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Old 02-06-2011, 09:22 PM
 
62 posts, read 99,766 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RainyRainyDay View Post
taphest,

I love your open and positive attitude. Most people getting the kind of feedback you've been getting would write an angry and defensive post or two. You deserve an A for attitude and online courtesy!

I think your house expectations are out of line with your budget - except perhaps if you are willing to go a really long way out from the city, as I think you mentioned in your original post. You just won't find the house, neighborhood and schools you want at that price. There are basically three factors - house, neighborhood/schools, price - and you can pick any two. In the area where I live (northeast Cobb), for example, it's very safe with tremendous schools and right now there are lots of family homes available under $250K. However, those homes are older and smaller than you've specified and probably don't have gourmet kitchens either.

As for the rest, it reads like you'd need a family income in maybe the $200K range....
Well, it's a forum and I always welcome other perspectives. Again, thanks for sharing your's. We should be able to have respectful dialogue w/o taking offense when others do not agree with our viewpoint. That's what diversity is all about!

As far as my house requirements being out of alignment with w/ my budget...I disagree. Currently, we can purchase a home in Suwanee that meets our criteria for around $250k, and I consider this to be a considerable distance from the city.
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:16 PM
 
62 posts, read 99,766 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcsteiner View Post
What do you consider to be an acceptable area? Or an acceptable lifestyle? And how do you evaluate schools? National lists? Something else?

We live in a nice area in SE Cobb with decent schools (good elementary and middle schools and a middling high school with an excellent IB program), and our commutes are 5 and 8 miles on sideroads (no interstates). Our house in a safe wooded subdivision with a pool and tennis, and in 2005 we paid less than $250k for the 4BR 2.5bath home that we live in. It's worth maybe $215-220k now. There are houses available in our area right now for the same pricepoint.

What are your expectations based on?
I apologize for not being specific. I posted a similar question that addresses your question, therefore I didn't include it here. Marietta is on our list, although most of the houses are older than what we're looking for.
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Old 02-07-2011, 06:55 AM
 
Location: East Cobb
2,205 posts, read 4,208,350 times
Reputation: 864
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
The most terrifying thing about the job market nowadays in my opinion is the lack of stability. You can spend years going down a path to a career you've dreamed about(or at least felt you could tolerate) only to find out it has been digitized or sent overseas. Employers no longer have any loyalty to employees and vise versa. In order to survive and thrive in this job market you have to be extremely agile and persistent. Even then you need lots of luck.
Great post, DTL3000. What you wrote in your closing paragraph, quoted above, is completely true of my field, software engineering, and I can see it's happening in others as well. Because this is a fairly recent evolution, many people seem not to have quite grasped the situation yet, and still repeat the formula that was pretty good, a generation or two ago. "Set goals! Get a degree, or a more advanced degree! Work hard!" Those are still all good things, of course, but they may not be enough. A person can be smart, highly educated and hard-working, but have a decent career elude them because they're not agile or lucky enough.
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Old 02-07-2011, 03:52 PM
 
62 posts, read 99,766 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RainyRainyDay;17760873.
A person can be smart, highly educated and hard-working, but have a decent career elude them because they're not agile or lucky enough.
I concur!
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Old 02-07-2011, 04:25 PM
 
2,642 posts, read 5,275,755 times
Reputation: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanackle View Post
I totally agree with the OP. In general, people do receive less and less compared to what we think we should be getting in return for our time and skills. This is partly a consequence of the free market economy we 'enjoy' in America. Those that run the businesses 95% of the time will cut costs and people and pay in order to be more or even perhaps excessively profitable before taking care of the people that bring them success. Even though it is contrary to the way most Americans believe, there does come a point when it is fundamentally wrong to make more profit, because it comes at the expense of people. Work harder, no breaks, cuts in pay, less time off, fewer or no benefits, don't even think of taking a vacation without feeling guilty when you get back... etc etc etc.

In this case businesses are robbing peter (employees) to pay paul (shareholders). Rich become richer and the poor or middle class less well off. Look at the distribution of wealth in America. It is sad and quite frankly frightening. The "class" division as it stands will only last so much longer. Something will give.


I know I have ranted a little myself, and perhaps many of you will not agree.
OMG, this...a lot.
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Old 02-07-2011, 04:59 PM
 
8,687 posts, read 11,954,445 times
Reputation: 1940
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
Back in the day (probably 50's-70's) someone with a high school education could go straight to work n some factory after graduation and practically have a job with benefits for life if they showed up every day. Sure, it wasn't the most exciting life but one person could usually support a family at a modest lifestyle. Seniority actually meant something and the work environment was probably a lot less tense as far as jockeying for promotions. Those who obtained a bachelor's degree could expect the same stability with extra pay and perks and the possibility of rising towards the top. Masters degrees probably weren't nearly as common and only those looking to reach the very tip top felt them to be necessary. PhDs were for academics and scientists.(GSU now has a PhD in Business...WTF?)

