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Old 07-04-2011, 12:43 PM
 
49 posts, read 103,001 times
Reputation: 24

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Box View Post
They weren't viewed as Americans or given the same rights as others.
True, but one argument that could not be brought against african americans during that period age was that they came here illegally on their "Own" accord.
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Old 07-05-2011, 11:33 AM
 
Location: ATLANTA
200 posts, read 379,527 times
Reputation: 105
I don't have ANY problem with an immigrant who enters this country and becomes naturalized the right way. However, I do take an issue with illegal immigrants who basically "cut the line" disregarding others who want to enter this country the right way.

This will continue to be an issue dealt within each individual state because corporate big business america (who profits from cheap illegal labor) chooses to do nothing.
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Old 07-05-2011, 01:58 PM
 
1,301 posts, read 1,853,450 times
Reputation: 531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dytdude View Post
I don't have ANY problem with an immigrant who enters this country and becomes naturalized the right way. However, I do take an issue with illegal immigrants who basically "cut the line" disregarding others who want to enter this country the right way.

This will continue to be an issue dealt within each individual state because corporate big business america (who profits from cheap illegal labor) chooses to do nothing.
Do you think Politicans MIGHT have something to do with this flood of illegals or is it just the Corporations looking for cheap labor?
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Old 07-06-2011, 07:16 AM
 
28,146 posts, read 24,679,387 times
Reputation: 9534
Quote:
Originally Posted by suprascooby22 View Post
Do you think Politicans MIGHT have something to do with this flood of illegals or is it just the Corporations looking for cheap labor?
Politicians are simply representatives of the people. We elect them and we can unelect them. So what they do really comes back on each of us individually.
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Old 07-06-2011, 08:46 AM
 
44,623 posts, read 43,162,678 times
Reputation: 14411
I don't think it will matter in the end. Sure, the persons who are here illegally will leave. However, I haven't heard many locals express any interest interest in going into the fields and doing that work. From what I heard, some politician was in favor of using prisoners to fill in the labor gap. Either way, it won't matter much.
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Old 07-06-2011, 03:36 PM
 
Location: ATLANTA
200 posts, read 379,527 times
Reputation: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by suprascooby22 View Post
Do you think Politicans MIGHT have something to do with this flood of illegals or is it just the Corporations looking for cheap labor?
Of course they are deeply involved in the flood of illegals. Corporations pay to have lobbyists in Congress so that their interests are represnted. Who do you think funds their campaigns? The biggest donors come from the corporations. Unfortunately they are all in cahoots.
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Old 07-07-2011, 04:09 PM
 
Location: 30080
2,124 posts, read 3,394,976 times
Reputation: 1461
Looks like its working pretty well

Quote:
So far, the experiment at Minor's farm is yielding mixed results. On the first two days, all the probationers quit by mid-afternoon, said Mendez, one of two crew leaders at Minor's farm.

"Those guys out here weren't out there 30 minutes and they got the bucket and just threw them in the air and say, `Bonk this, I ain't with this, I can't do this,'" said Jermond Powell, a 33-year-old probationer. "They just left, took off across the field walking."

Mendez put the probationers to the test last Wednesday, assigning them to fill one truck and a Latino crew to a second truck. The Latinos picked six truckloads of cucumbers compared to one truckload and four bins for the probationers.

"It's not going to work," Mendez said. "No way. If I'm going to depend on the probation people, I'm never going to get the crops up."

Conditions in the field are bruising, and the probationers didn't seem to know what to expect. Cucumber plants hug the ground, forcing the workers to bend over, push aside the large leaves and pull them from the vine. Unlike the Mexican and Guatemalan workers, the probationers didn't wear gloves to protect their hands from the small but prickly thorns on the vines and sandpaper-rough leaves.

The harvesters carried filled buckets on their shoulders to a nearby flatbed truck and hoisted them up to a dumper, who tossed the vegetables into a bin.

Temperatures hovered in the low 90s with heavy humidity Thursday, but taking off a shirt to relieve the heat invited a blistering sunburn. Tiny gnats flew into workers' eyes and ears. One experienced Latino worker carried a machete that he used to dispatch a rattlesnake found in the fields.

By law, each worker must earn minimum wage, or $7.25 an hour. But there's an incentive system. Harvesters get a green ticket worth 50 cents every time they dump a bucket of cucumbers. If they collect more than 15 tickets an hour, they can beat minimum wage.
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Old 07-08-2011, 10:46 AM
 
16,724 posts, read 13,699,473 times
Reputation: 40996
I knew this would happen, especially with softy probationers. What probationer is going to do this? They aren't getting paid, are they? This is more like punishment, and it sounds like they weren't supplied with the tools they needed for the job to begin with.
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Old 07-08-2011, 02:48 PM
 
Location: 30080
2,124 posts, read 3,394,976 times
Reputation: 1461
Quote:
Originally Posted by convextech View Post
I knew this would happen, especially with softy probationers. What probationer is going to do this? They aren't getting paid, are they? This is more like punishment, and it sounds like they weren't supplied with the tools they needed for the job to begin with.
Uh theyre on probation not inmates. They do get paid. And it only resorted to them having to use probationers because no one else is trying to do that type of work aside from the folks that the immigration law ran off.
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Old 07-15-2011, 07:33 PM
 
28,146 posts, read 24,679,387 times
Reputation: 9534
Apparently these jobs are not proving too popular with probationers.

Quote:
Hogan gave few specifics on worker turnover, saying the numbers are still being collected and reviewed. But she says that when the program began June 13, the number of participants each day was in the single digits. As of June 20, "10, 11 or 12" were showing up for work.

During the first week, an average of seven probationers worked each day in Sumter County, Hogan said. An average of five or so were repeat workers.

We contacted the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association for more information. Both farms participating in the pilot project are part of the group, which opposed the immigration crackdown.

Executive Director Charles Hall stressed that itís too early to pass judgment on the pilot program. Growers may be unable to tell how well it works until after the fall harvest.

"This may be a good alternative. It may be a partial solution," Hall said. "It will take us some time to work through."

In Sumter County, the program began Monday June 13, when three probationers showed up for work, Hall said. None of them returned the next day.

On Tuesday, two arrived and worked all day.

One of them returned Wednesday, and nine new recruits joined him. Six of the 10 probationers who showed up worked most of the day.

In Colquitt County, the program started June 18, Nine of 11 probationers made it through the work day, Hall said. Five returned the next day.

PolitiFact Georgia | Deal says "substantial" number of probationers hired for shortage able to handle farm work
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