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Old 05-25-2011, 02:57 PM
 
1 posts, read 906 times
Reputation: 13

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Here is the AJC article comparing our TOD in Atlanta to Washington DC's since our system's were built around the same time. With this transportation tax about to be voted on, what chance do we have that our system will be built out and we get TOD development around our Marta station's?


http://www.ajc.com/opinion/mass-tran...le-956519.html

Last edited by atlantagreg30127; 05-25-2011 at 08:40 PM..
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Old 05-25-2011, 03:02 PM
 
13,581 posts, read 22,036,711 times
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You should have posted things this way:

The evolution of Metrorail, 1976-2010 - Greater Greater Washington


Mass transit: A tale of two cities *| ajc.com
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Old 05-25-2011, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,521 posts, read 4,260,502 times
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Each one teach one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
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Old 05-25-2011, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta & Savannah, GA - Corpus Christi, TX
4,474 posts, read 7,292,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlkingofthesouth View Post
copyrighted article removed - link remains

Mass transit: A tale of two cities *| ajc.com
Such an awesome first post! Love it, love it, love it!

Last edited by atlantagreg30127; 05-25-2011 at 08:40 PM..
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Old 05-25-2011, 08:33 PM
 
Location: 30080
2,218 posts, read 3,532,135 times
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The most important quote of the whole article.

Quote:
Plus, more than 70 percent of the walkable, rail-served development is taking place in the suburbs. It is more about the transformation of the suburbs than redevelopment of the city.
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Old 05-25-2011, 08:47 PM
 
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Lookie here...


"Why Washington is better than Atlanta: Atlanta and Washington both had few walkable places in 1976; today, our area has many while Atlanta still has few. A big difference: we invested in Metro while Atlanta let MARTA stagnate. (AJC)"


Lunch links: How we compare - Greater Greater Washington
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Old 05-25-2011, 08:48 PM
 
13,581 posts, read 22,036,711 times
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Sigh.

What could have been.


But hey, y'all...we still can. Let's hope and dream...and get to it!
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Old 05-25-2011, 09:30 PM
 
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Both great reads. However how is their rail doing financially? Is it also bleeding money?

Developing Densely: Estimating the Effect of Subway Growth on New York City Land Uses - Transport Research International Documentation - TRID
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Old 05-25-2011, 11:58 PM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
7,909 posts, read 12,170,743 times
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Meh, I find both articles lacking.

In regard to the part about WMATA and DC, they bandied about the term "Washington DC had few walkable areas in 1976". Excuse me while I give the gas face....

Seriously, DC had few walkable areas? DC by design is one of Americas most walkable cities so I am not sure what they are talking about there. Perhaps they left off the rest of that statement which probably goes "DC had few walkable areas that I would feel safe walking in and/or appeal to my yuppie ideal of walkable".

Secondly, if you just look at the area in which MARTA serves it has been a smashing success despite all the FUD and unfounded fears about it's safety. It's presence revitalized many areas of the city that were downtrodden at the time such as Midtown, Decatur proper, and pretty much all the hip east side neighborhoods (my how short memories are that forget that those places once were on hard times). There also have been tangible large scale TOD around certain MARTA stations like Lindbergh and the area around Sandy Springs station. And lets not forget that MARTA connected dozens of neighborhoods and districts together all over this city.

Are there opportunities to improve? To say yes is an understatement. Is it perfect? No. But act as if MARTA is some how deficient or a failure because counties that neither paid for it or wanted didn't benefit from it's construction is extremely short sighted. I'm tired of the City of Atlanta having to take all the criticism for the failings of municipalities that purposefully did not take part in our progress.
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Old 05-26-2011, 03:54 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,521 posts, read 4,260,502 times
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I myself would also lay a lot of blame for MARTA & Georgia transit in general's lack of progress at the state legislature level as well.

Far too often these state representatives & state senators try to milk those unfounded surburban/exurban fears of transit for short-term political gain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
Meh, I find both articles lacking.

In regard to the part about WMATA and DC, they bandied about the term "Washington DC had few walkable areas in 1976". Excuse me while I give the gas face....

Seriously, DC had few walkable areas? DC by design is one of Americas most walkable cities so I am not sure what they are talking about there. Perhaps they left off the rest of that statement which probably goes "DC had few walkable areas that I would feel safe walking in and/or appeal to my yuppie ideal of walkable".

Secondly, if you just look at the area in which MARTA serves it has been a smashing success despite all the FUD and unfounded fears about it's safety. It's presence revitalized many areas of the city that were downtrodden at the time such as Midtown, Decatur proper, and pretty much all the hip east side neighborhoods (my how short memories are that forget that those places once were on hard times). There also have been tangible large scale TOD around certain MARTA stations like Lindbergh and the area around Sandy Springs station. And lets not forget that MARTA connected dozens of neighborhoods and districts together all over this city.

Are there opportunities to improve? To say yes is an understatement. Is it perfect? No. But act as if MARTA is some how deficient or a failure because counties that neither paid for it or wanted didn't benefit from it's construction is extremely short sighted. I'm tired of the City of Atlanta having to take all the criticism for the failings of municipalities that purposefully did not take part in our progress.
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