Nowadays most manufacturing jobs are in China or other places like that and the ones that are still here either don't pay crap are are so highly competitive it's not even funny. And forget about a bachelor's degree being worth much. In my opinion it's worth less than a HS diploma in the old days. In fact, I'd recommend trade school for most people who aren't interested in becoming doctors, engineers, lawyers, teachers or any other "profession." The thing is, "trade school" is still considered "13th grade" and only good enough for Bubba with the close-set eyes. Americans turn their nose up at trade schools while other countries emphasize them as a vital tool to keep their countries competitive in industry and new technology. Even white collar jobs are ending up in places like India. Masters degrees are a dime a dozen. I know several people with them who are having trouble finding work. Yet people still think traditional higher education is still bulletproof and are willing to go well into six figures of debt thinking they'll be rolling in dough and living the high life(instead of just drinking it). One of the main reasons I dropped out of law school was that so many lemmings have spoiled the market(I admit I was almost one). Of course another reason was that I have something called a soul...

The most terrifying thing about the job market nowadays in my opinion is the lack of stability. You can spend years going down a path to a career you've dreamed about(or at least felt you could tolerate) only to find out it has been digitized or sent overseas. Employers no longer have any loyalty to employees and vise versa. In order to survive and thrive in this job market you have to be extremely agile and persistent. Even then you need lots of luck.
Brilliant.
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Old 02-07-2011, 05:04 PM
 
397 posts, read 406,340 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanackle View Post
I totally agree with the OP. In general, people do receive less and less compared to what we think we should be getting in return for our time and skills. This is partly a consequence of the free market economy we 'enjoy' in America. .
That and and an inflated value of ones skills. Who is putting these thoughts in people's heads? Parents? Teachers? TV?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nanackle View Post
Those that run the businesses 95% of the time will cut costs and people and pay in order to be more or even perhaps excessively profitable before taking care of the people that bring them success.
And if they really needed those people who brough them success, their business will suffer without them. IF their job can be done just as effectively by someone else for a cheaper rate, then that is the business owner's decision to go with more efficiency. If they overpay for their labor, they may be run out of business by a competitor who is providing a better value to it's customers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nanackle View Post
In this case businesses are robbing peter (employees) to pay paul (shareholders). Rich become richer and the poor or middle class less well off. Look at the distribution of wealth in America. It is sad and quite frankly frightening. The "class" division as it stands will only last so much longer. Something will give..
Many companies make becoming an owner or shareholder very accesible. If you think they are making too much money, become an owner. Buy some stock. Share in the winnings - or as we know - ownership can also bring losses.
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Old 02-07-2011, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
9,913 posts, read 14,241,603 times
Reputation: 2733
Quote:
Originally Posted by taphest View Post
I apologize for not being specific. I posted a similar question that addresses your question, therefore I didn't include it here. Marietta is on our list, although most of the houses are older than what we're looking for.
There are areas in Cobb other than Marietta (or faux Marietta places like East Cobb) which are worth moving to, at least in my opinion.

Sorry for missing your other thread ... I didn't put two and two together.
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Old 02-07-2011, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
9,913 posts, read 14,241,603 times
Reputation: 2733
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanackle View Post
In this case businesses are robbing peter (employees) to pay paul (shareholders). Rich become richer and the poor or middle class less well off. Look at the distribution of wealth in America. It is sad and quite frankly frightening. The "class" division as it stands will only last so much longer. Something will give.
I'm seeing high levels of frustration and even anger in places that I didn't see it a few years ago, some of it from people that I didn't expect to see it from.
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Old 02-07-2011, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Atlanta,GA
2,614 posts, read 3,668,316 times
Reputation: 1034
Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post

Notice that nowhere did I say that success = money or material things. Success is whatever you deem it to be, but the strategy for achieving it is essentially the same, although the tactics may be different.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JC84 View Post
To the OP- I feel the same way. You always hear about how you should go to school, get good grades, work hard, go to college and then you'll be able to get a better job. I don't know how old you are but I went to college, worked hard for good grades (as did my boyfriend) now that we've graduated, we can't find good jobs. Or in his case, any in his field. I had my first dose of reality at age 25, when I realized my bachelor's degree (in business) isn't worth anything.


Its just so disheartening to work so hard...for what?
This is not aimed at you, personally......but to answer that question:

To pay off those expensive school loans, the house (that's worth less than half it was 5 yrs ago, the forever depreciating and money hoarding luxury car, expensive clothes, electronics, and trinkets you bought to "live it up"..... Only to find out, you may need a few credit cards to continue living that way, until you're burnt out.
Then:

Call Consolidated!!!!!



