The administrators where I was acted as though I had to get parental consent in order to write a child up or otherwise enforce the rules. I personally was not afraid of any parent even when they tried to threaten physical violence against me. However, the administration was. Fast forward to 2011 and that school has seen a revolving door of principals and assistant principals come through. One can assume that it is hard to establish order and consistently approve a school if your administration is changing every other year.
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Old 01-20-2011, 12:34 PM
 
15,076 posts, read 9,828,472 times
Reputation: 3607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big L View Post
When I was in high school, if a teacher gave me detention or if I was written up for an offense, my parents never questioned the teacher or administration about it.
In my era it was the double whupping rule. If you got in trouble at school the teacher and/or principal whupped you, and then when you got home your daddy whupped you again for getting whupped.

Crude, but effective.

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Old 01-20-2011, 01:42 PM
 
Location: ATL by way of Los Angeles
394 posts, read 531,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
In my era it was the double whupping rule. If you got in trouble at school the teacher and/or principal whupped you, and then when you got home your daddy whupped you again for getting whupped.

Crude, but effective.

Corporal punishment in school is illegal where I'm from, but I know what you are talking about. If a teacher or administrator had to tell my mother that I was acting up or had done something wrong, you better believe that I didn't do it again *lol*. These days, if a teacher calls a parent to tell them that Little Johnny is acting up, the parent is either ready to jump on the teacher or refuses to believe that Little Johnny could actually act up.
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Old 01-20-2011, 01:43 PM
 
8,712 posts, read 12,332,087 times
Reputation: 1971
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
In my era it was the double whupping rule. If you got in trouble at school the teacher and/or principal whupped you, and then when you got home your daddy whupped you again for getting whupped.

Crude, but effective.


This link/article mentions this very thing:

A superintendent looks at the “good old days” of school | Get Schooled
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Old 01-20-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: ATL by way of Los Angeles
394 posts, read 531,434 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
I just read this shortly before you posted it on here. It was an interesting read, especially considering how much both schools and society as a whole has changed over the years.
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Old 01-20-2011, 02:42 PM
 
15,076 posts, read 9,828,472 times
Reputation: 3607
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
Oh, I'm just kidding of course...sort of. We never tramped six miles through the snow, and my parents were more inclined to non-physical discipline, although that was extremely effective. There was no doubt whatsoever that if you got in trouble at school, you'd also get in trouble at home. Parents backed up the teachers and just about everybody in school knew it.

So I wouldn't advocate actually whupping kids. Although there are times when a swift whack with a rolled up newspaper might help get the message across. But I would strongly advocate parents who are closely involved and who stick by the teachers.

And of course there was much about the "good old days" that wasn't good at all. What I do think was a major positive from those times, however, was the strong sense that you went to school to learn and better yourself, that you obeyed the teachers, and that you as a student were accountable for learning the material. That was true even when you had old beat up textbooks, desks from the 1920s and teachers who weren't worth a flip. Not to mention no computers, since they hadn't been invented yet.

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Old 01-21-2011, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
216 posts, read 171,825 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
...but who is he trying to impress with the big words?
LOL! I think Dr. Blackwood said to heck with writing for your intended audience. I appreciate him not insulting our intelligence by writing on a 6th grade level, but IMHO he went way overboard. That article is fine for a peer-reviewed journal or other Education-trade specialty media, but it's not appropriate for general audiences... or anybody with less than post-graduate exposure to Education or the social science fields, for that matter.
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