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Old 01-24-2011, 02:27 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 8,773,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Curiosity got the best of me and I did a little reading / research on why the capital was moved from Milledgeville: Turns out, the city fathers of Atlanta RECRUITED IT to boost the fledgling city's status / influence and even offered to pay to build a new state capitol and other government buildings if the legislature agreed. And voila -- the rest is history!

How incredibly typical of "can-do" Atlanta, and what better example of the self-promotion and sense of importance that have propelled Atlanta from the very beginning?

georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu/capital.htm
What do you suppose drew these 'can-do' people to Atlanta? English, Scot, Irish, Scots-Irish, African American, German, and Jew,IIRC? I suppose we need a list of the founders.

English would have been highly motivated after the Revolutionary War, Scots/Culloden, Irish/potato famine and religious freedom --off the top of my head.



http://www.city-directory.com/Overvi...y/history1.htm

ie---
183?
White Hall Tavern established by Charner Humphries near Atlanta at the corner of present-day Gordon and Lee Streets.
Hardy Ivey becomes Atlanta's first permanent white settler, building his cabin at present corner of Courtland Avenue and International Blvd.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardy_Ivy

1842
Willis and Julia Carlisle move to Terminus from Marietta, putting their grocery store/home across from Thrasher's store. Their child, Julia, born in August, is the first baby born in Atlanta. (She died in 1919.)
The settlement of six buildings and 30 inhabitants gets a name change, from "Terminus" to "Marthasville," after the daughter of Governor Wilson Lumpkin. (They wanted to call it "Lumpkin," but he pursuaded them to name it after his daughter instead. On behalf of all of us, I want to thank you, Governor. But for your foresight, we might have been saddled with the "1996 Lumpkin Olympics.")
The new depot, now the tallest building in town, is built. It is two stories tall.
The first-ever use of ether as an anesthetic for surgery is performed by Dr. Crawford Long of Georgia.
1843

Last edited by TakeAhike; 01-24-2011 at 02:36 PM..
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Old 01-24-2011, 03:14 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 6,421,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
And wouldn't it have made more sense for Georgia government to have remained dead center in the middle of the state, rather than being concentrated in the northern third? No doubt, this would have contributed to our state's population being more evenly distributed as well methinks.
I doubt it. Atlanta's progress and prosperity has largely been the result of local business and civic leadership; seems that state leadership has played a relatively minor role. Had the capital remained in Milledgeville, it probably wouldn't have gotten any larger than Montgomery or Tallahassee, or, at most, Columbia.
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Old 01-24-2011, 03:36 PM
 
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In a word "gnats". People wanted to move above the Fall Line to get away from the gnats.

So gnats and the boll weevil held Savannah back.

And as others have pointed out, there are plenty of counterexamples of large cities that are not the state capital. Savannah would have been larger as the capital but the gnats ensured Atlanta's ascendancy...and the railroads helped too.
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Old 01-24-2011, 03:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
In a word "gnats". People wanted to move above the Fall Line to get away from the gnats.

So gnats and the boll weevil held Savannah back.

And as others have pointed out, there are plenty of counterexamples of large cities that are not the state capital. Savannah would have been larger as the capital but the gnats ensured Atlanta's ascendancy...and the railroads helped too.
By George, I think you've got it.

I recall that the Scots/Highlanders who were displaced after Culloden were naturally inclined to seek the mountains--cooler climate more similar to Scotland--many of those eventually settled in western NC. The Lowlanders seemingly preferred the Piedmont area--Decatur.
Then there was the soil--red clay could grow vegetables and some cotton.

The Buckhead area was good for hunting.

^^^
1848
Moses Formwalt becomes Atlanta's first mayor, defeating Jonathan Norcross for the job. The polling place is Thomas Kil's grocery at present Five Points; 215 voters show up.
The first Atlanta city council meeting approves wooden sidewalks, a ban on Sunday business, and a marshal.
September Crime Spree: Atlanta's first homicide, end of a family feud, occurs when William Terrell stabs James McWilliams; Terrell gets four years hard labor. Also, Judge Francis Cone stabs Alexander Stephens at the Atlanta Hotel; Stephens survives, later becomes Governor of the state, then Vice President of the Confederacy.
The first town jail, so flimsy that prisoners could tip it over to escape, is erected at Pryor and Alabama Streets.

Last edited by TakeAhike; 01-24-2011 at 04:00 PM..
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Old 01-24-2011, 03:51 PM
 
6,832 posts, read 4,259,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantagreg30127 View Post
It's already been said in previous posts, but Savannah was not only "planned" but was also supposedly planned heavily to be Georgia's "big city" by the early leaders of the City. One to rival and and all other port cities (or even NYC). Atlanta was just a bunch of new rail lines (later) that got slapped in the middle of nowhere (at the time) for distribution, but of course rail overtook shipping and poof - history. Supposedly that's why the street layout in Atlanta is like a handful fo spaghetti that was just thrown on a plate - even while the City grew, they never expected it to keep growing, and growing, and growing.. and by the time they realized "oops, it's gonna be BIG", it was of course too late to do much about the street layout, etc.
Probably the best description of Atlanta's growth I've seen. It's a shame that Atlanta didn't layout a nice sized area for its government buildings. It's such a mess. You can stand at the capitol building and see and hear the I-75 traffic. And the city and county buildings should have their own areas too.