Quote:
Originally Posted by noah View Post
In general I think the list of wants that have become needs to many has grown considerably. As the saying goes our parents spent 30 years getting the "nice" stuff that many of us now want and expect in our 20's. If your always trying to keep up with the wants it will be a tough one IMO. If one does pay their dues, saves and invests, then they should be able to enjoy it later on. Easier said for some then others.

Some of us are content with a used car and would rather spend the money on paying down our home or investing then purchasing a new car that falls in value. Bottom line for these people I think is they live healthier, less stressful lives and that is important to them.
Speak the truth NOAH!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
reminds me of those commercials for that JG wnetworth---I need cash NOW!

Go sing for it!


Seriously, we all would like a better lifestyle, and reality is always a shock. For the OP, well, all I can say is, it will always be like this, the lifestyle you want will always be slightly out of your reach. That doesn't mean you can't try to close the gap as much as possible.

I think parents owe it to their kids to educate them about the economic realities of life, don't just let them bump into it with silly pieces of advice, like do what you want and the money will flow, etc, etc. At least give them a heads up about reality before they bump into it, like the OP has.
Good advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantagreg30127 View Post
Regarding "5": Most "average" Americans do have to save in order to buy furniture and electronics. Those are not (for many) considered regular things that you shop frequently for. For many, regular things include food, needed clothing, personal daily-use products, etc. Furniture and electronics start to enter the "splurge" category.

Regarding "6": You don't need a luxury car to have a reliable car. Just don't buy another Accord.

Take the money difference between the luxmobile and a good normal model car, and put it in your retirement account or your child's college fund, or, as a down payment on a nicer home.
Good points....And Accords are good cars.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taphest View Post
I am aware of the difference between everyday items and items that are needed but not bought on a regular basis. When it's necessary to buy these things, I want to be able to afford them without having to wait an extra 2-3 years. While I"m on the subject, I know the difference btwn luxury and reliable...I have reliable and now I want luxury. And I should be able to have luxury (if our budget allows for it) without feeling guilty. Would this mean less money for the retirement fund? Hopefully, not. I will continue making sacrifices and staying focused and will try not letting my so-called "housewives" mentality get the best of me :-)
If you are budgeting for luxury, then you don't have enough money. Sorry to break it to you. Keep the Accord, my dear. It's a great car, nothing to be sorry about. Greg's advice is golden here. Remember reliability is peace of mind. That's more important than anything luxurious....

To be philosophical, peace of mind is a luxury many don't have. Be happy you can have some of it.

And F' the "Housewives" mentality. That's what's probably causing most divorces in this country...


Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
Back in the day (probably 50's-70's) someone with a high school education could go straight to work n some factory after graduation and practically have a job with benefits for life if they showed up every day. Sure, it wasn't the most exciting life but one person could usually support a family at a modest lifestyle. Seniority actually meant something and the work environment was probably a lot less tense as far as jockeying for promotions. Those who obtained a bachelor's degree could expect the same stability with extra pay and perks and the possibility of rising towards the top. Masters degrees probably weren't nearly as common and only those looking to reach the very tip top felt them to be necessary. PhDs were for academics and scientists.(GSU now has a PhD in Business...WTF?)

Nowadays most manufacturing jobs are in China or other places like that and the ones that are still here either don't pay crap are are so highly competitive it's not even funny. And forget about a bachelor's degree being worth much. In my opinion it's worth less than a HS diploma in the old days. In fact, I'd recommend trade school for most people who aren't interested in becoming doctors, engineers, lawyers, teachers or any other "profession." The thing is, "trade school" is still considered "13th grade" and only good enough for Bubba with the close-set eyes. Americans turn their nose up at trade schools while other countries emphasize them as a vital tool to keep their countries competitive in industry and new technology. Even white collar jobs are ending up in places like India. Masters degrees are a dime a dozen. I know several people with them who are having trouble finding work. Yet people still think traditional higher education is still bulletproof and are willing to go well into six figures of debt thinking they'll be rolling in dough and living the high life(instead of just drinking it). One of the main reasons I dropped out of law school was that so many lemmings have spoiled the market(I admit I was almost one). Of course another reason was that I have something called a soul...

The most terrifying thing about the job market nowadays in my opinion is the lack of stability. You can spend years going down a path to a career you've dreamed about(or at least felt you could tolerate) only to find out it has been digitized or sent overseas. Employers no longer have any loyalty to employees and vise versa. In order to survive and thrive in this job market you have to be extremely agile and persistent. Even then you need lots of luck.

True, true, true...
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