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Old 03-21-2011, 02:39 PM
 
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Most UGA grads go to Atlanta.

UGA's capus is very well-integrated with downtown Athens. Broad Street, the main drag in Athens, runs along the north side of the campus, and there is a ton of foot traffic between downtown and campus during the day. At night, downtown Athens is a major nightlife zone--it certainly is a more substantial concentration of bars than anything in Atlanta.

Some of the neighborhoods around UGA's campus, especially Five Points, are the best in Athens, and are reminiscent of Atlanta's intown neighborhoods. Athens is a great little city.

And my (biased) opinion is that Sanford Stadium enhances UGA's campus, rather than just being a freestanding monolith like a couple schools over in Alabama I won't name. You can get a view into the stadium from Sanford Drive, and the whole stadium is built into a natural valley.

From UGA's Athletic Department website:





Georgia Bulldogs - Facilities
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Old 03-21-2011, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, Georgia
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Wow.. those are some nic pics.

Athens is also rated the top 20 for 25 best places to retire.
25 Best Places to Retire - Athens, GA (20) - CNNMoney.com
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Old 03-21-2011, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrpanda View Post
What is UGA's campus like? I went to U of Michigan and wife went to U of Illinois. We were both business majors. I get the feeling that UGA's campus is similar to that of Ann Arbor or Urbana/Champaign. Am I correct? Even UCLA's campus is removed from the LA city itself.

Georgia Tech's campus reminds me of NYU. The campus seems to be integrated in to the city. I just drive by it everytime i drive up north on 85... but haven't been inside the campus itself.

Personally, I am not really a big fan of city campuses.
I was hestitant to enter this thread, however, being a fifth generation UGA graduate, I suppose I had to.

As far as the campus, there are very few rivalries, especially for a public school. It is has played the backdrop in countless films. It is also the first state chartered university in the country; chartered in 1785.

In all honesty, I think that UNC Chapel Hill is probably a better school in terms of academics. However, the BOR is usually quite generous to UGA, so I think the tides may be changing. In fact, my boss sits on the BOR, so I know a little of these things.... The rankings for many of the colleges continue to rise. I am personally a graduate of Terry College of Business. My father was a history and English major and continued on to get his JD from UGA. Let's also not forget that the the highest honor and achievement within the fields of broadcast journalism, documentary film making, educational and children's programming, and entertainment, the Peabody Awards, are awarded by the Grady College of Journalism at UGA.
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Old 03-21-2011, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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The founders of the University were graduates of Yale that wanted to start public higher education in the south, which didn't exist previously. The old campus has some similarities to the quadrangles of Yale. The old buildings are smaller though and the campus is more spread out and we have much prettier trees than New Haven has.

The only thing I will say is architecture of the 50s, 60s, and 70s were not kind to UGA.... or any other college campus for that matter.

The old town center of Athens immediately borders the old North Campus. In fact the college site was chosen first and the bought the land that is now Downtown Athens and sold it off to businesses and residences that wanted to be near the college for a profit to help build the college.

Athens is a college town in that the city literally grew up with the college, however it is a bit larger than typical college towns and there is more to it than just being a college town, but people don't see it or talk about it because it is not glamorous.

There are alot of industrial areas hidden away around the city. There is also a high concentration of the region's public housing. In the past much of the poor in rural areas got concentrated in some cites instead of others.

I like the stadium where it is. What you don't see in the photos too well is there is actually a steep valley that divides north and south campus. The stadium was built into that valley. A bridge goes over the valley to connect the campuses better. Early planners didn't know what to do with this, but bridge it over and make a football stadium.

The long-term campus plan will be to continue more buildings in the valley, but they are going to make a linked pedestrian bridge between the buildings and in many cases the main floors will be the second or third floor. Both the outside walkways ate Tate and the SLC conform to this long-range plan. This will eventually pull more day-to-day foot traffic away from the stadium.
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Old 03-21-2011, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Originally Posted by ericsonga View Post
Let's also not forget that the the highest honor and achievement within the fields of broadcast journalism, documentary film making, educational and children's programming, and entertainment, the Peabody Awards, are awarded by the Grady College of Journalism at UGA.
Just to add to this.... these fields are not usually ranked very often.

UGA is a go-to place for communication fields, especially for advertising, public relations, and broadcast news. They are very well respected in their academic research realm and one of the most published cited programs in those fields.
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Old 03-21-2011, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Well it might not be fair for me to answer that question as I only got my graduate degree a couple of years ago (the worse possible timing too ).

but, I do have an interesting tidbit from a conversation I had at UGA. As an undergrad I was very active in the programs I was in.... more so than most. In the geography department I was an undergraduate TA. One of my jobs was to help with all of the grade bookkeeping and grading, etc.. so the professors could spend more time on research, while still teaching. At the end of the semester we sat together to go through all of the grades, do a self-audit, and to choose grade curve or changes in grade cut-offs that would be made (we didn't end up making much of a change at all).

This led to a long conversation about grade inflation. It just happens to be the Geography Dept. within the sciences at UGA has been more resistant to grade inflation. However, one of the big issues the professor discussed is how much better the students are now, than they were 10, 20, and 30 years ago. He made a key point of this in discussing grade inflation......the two trade-offs being: 1) allow grades and GPA to rise to reflect better students 2) Maintain the same given grade distributions and trust the value of the degree is worth more.

