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Old 02-16-2011, 12:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
These are your duly elected representatives. Don't you trust them to do the right thing? When they are ready for you to start buying booze on Sunday I am sure they will let you know.

Senator Mitch Seabaugh

At one point he held office in Coweta county which, IIRC, was on the list of dry counties.

Am I correct in assuming if this becomes a State issue the chances are better that it will never happen?
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Old 02-16-2011, 12:20 PM
JPD
 
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Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
Am I correct in assuming if this becomes a State issue the chances are better that it will never happen?
Yes, but I don't think it's going to happen either way.
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Old 02-16-2011, 12:22 PM
JPD
 
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Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
From the link:

"Senator Seabaugh’s goal in office is to cultivate more involvement in the political process by citizens in his district."

If only we could think of a way in which to make this happen.


Oh wait...
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Old 02-16-2011, 12:27 PM
 
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Let me preface, I'm not a drinker so the sale of alcohol hasn't really gotten my attention (but one shouldn't have to be personally impacted by an issue to care about it) but I am concerned for the reasoning and real intent of such "moral laws" by the government.
Yes we know America is a predominantly christian country, but with that said the reasoning for these blue laws are unconstitutional. Yes I agree that the reasoning for the ban is stupid, but let me ask this question, would the non sale of alcohol in grocery stores be easier to accept if the religious aspect was not in play?

Yes I know it would be a hard sale b/c the question of "why this day?" would come up, but indulge me for a second. For instance, kids can see R-rated movies but only with their parent/guardian. The gov. could simply argue "you can buy alcohol except for Sunday...just b/c(and they could come up with any "somewhat rational" reason as to why) For the sake of argument lets say they convinced the voters. It would be like any other law i.e. last call, minimum drinking age etc." Would I like to see other people consume less alcohol? of course, but it's not my place to make rules about personal conduct nor would I if an elected official, propose such a law. I think the the point of sep. of church and state with has already been make in this thread is paramount. The origins of these blue laws and the Ten Commandments is something that shouldn't be brushed over. No Gov. should tell someone how to follow 1-4, but should respect 5-10. Point being, basing the current law on religion alone is a flawed argument that can never be won and another argument must be presented to justify such a ban. Personally I see no other such solid argument.

Last edited by ATLHRLGUY; 02-16-2011 at 12:50 PM..
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Old 02-16-2011, 12:49 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,838,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLHRLGUY View Post
Let me preface, I'm not a drinker so the sale of alcohol hasn't really gotten my attention (but one shouldn't have to be personally impacted by an issue to give a flip about it) but I am concerned for the reasoning and real intent of such "moral laws" by the government.
Yes we know America is a predominantly christian country, but with that said the reasoning for these blue laws are unconstitutional. Yes I agree that the reasoning for the ban is stupid, but let me ask this question, would the non sale of alcohol in grocery stores be easier to accept if the religious aspect was not in play?

Yes I know it would be a hard sale b/c the question of "why this day?" would come up, but indulge me for a second. For instance, kids can see R-rated movies but only with their parent/guardian. The gov. could simply argue "you can buy alcohol except for Sunday...just b/c(and they could come up with any "somewhat rational" reason as to why) For the sake of argument lets say they convinced the voters. It would be like any other law i.e. last call, minimum drinking age etc." Point being, basing the current law on religion alone is a flawed argument that can never be won and other argument must be presented to justify such a ban.
I think Sonny Perdue vetoed this bill several times on the basis that there would be an increase of underage drinking--if I understand you correctly?

From the bio it seems Senator Seabaugh would agree with former Gov. Perdue.

Majority Whip of the Senate, I believe.
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Old 02-16-2011, 12:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
I think Sonny Perdue vetoed this bill several times on the basis that there would be an increase of underage drinking--if I understand you correctly?

From the bio it seems Senator Seabaugh would agree with former Gov. Perdue.

Majority Whip of the Senate, I believe.
Yeah I hear ya, I just think Perdue's argument was weak, and we all know the real reason, my point is, give me a better argument, b/c anyone can easily bust up the underage drinking argument, if that was the case they should ban sales on Fridays and Saturdays when most underage kids are drinking. But anyways, it looks like the state may want to just push along this battle to the voters and not take a stance themselves, what else is new?
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Old 02-16-2011, 12:56 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,838,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLHRLGUY View Post
Yeah I hear ya, I just think Perdue's argument was weak, and we all know the real reason, my point is, give me a better argument, b/c anyone can easily bust up the underage drinking argument, if that was the case they should ban sales on Fridays and Saturdays when most underage kids are drinking.
A fresh argument against Sunday sales: ‘We don’t want to be like California’ | Political Insider

'Said state Sen. Mitch Seabaugh, R-Sharpsburg, who opposes the bill:

”Unfortunately, a lot of times we use allowing local control to punt a difficult issue down the road. ….When you read the [state] constitution, we are – at the state Legislature – supposed to have the task of regulating alcohol sales. We should make that decision, I believe, one way or the other, for the entire state.

“Using the cover of local control is taking a step toward being a referendum state. I don’t believe that that’s in the best interest of our state.”

Barry Loudermilk, R-Cassville, is a freshman Senator and former House member. He declared himself to be undecided, but appeared to be leaning toward Seabaugh’s argument.

“I do have an Anheuser-Busch plant in my district, so there is some interest there,” Loudermilk conceded.'
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Old 02-16-2011, 01:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
A fresh argument against Sunday sales: ‘We don’t want to be like California’ | Political Insider

'Said state Sen. Mitch Seabaugh, R-Sharpsburg, who opposes the bill:

”Unfortunately, a lot of times we use allowing local control to punt a difficult issue down the road. ….When you read the [state] constitution, we are – at the state Legislature – supposed to have the task of regulating alcohol sales. We should make that decision, I believe, one way or the other, for the entire state.

“Using the cover of local control is taking a step toward being a referendum state. I don’t believe that that’s in the best interest of our state.”

Barry Loudermilk, R-Cassville, is a freshman Senator and former House member. He declared himself to be undecided, but appeared to be leaning toward Seabaugh’s argument.

“I do have an Anheuser-Busch plant in my district, so there is some interest there,” Loudermilk conceded.'
Thanks for the link TAH. A little back-bone I see from the gold dome that's a good sign. I just want a solid argument for such justification. The legislators in favor of the continued ban need a legally solid reason, and like I said before I just don't see one.
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Old 02-16-2011, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLHRLGUY View Post
Thanks for the link TAH. A little back-bone I see from the gold dome that's a good sign. I just want a solid argument for such justification. The legislators in favor of the continued ban need a legally solid reason, and like I said before I just don't see one.
”Unfortunately, a lot of times we use allowing local control to punt a difficult issue down the road. ….When you read the [state] constitution, we are – at the state Legislature – supposed to have the task of regulating alcohol sales. We should make that decision, I believe, one way or the other, for the entire state.

“Using the cover of local control is taking a step toward being a referendum state. I don’t believe that that’s in the best interest of our state.”

The State Constitution provides the legal reason?

It seems to me that Sunday alcohol sales/by the drink were passed by local referendums. All I can get out of this is that GA must never become as Liberal as CA---or the other 46 states which allow Sunday sales, some of which are Red states. Fine, whatever.
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Old 02-16-2011, 01:23 PM
JPD
 
12,159 posts, read 15,066,795 times
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Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
”Unfortunately, a lot of times we use allowing [b]local control to punt a difficult issue down the road. ….
More BS.

In this case, holding local referendums would not "punt the issue down the road." On the contrary, it would settle the issue once and for all, never to waste the time of our elected officials ever again.
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