Quote:
I do like Savannah overall. I have to admit I'm more partial to Charleston (larger, cleaner in the historic district, etc), but the two of them together make for a really good short vacation.
Georgia has been pushing hard to improve and expand Savannah as a shipping port. IKEA and other companies are putting in distributions centers there.
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Old 01-24-2011, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Yep. Unfortunately, even in our little pockets of neighborhood retail such as Virginia-Highland and Inman Park, the development is sporadic and only a few blocks long, and rarely even one full block in depth. We are definitely starved for more neighborhood commercial zoning.

It's going to be a tough slog, however. The Atlanta area -- even most areas within the city limits -- were laid out with the automobile as the dominant means of transportation. There are spots where you can walk to bars and restaurants, but it's still difficult to find many places where you can carry out a full range of activities sans car. Downtown, Midtown, Decatur and even parts of Buckhead are getting there, and there are bright spots at Perimeter, Smyrna, Mayretta and several other locations. Too bad the country got hammered by the recession just as momentum was building.
This is totally taking it off topic, but you touched on something that makes me ponder. The invention of the automobile was certainly a revolutionary one, but it transformed the nature of cities/development. This in turn created various detrimental effects in society, including the way people socialize and the negative environmental impact, that make me wish automobiles hadn't taken off as much as they did.

Granted for trucking and commerce autos are a huge convenience, but for society at large, what if everywhere from rural towns to big cities embraced a more pedestrian-friendly approach to city planning? I think we'd have far fewer health risks and a generally happier populace. This may be a reach, but think about all the effects of cars. What ill-effects really come from walking and having medium density neighborhoods with all of your conveniences, y'know convenient?
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Old 01-24-2011, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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I agree. People like Henry Grady played a large role in promoting a progressive vision of what Atlanta could be, and was very obvious about it. Many of these other southern cities like Savannah tend to have public & private leadership that for lack of any better terms, are fairly regressive in their view of the world.

It's why you see cities like Birmingham, Alabama who also has a unique charm to it and yet could never get a good a jump-off to prosperity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
I doubt it. Atlanta's progress and prosperity has largely been the result of local business and civic leadership; seems that state leadership has played a relatively minor role. Had the capital remained in Milledgeville, it probably wouldn't have gotten any larger than Montgomery or Tallahassee, or, at most, Columbia.
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Old 01-24-2011, 05:50 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 6,421,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bizchick86 View Post
This is totally taking it off topic, but you touched on something that makes me ponder. The invention of the automobile was certainly a revolutionary one, but it transformed the nature of cities/development. This in turn created various detrimental effects in society, including the way people socialize and the negative environmental impact, that make me wish automobiles hadn't taken off as much as they did.

Granted for trucking and commerce autos are a huge convenience, but for society at large, what if everywhere from rural towns to big cities embraced a more pedestrian-friendly approach to city planning? I think we'd have far fewer health risks and a generally happier populace. This may be a reach, but think about all the effects of cars. What ill-effects really come from walking and having medium density neighborhoods with all of your conveniences, y'know convenient?
It's not the automobile itself that was the culprit, but a particular set of factors around the end of WWII that converged that caused government policy to favor suburban development and highway construction over a more urban-oriented investment strategy (which would have also preserved our rural areas).
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Old 01-24-2011, 06:49 PM
 
Location: New York City Area
389 posts, read 349,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
By the way -- and I know I sound like a broken record on this topic -- Savannah's superb walkability and lovely urban feel is the result of its concentrated blocks of lowrise buildings, many of them one and two stories. Tall buildings have nothing to do with it, since there are none.

So I will say it once again: the thing that would do most to urbanize Atlanta in the coming decades is lowrise and midrise development. We have enough skyscrapers to last us a long, long time. Let's hope planners and developers keep this in mind. Look to Savannah!

Totally agree.
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Old 01-24-2011, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
8,255 posts, read 6,484,398 times
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JUST TO MAKE YOU ALL INSANELY JEALOUS ...

This morning I had an appointment on the edge of downtown Savannah, in one of the few areas that's really not fit for pedestrians. But afterward, I moved my car and parked in one of the 2-hour "free" spaces on Broughton Street and set out to run some errands: I walked to my bank, the city annex to pay my water bill, the Georgia Power office to pay my light bill, the post office to mail some other stuff, and then dropped by another business to inquire about a personal matter. Next, and still on foot, I headed to lunch at a favorite restaurant, stopping along the way at a sundries shop to pick up the morning paper. After lunch, and on the way back to my car, some new artwork hanging in the windows of a gallery caught my eye, and I admired that for a few moments before sticking my head in a retail store and saying "hi" to a friend. Then I bought an ice cream cone and sat on a park bench to catch up on email, C-D, Facebook and the like. I returned to my car with time to spare on my two-hour limit and drove home, feeling good that all my "to do" chores for the day had been accomplished.

How many different car trips would it have taken to make all those stops in Atlanta or any "normal" place?

JUST ANOTHER DAY LIVING IN THIS INCREDIBLE CITY!
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