He told me though it was night and day the students were better. They understood the material better and quicker, he was able to cover more ground within the course itself, the quality of questions in class got much better, and fewer things slowed the classes down. In less detail his general sentiment was shared with me in the three different academic departments I took advanced classes in.

A large part of this is due to the Hope scholarship and Atlanta growing up as a big city.

I also want to spot out one field... Ecology... the department at UGA was upgraded to become its own school. The guy who established the school was considered a pioneer of modern day ecology. In many ways this field of student is heavily integrated and a small piece of many of the other older earth science fields (biology, geography, geology, etc..). It also mixes public policy and economics into the discussion alot more.

UGA also has a really good loosely related program... landscape architecture. It is fairly new and again is a mix of many other different fields for specific advanced understanding or niche use.

Both of these programs are heavily integrated with earth sciences and both are considerably newer and show how some of the coursework in universities are evolving and growing more specific/niche-oriented.

Now moving forward.... In the future one thing I will examine about UGA specifically that I saw as a major problem and pitfall when I was there as both an undergraduate and graduate student was the general statistics classes.

At least in terms of class quality it wasn't very good at all. Many of the better research programs at UGA have strengthened forms of self-teaching quantitative research methods -and- basic statistics mixed together to make up for this short fall. (one of the fixes to this needs to separate or remove statistics requirements from students who aren't going to use statistics in advanced courses. UGA attracts alot of people that are more liberal arts, fine arts, and agriculture that don't have a good quantitative focus and it holds down the many students that needs this to get ahead.)

Just to show one example of how this indirectly affects other departments... I would look at the Terry College of business. It really is a very good school and has good teachers and attracts very bright students, but a few of the smaller mostly unnoticed things by public and students who are there are the subtle difference in coursework requirements. A key program for any top business school is a strong economics department. It is probably the single best quantitative research program within the social sciences in general through the field of econometrics. Yet for undergraduates in economics introductory econometrics is not a required course. Only a few of students wanting to get ahead or get into a more demanding graduate school take that course. (Just an FYI for anyone interviewing a Terry College economics graduate... ask them if they took this course... It is an excellent way to see if the student was the type of person to want to take a more demanding course to get ahead and genuinely interested in learning more).

Even in that course with a handful of harder working students, the teacher had to do a statistics review for a few weeks in the beginning. Statistics was a prerequisite, but the classes were so poorly taught the teacher had to make sure everyone was on the same page to some extent before moving on with the actual class. Ironically, I think this also plays a part in scaring some students away from the course. You need a firm grasp of statistics to truly get a firm grasp of econometrics. This is/should be an essential class for someone wanting to go into finance, economics, or other related social science research fields.

That aside many universities have programs or colleges students have to apply to get into beyond getting in the university. UGA calls some a high-demand college or major. These are majors where students are turned away and the internal selectivity is much higher.

At UGA these programs/college are going to the journalism College, the business college, some of the education majors (UGA is typically a top program for primary and secondary teaching programs), some of the art and music programs, genetics, international affairs, and landscape architecture.

You will see alot of outside programs that take students who don't get into these programs, like consumer journalism, consumer economics, people who stay in biology when they wanted to get into genetics, etc..
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Old 03-21-2011, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
No, Tech is more of an island. Only the recent expansion into Midtown do we see a campus somewhat integrated into the city and even that part is not very urbanized. If you are talking NYU city campus, the closest thing to that is Georgia State University which is literally downtown Atlanta.
I agree.

Tech has a much more cohesive campus within itself. It is built to encourage traffic to go around it rather than through it, which allows the campus to be used mostly by students, professors, and people working at the campus.

In contrast GSU is built into the downtown grid. They even have some buildings that aren't surrounded by GSU's main campus like the Rialto and Aderhold learning center in the Fairlie-Poplar district
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Old 03-21-2011, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, Georgia
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The flagship state school where i live is University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. The school is known for its strong engineering (both grad & undergrad) and business (undergrad) programs. U of I is currenlty ranked #47 where UGA is behind it at #56.

If UGA takes out U of I, I will be 100% convinced that UGA is on its way to the UNC Ivy status of the south. Any chance the Hope Scholarship will be still available when my two boys apply for college 16 years from now? because Mr and Mrs Panda would like to retire in our early 50s.
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Old 03-21-2011, 06:42 PM
 
357 posts, read 651,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrpanda View Post
The flagship state school where i live is University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. The school is known for its strong engineering (both grad & undergrad) and business (undergrad) programs. U of I is currenlty ranked #47 where UGA is behind it at #56.

If UGA takes out U of I, I will be 100% convinced that UGA is on its way to the UNC Ivy status of the south. Any chance the Hope Scholarship will be still available when my two boys apply for college 16 years from now?
I doubt it. start saving
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Old 03-21-2011, 07:17 PM
 
357 posts, read 651,963 times
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^
I was referring to the Hope scholarship being around in 16 years. A combination of dumb politicians and increased population growth have caused Hope to raise it's eligibility requirements. I cant imagine what will become of it in 16 years.

And I would hope by that time that my alma mata would be considered a public ivy
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